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offshorebirder

Here are a few more insect pics from coastal South Carolina:

 

 

This is an annual Cicada of some kind (Tibicen spp.)

 

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This is a female Eastern Pondhawk dragonfly. E. Pondhawks are among the most aggressive and voracious of all dragonflies - they often capture and consume other dragonflies larger than they are.

 

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This is a female Great Blue Skimmer.

 

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offshorebirder

Velvet Ant - a wingless wasp that is a formidable hunter. It paralyzes prey for its larvae to feed upon underground.

 

 

 

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offshorebirder

Here is a short video clip of the Velvet Ant (females are wingless, males have wings). The one in the photo above + video is Dasymutilla occidentalis. Their local name is "Cow Killers" - but although their sting is strong, it is not really that strong.

 

Also present was a smaller species - Dasymutilla quadriguttata. Day before yesterday I had two members of both species (4 Velvet Ants total) in a 40-meter stretch of dike at Bear Island Wildlife Management Area in coastal South Carolina.

 

I did not get any photos of Dasymutilla quadriguttata but you can see them at Bugguide: http://bugguide.net/node/view/874302

 

 

* Be sure to increase the video quality to 1080p HD

Edited by offshorebirder

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offshorebirder

A few more photos for this topic:

 

Here is another kind of hummingbird moth (Sphinx Moth). It is a Tersa Sphinx (Xylophanes tersa) nectaring at Turk's Cap Hibiscus just after sundown.

 

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Here is a mating pair of Regal Moths (Citheronia regalis) photographed beneath a Black Walnut tree - their host plant. Saluda, North Carolina, in the Appalachian mountains.

 

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Here is a Common Checkered-Skipper butterfly drinking from damp mud:

 

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A previous post of mine included a Cow Fly (tabanus spp), a huge relative of Horse Flies. This photo gives an idea of their size - note the much smaller Horse Fly at the bottom of the photo.

 

I imagine the poor Cow Flies thought they had found a Bison or something, but it was just a large, dark, hot, Co2-emitting van. They seem to be aggregating around the rubber window gasket - looking for the soft parts on the "Bison" perhaps. Some of the flies appear to have landed on top of each other - I am not sure if it was an impromptu mating aggregation or what...

 

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Edited by offshorebirder

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offshorebirder

Here is a photo of a roosting Tersa Sphinx (a type of Hummingbird Moth) - left and right views.

 

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Tom Kellie

~ @@offshorebirder

 

The most recently posted image is TERRIFIC!

I've never seen a Sphinx Moth at such resolution.

Great color and luminosity, too!

Thank you!

Tom K.

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offshorebirder

Thanks @@Tom Kellie.

 

I was fortunate; I unintentionally disturbed the Sphinx Moth (AKA Hummingbird Moth) while pulling up some invasive weeds and it flushed out of hiding. I watched it during its 20-meter flight to another hiding place low to the ground, memorizing its location. Then I went and got my camera, and was rewarded with daytime photo opportunities of a roosting Sphingidae.

 

Equipment was a Canon 7D mk I and a 300mm f/4 IS lens.

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Tom Kellie

~ @@offshorebirder

 

That's a GREAT background story!

I especially like knowing such details, as they provide a sense of ‘how to do it’ were I ever to find myself in a comparable situation.

Your nimble response I admire!

Many thanks for the thorough explanation!

Tom K.

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Atdahl

Great shots everyone. LOVE the macro shots @@offshorebirder.

 

Here are a few from around our place in Arizona:

 

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offshorebirder

Nice shots @@Atdahl - love the Phasmid!

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Antee

Giraffe weevil from Mantadia NP , Madagascar.

 

Endemic to this fantastic island.

The male has three times longer neck than the female. This is a male.

 

Strange insect!

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Edited by Antee

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Tom Kellie

Giraffe weevil from Mantadia NP , Madagascar.

 

Endemic to this fantastic island.

The male has three times longer neck than the female. This is a male.

 

Strange insect!

 

~ @@Antee

 

These are shown in entomology textbooks, but I've never seen one.

I'm glad that you did, and shared it here on Safaritalk.

What a body shape!

Thank you.

Tom K.

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CaroleE

Amsterdam. My balcony. This summer.

 

post-49465-0-70698500-1444759275_thumb.jpg

 

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Tom Kellie

Amsterdam. My balcony. This summer.

 

~ @@CaroleE

 

That lovely image demonstrates that one needn't trek to remote lands to make stunningly lovely wildlife images.

The color...the composition...the focus...all TERRIFIC!

Truly a marvelous image, with splendid luminosity.

That you saw it, photographed it and shared it with us on Safaritalk is a blessing.

Many Thanks!

Tom K.

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CaroleE

@@Tom Kellie

 

Thanks Tom.

 

I sent this photo to my Mum and said exactly that...you do not have to travel far to see wildlife.

 

The making of this photo was anything but relaxed. I had just come home from work, watering the plants and spotted the dragonfly. I went to grab my camera only to find the wrong lens on it. Mad scramble to find and wrench open camera bag, change lenses and then take a half decent photo before it flew away!

 

Therefore I really appreciate your very kind comments.

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Tom Kellie

@@Tom Kellie

 

Thanks Tom.

 

I sent this photo to my Mum and said exactly that...you do not have to travel far to see wildlife.

 

The making of this photo was anything but relaxed. I had just come home from work, watering the plants and spotted the dragonfly. I went to grab my camera only to find the wrong lens on it. Mad scramble to find and wrench open camera bag, change lenses and then take a half decent photo before it flew away!

 

Therefore I really appreciate your very kind comments.

 

~ @@CaroleE

 

Ha! Your description caused me to laugh out loud, as I've done exactly like you!

I'll spot something — a wildly beautiful red sunrise, for example — and pull out the camera only to discover everything's wrong!

A frantic scramble which only the angels see — I hope they aren't able to hear the oaths I mutter — in search of the right components.

In nearly every case, the sight remains as before, nothing lost.

Your mom is right. Nature is at our windowsill.

Tom K.

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CaroleE

@@Tom Kellie

 

I forgot about the oaths :)

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Tom Kellie

@@Tom Kellie

 

I forgot about the oaths :)

 

~ @@CaroleE

 

What can we say?

Mad scrambles for camera gear occasionally include the odd phrase seldom heard during vespers in a convent.

Tom K.

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Lyss

Spent a Sunday morning on a hike, unfortunately in Florida by 8 am the humidity and heat becomes such that very little is out and about in the open areas. I was rewarded with this lovely Dragonfly though who decided to sit patiently while I photographed him, and the beautiful work only an 8 legged seamstress could create. I didn't know where the owner was and I didn't feel brave enough to go walking through the bush to get closer.

Smiling Dragonfly.jpg

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pomkiwi

Spot-winged threadtail, a species of damselfly found only in the Kimberley region of Australia.

 

DSC_8500.jpg.b02854be4372b2439a118c81f39e8abd.jpg

 

Nikon D7200, 18-300mm lens @ 300mm. f/6.3, ISO200, 1/15sec.

Hand-held whilst reclining in the same pool!

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