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Tom Kellie

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Imani While Eating



~ Photographed on 26 July, 2015 at 3:49 pm in Masai Mara National Reserve, Kenya, with an EOS 1D X camera and an EF 400mm f/2.8L IS II super-telephoto lens.



ISO 200, f/5.6, 1/500 sec., 400mm focal length, handheld Manual exposure.



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I've asked myself which Safaritalk Photography section thread have I consciously sidestepped. I realized that it was ‘Kills’. I've seldom photographed them and Anthony knows I'm not very keen to observe them.



Nevertheless, on the most recent safari, slightly over one month ago, I did observe a kill firsthand. It was a mother cheetah named Imani, who had killed an adult male Thomson's Gazelle, storing it in thick tall grass.



In this image evidence of her eating is visible. Her cubs were with her, although their interest was far more in mother's milk than the blood-stained flesh of the freshly killed gazelle.


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Geoff

I've asked myself which Safaritalk Photography section thread have I consciously sidestepped. I realized that it was ‘Kills’. I've seldom photographed them and Anthony knows I'm not very keen to observe them.

 

 

 

@@Tom Kellie Why is that?

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Tom Kellie

@@Tom Kellie Why is that?

 

~ @@Geoff

 

Severe trauma much earlier in life...

Tom K.

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Geoff

@@Tom Kellie Eek!! Fair enough.

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Wild Dogger

Ndutu January 2013

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Big Andy

@@Wild Dogger Beautiful action shot, with all the dust it really gives the impression of the powerful action and movement.

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Antee

The first one we call:

 

Who is really dead

 

From Serengeti NP , Tanzania

 

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The second one:

 

Size doesn´t matter

 

Somewhere in Madagascar

 

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Tom Kellie

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Killi with a Young Bushbuck



Photographed at 5:40 pm on 18 January, 2016 at Leopard Hills Private Game Reserve, Sabi Sands, South Africa, using an EOS 1D X camera and an EF 400mm f/2.8L IS II super-telephoto lens.


ISO 200, 1/320 sec., f/2.8, 400mm focal length, handheld Manual exposure.


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Killi is a small, young female leopard who hasn't yet raised a litter. She's active, specializing in smaller prey, such as the young bushbuck she killed and was eating, which was photographed soon after the kill.


As we observed and photographed her an elephant herd appeared, heading straight towards her out of the thick growth. She remained with the kill until an elephant was within two meters, then slipped away, returning later to finish her meal.

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Tom Kellie

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Savory



Photographed at 6:48 am on 20 January, 2016 at Leopard Hills Private Game Reserve, Sabi Sands, South Africa, using an EOS 1D X camera and an EF 400mm f/2.8L IS II super-telephoto lens.


ISO 800, 1/640 sec., f/4, 400mm focal length, handheld Manual exposure.


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~ Throughout my 9-day stay at Leopard Hills in January, 2016 there was the ongoing sense that African buffalo were the ‘prey of choice’ for lions, as well as assorted scavengers.


This lioness was savoring her morning meal, with other lionesses doing likewise. At a distance, a lone spotted hyena waited for the opportunity to take a portion of the buffalo carcass.




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pme

March 2013, green season. The last morning at Mana Pools, on the way to the airstrip, but with a few hours to spare. It had been a noisy night before and we knew exactly where to look for the action. Walked in on the pride finishing a kudu bull. Some exceptional guiding by my dear friend Humphrey Gumpo.

 

Canon EOS 1D-X, 600mm f/4 L II, 1/400s, f/6.3, ISO250

 

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kittykat23uk

Sonam on Sambar - Tadoba.

 

25846109752_5bd4658057_k.jpgP3040468 Sonam by Jo Dale, on Flickr

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Game Warden

@@pme I expanded your image by clicking on the thumbnail and copying the image URL into the post. Fantastic eye contact.

 

Matt

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PHALANX

I can't match the photos shown here as I mainly like to film. But I can offer a story.

 

MASAI MARA, EARLY EVENING.

.

