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Show us your zebras...

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Game Warden

Please include where and when taken, tech specs and any other pertinent details about the sighting. Thanks, Matt.

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Sverker

Two zebras in South Luangwa NP.



To watch it in fullscreen, click "YouTube". Right now, I cannot see fullscreen in Safari on Mac, but at least it works in Firefox. Strange. Edited by Sverker

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CapitanBurton
Selous Game Reserve (Tanzania) Sep 2013


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CapitanBurton
This group in Mgadigadi pan (Sep 2009), part of the thousands we saw as part of the migration from Boteti River
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(Edited, Matt, to include the larger format image.)

 

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Kingfisher Safaris

This unfortunate Zebra I came across in the Makgadikgadi Pans NP not too far from the Khumaga campsite.

 

 

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And this one is crossing the Boteti River nearby

 

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And this one in Etosha, Namibia

 

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Edited by Kingfisher Safaris

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JD5000

don't you just feel for this zebra .his tattoo artist got fed up of colouring in the lines.

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Game Warden

That was done by an apprentice whilst the main artist was on tea break :)

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africapurohit

A pregnant mare who had a lucky escape from lions, with oxpeckers flocking to the wounds - Ruaha National Park, 2008.

 

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Game Warden

That first pic has a dreamy quality to it, almost like using a soft focus filter back in the day...

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Game Warden

I think you need to write a tutorial working through the technique with before during and after images :)

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madaboutcheetah

Mara Plains, Feb 2012

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africapurohit

@@madaboutcheetah brilliant shot and not a wildebeest in sight!

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Treepol

During June 2008 in the Serengeti we watched waves of zebra milling about before stopping to nervously drink at a small river crossing. We had seen a large crocodile about 20m up the river from the drinking hole and stopped to watch the action. This time, all the zebra managed a drink for the muddy-looking water hole and wandered off to graze, safe for another day.

 

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madaboutcheetah

@@madaboutcheetah brilliant shot and not a wildebeest in sight!

 

Off-season Mara. haha

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Safaridude

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Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania - September '95

 

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Ngorongoro Crater, Tanzania - September '06

 

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Mbirikani Group Ranch, Kenya - August '07

 

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Lewa Wildlife Conservancy, Kenya - August '07

 

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Etosha National Park, Namibia - August '08

 

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Lewa Wildlife Conservancy, Kenya - March '09

 

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Busanga Plains, Kafue National Park, Zambia - September '09

 

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Ruaha National Park, Tanzania - September '10

 

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Vumbura, Okavango Delta, Botswana - March '11

 

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Amboseli National Park, Kenya - February '12

 

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Nairobi National Park, Kenya - February '12

Edited by Safaridude

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Safaridude

Testing.

Edited by Safaridude

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madaboutcheetah

Safaridude,

It worked! You not seeing your uploads? Lovely images.....

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Game Warden

Wow, that lion (?) attack survivor was lucky: nasty looking wound. I wonder if it was later predated with such a visible injury.

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Safaridude

Safaridude,

It worked! You not seeing your uploads? Lovely images.....

 

Thanks. A minor glitch fixed.

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Safaridude

Wow, that lion (?) attack survivor was lucky: nasty looking wound. I wonder if it was later predated with such a visible injury.

 

I would agree that it was a lion attack. It was moving very gingerly. Probably had hours, not days, left. It's rough out there.

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Panthera Pardus

The Cape Mountain Zebra (CMZ) – Equus zebra zebra.

 

The CMZ is a sub species of the Mountain Zebra. The other sub species is the Haartman’s Zebra (Equus zebra haartmanae). Haartmans’s Zebra is found in Angola and Namibia. The CMZ was near extinct with only about 80 animals left when the Mountain Zebra National Park (MZNP) in South Africa was proclaimed in 1937 to protect this animal. Toady there are about 3000 CMZ, some of them relocated to other Parks where they occurred historically.

 

The stripes can be either black or dark brown and white. Their stripes cover their whole bodies except for their bellies. The mountain zebra also has a dewlap.

 

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The Plains Zebra or Burchells Zebra - Equus burchelli.

 

This species has a large range from Northern Kenya right down to the Southern Cape in South Africa. There are colour variations with location. The Plains Zebra in Northern Kenya are distinctly black and white and striped to the hooves. As one moves further south there is a tendency for the black and white coloration to become less distinct with a brownish background and the striping itself is reduced towards the hind quarters and on the legs.

 

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Today it is known that the extinct Quagga (Equus quagga) and the plains zebra are identical genetically and there is a project in the Mokala National Park in South Africa to see if specially selected Plains Zebras known as Witgat Zebras (White Rumped) will eventually result in a Quagga.

 

 

White Rumped Zebras

 

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The project concentrates the still present, but diluted and dispersed Quagga characteristics from Plains Zebra.

 

The quagga had stripes only till the forelegs, plain white legs and a brownish back.

 

There is a third species of Zebra known as the Imperial Zebra or Grevy’s Zebra (Equus grevyi) which is found in Northern Kenya and Ethiopia. This is the largest of the zebra, has narrow stripes and rounded ears and is the most endangered one.

 

 

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inyathi

 

 

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Boehm's zebras (Equus quagga boehmi) in Nechsiar NP Ethiopia

 

I would think that these Nechisar zebras are the most northerly left in Africa but I guess their range in Ethiopia may have extended slightly further north in the past.

 

 

The race of zebras in South Sudan is Equus quagga borensis curiously these animals are generally maneless.

 

Very interesting to see your photos of the 'witgat zebras' in Mokala NP @@Panthera Pardus it looks like they're still a bit too stripey for typical quaggas but the brown colouration on their rumps is definitely promising, I think the birth of a zebra with a coat pattern typical of a quagga is probably not too far away.

 

Here's a link to the Quagga Project for more info

 

The Hartmann's mountain zebra does just extend south of Namibia into the Northern Cape and are found in three protected areas, though I imagine all of the animals in Augrabies, Richtersveld and Goegap have been reintroduced from Namibia. I would be interested to know if there really are any of these zebras left in Iona NP in Angola as I can't find any up to date info on the web, since Iona is part of a Transfrontier park with Skeleton Coast I hope perhaps it will be restocked with animals from Namibia before too long to either replace missing species or just to inject new blood. In the current climate I can't see desert elephants or rhinos returning to Iona anytime soon but Hartmann's mountain zebras and some other species could certainly be moved to the park.

 

For more info on the endangered Grevy's Zebra

 

Grevy's Zebra Trust

 

 

 

Edited by inyathi

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Panthera Pardus

Thanks @@inyathi for the additional information and photos.

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AKR1

Masai Mara, Motorogi Conservancy, 2013

 

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Naboisho

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OOC:

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Mara North Conservancy

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AKR1

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