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Show us your small antelope species.

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Antee

Springbok in Namib-Naukluft NP.
Straight out in the desert south of Walvis Bay. Towards Sandwich harbour.

 

Fantastic barren area of our planet!

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Anomalure

@@Safaridude

 

Interesting that you mention Haggard's Oribi... Have you seen it in Boni or Ishaqbini on one of your trips there?

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Safaridude

@@Anomalure

 

I have not!

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samapi

I have a few of these small antelope species :) Enjoy!

 

Kirk's Dik-dik (Ndutu, Tanzania)

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Salt's Dik-dik (Awash NP, Ethiopia)

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Oribi (South Africa)

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Steenbok (Ndutu, Tanzania)

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Grysbok (south Africa)

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Grey Rhebok (Bontebok NP, South Africa)

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Tom Kellie

~ @@samapi

 

The collection you've added is very nice.

Merci beaucoup!

I'd recently read a mention of Grey Rhebok but had never seen one.

Your image above shows its colors and distinctive form so well.

Tom K.

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wenchy

2vwzofa.jpg

 

Saharan dorca - Arlit, Niger 2015

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samapi

Very nice @@wenchy ! Not usual at all to see photos of such dorca antelope

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Ben mosquito

I've not seen this topic yet, small is beautiful.

 

Oreotragus oreotragus- Klipspringer.

 

Shanti lava flow in Tsavo East National Park, July 2015.

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Edited by Ben mosquito

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Tom Kellie

~ @@Ben mosquito

 

Thank you for posting the klipspringer photos.

When you first encountered them, were they difficult to spot, or did they sufficiently stand out such that they were readily visible?

I've never seen klipspringer, although I visited areas where they're seen.

Somehow I've developed the impression that klipspringer are challenging to spot. Yet that may well be a mistaken notion.

Tom K.

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Ben mosquito

thanks @@Tom Kellie

We found this family by chance, they were hidden behind branches, but one was more fearless.

It was a small light spot on the dark lava flow on the side of the road, our eagle-eye guide saw it.

Ben.

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Tom Kellie

thanks @@Tom Kellie

We found this family by chance, they were hidden behind branches, but one was more fearless.

It was a small light spot on the dark lava flow on the side of the road, our eagle-eye guide saw it.

Ben.

 

~ @@Ben mosquito

 

Wonderful!

I'd never have been able to spot it.

I've hoped to see more klipspringer images posted in Safaritalk, as it's a species about which I'm curious.

Very good that you were able to enjoy seeing and photographing it!

Tom K.

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wenchy

buffons kob - W national Park, Niger Dec '15

 

jv1aap.jpg

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Tom Kellie

~ @@wenchy

 

What? Another W National Park image?

This is GREAT! Seeing any images at all from Niger is a rare treat.

Having never seen any sort of kob, it's an eye-opener to enjoy your fine Buffon's kob image.

Thank you!

Tom K.

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PT123

Lovely photo of the kob @@wenchy. Any chance of a trip report or additional pictures from Niger?

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wenchy

@@Tom Kellie

 

Gracias senor. Very kind of you. Hope you consider venturing west/central. W was surprisingly good viewing given usual chaotic biome of the region.

 

@@PT123 - will try. Will post up logistics at very least. Please consider going. The only way to encourage conservation is to go.

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Tom Kellie

@@Tom Kellie

 

Gracias senor. Very kind of you. Hope you consider venturing west/central. W was surprisingly good viewing given usual chaotic biome of the region.

 

@@PT123 - will try. Will post up logistics at very least. Please consider going. The only way to encourage conservation is to go.

 

~ @@wenchy

 

The two locations which keep tugging at my thoughts are Kidepo in northeastern Uganda and W du Niger.

Were I ever to identify a moderately reliable — I recognize that extreme ups and downs are a given — guide or tour operator, I'm willing to go.

I strongly like what you've written "the only way to encourage conservation is to go".

Tom K.

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Antee

It may not fit properly here ... but this was the best place.

The endangered Tibetan Antelope or Chiru.

From around 1 million animals in the mid ´50´s to about 75 000 today, it´s not easy to find them.
They live in inaccessible areas in between 3700m - 5000m above sea level. Very most of them on the Tibetan plateau.

Photo from no mans land on the high plateu not very far from the Qinghai Chinaborder.
Big distance, bad camera at the moment but at least there is finally some Tibetan Antelopes in here :)

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Tom Kellie

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Common Duiker Looking Over Its Back



Photographed at 4:21 pm on 24 January, 2016 at Leopard Hills Private Game Reserve, Sabi Sands, South Africa, using an EOS 1D X camera and an EF 400mm f/2.8L IS II super-telephoto lens.


ISO 250, 1/1600 sec., f/2.8, 400mm focal length, handheld Manual exposure.


*****************************************************************************************************


I'd confided to the ranger and tracker at Leopard Hills that I had a special affection for Steenbok, Bushbuck and Common Duiker. Accordingly, they patiently paused for me to photograph those species whenever they appeared.


This Common Duiker was half-hidden at the edge of a forest clearing. Before it disappeared, it looked over its back at us, which was sufficiently long for this portrait.

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Tom Kellie

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Male Steenbok in Leopard Hills



Taken on 4 October, 2015 at 5:26 pm in Sabi Sands, South Africa, using an EOS 1D X camera with an EF 200mm f/2.8L II telephoto lens

ISO 125, f/2.8, 1/200 sec., 200mm handheld Manual exposure while on a game drive from Leopard Hills


**********************************************************************************************************************************************************


~ Ever since first visiting Africa I've had a special affinity for the smaller antelope species. When this male steenbok was spotted during an evening game drive I almost jumped up from my seat.


Their nervous fragility, constant vigilance and delicate features reflect natural selection's niche-specific results. Although not the first steenbok I'd seen, it was one of the finest sightings.

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michael-ibk

Beautiful picture. I am very fond of Steenboks, endearing animals. Love their huge eyes.

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johnweir

CAVENDISH'S DIK-DIK. Madoqua cavendishi

(previously considered a subspecies of M. kirkii, see: Ungulate Taxonomy. Groves C & Grubb P. The John Hopkins University Press. 2011, Bovids of the World. Jose R. Castello. Princeton Field Guides. 2016.

 

The attached image was taken in July 2015, in Tarangire N.P.

Camera settings: 400mm f5.6 1/125 ISO 200.

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Bush dog

Ruaha, November 2014

 

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johnweir

MAASAI KLIPSPRINGER, Oreotragus schillingsi.

Image taken at dusk in the northern Serengeti near Sayari Camp, July 2015.

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offshorebirder

Suni (multiple individuals) - Nairobi National Park, January 2017.

 

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KaingU Lodge

Not really a sighting per se, but last year we raised a very young common duiker that got separated from her mother and almost killed in a large wild fire that we were fighting. With the aid of a dropper bottle, later a baby bottle, some *elephant* formula from GRI, a LOT of eggs and milk and butter and a lot of patience and work she grew up well. We gradually introduced her to longer and longer stretches in the bush around our house. And eventually she disappeared off on her own as intended. For a long time she would come back in the evening for milk and couch time.

 

She was capable of 2m horizontal leaps onto the couch (to join us watching a movie) and provided endless amusement for the cat - she gave as good as she got! And I can now claim to have had a common duiker regularly confuse my ear for a milk producing organ.

 

I am not an advocate of lodges rearing pets from wild animals, and we never intended her to be a pet. It was either try raise her or leave her a bit burned and on her own with zero chance so we gave it a go. It was an absolutely fascinating insight and an amazing experience.

 

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