We were watching a pride of Lions feeding on a Zebra kill, and we noticed a pair of Oribi acting strangely a short distance away. The way they were acting made us curious so we went to have a look. We stopped a respectful distance away so as not to cause them any unnecessary distress, and started scanning the area for signs of anything unusual. Nothing had changed around the kill, but scanning in front of the Oribi we noticed a movement in the grass ahead of the them. Concentrating hard on that area we saw the movement again and realised there was a young Oribi lying there.

One of the female lion’s, who was laying a little way off from the kill, under a bush, had also been watching the Oribi and we are sure she saw the movement too. She half rose staring intently towards the Oribi. Suddenly the young Oribi stood up, its parents snorting that it should not, and that was the signal for the lioness to launch an attack. The two adult Oribi fled in slightly different directions expecting the youngster to follow one of them, but it dropped back down in to the grass. This action actually confused the Lioness and she stopped, staring ahead not sure where the young Oribi had gone. The Lioness stared towards the two adult Oribi, now standing on the crest of a hill, trying to work out what happened, when suddenly the young Oribi broke cover and ran for its life. The Lioness was after it in an instant but the young Oribi was pretty fast and after a few moments the Lioness gave up. She had obviously fed well from the Zebra kill, and was not going to over exert herself for what would have been no more than dessert.

There was a controlled cheer from us as the young Oribi circled round to meet up with its parents, but, just as we were congratulating the young Oribi on a nice flanking movement, another lioness, which we had not noticed, launched herself from behind a small mound. She must have been watching what had been happening and made the most of the situation as she caught the Young Oribi and brought it down . A loud cry of, Oh no! Echoed from our vehicle but, the Lioness did not kill the young Oribi there and then, no; she carried it back to where there were young Lion cubs playing near to the kill. She dropped it in front of them; the Oribi froze for a second and then ran. The cubs were after it in a flash and soon brought it down. After some playing with it they let it go and chased it again. The young Lions had obviously paid attention when Mum was hunting and they dispatched the young Oribi quickly.

 

It was somewhat like watching a football match. One minute we were 1-0 up, and then the opposition drew level, 1-1, and then they scored the winner in extra time 1-2. AJ.

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PHALANX

BACK OFF!

Oserengoni wildlife sanctuary(formerly Oserian) Naivasha district.

Using a simple Olympus C760UZ: ISO 100, F stop 3.7, at 1/100 sec, Focal length 63mm

It was late evening on our way back to Chui lodge.

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Edited by PHALANX

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PHALANX

Does this count?

 

On my way to breakfast and this Lilac breasted roller was having his on the path outside.

Panasonic HC-V520: f/3.4. 1/750 sec. 24mm.

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cheetah80

30 mins into my first game drive of my first visit to the Masai Mara (or more specifically the Olare Motorogi Conservancy) I saw this ... This is Narasha and photo was taken in September 2013.

 

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Tom Kellie

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Arboreal Mealtime



Photographed on 22 January, 2016 at 8:32 am in Leopard Hills Nature Reserve, Sabi Sands, South Africa, with an EOS 1D X camera and a Zeiss Apo-Sonnar T* 135mm f/2 ZE telephoto lens.



ISO 500, 1/1250 sec., f/4, 135mm focal length, handheld Manual exposure with manual focus.



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After two hours of productive morning wildlife observation and photography, the safari vehicle turned to the south to investigate a reported sighting in a spreading tree.



A mother leopard and her three cubs were safely perched high above the ground, a meal of impala available for breakfast. We watched for more than half an hour, during which time all cubs ate.


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Tom Kellie

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Late Arrival

 

Photographed at 4:37 pm on 6 February, 2014 in Masai Mara National Reserve, Kenya, using an EOS 1D X camera and an EF 400mm f/2.8L IS II super-telephoto lens.

 

ISO 100, 1/2500 sec., f/2.8, 400mm focal length, handheld Manual exposure.

 

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At times one arrives too late to accomplish anything, having more or less missed the boat. This Marabou Stork may have felt that way when examining the bleached skull.

 

The kill having taken place long before, what's left must be fairly slim pickings. Then again, who knows? The stork may have found what others overlooked.

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