Jump to content
michael-ibk

From Dawn Till Dusk - A Botswana Green Season Mobile

Recommended Posts

LarsS
10 hours ago, twaffle said:

I'm reminded that I have my own Botswana TR to complete so this will spur me on.

 

This TR was a reminder for me as well. Got really inspired by this report to start writing my own. Especially now we have reached the Khwai part of the journey, really brings back memories.

 

 

 

Great leopard shots @michael-ibk! You might have had to work a bit, but it really paid off with a nice variation of photos. At first I was really impressed by the way you spotted it... if it were true :D  for me, you don't need an excuse to put in some impala shots, they deserve to be in trip reports.

 

Good sighting of the hippo out of the water. You don't get to see them so clearly out in the open in full daylight.

 

The vultures on the carcass may not be the prettiest sighting, but a special one for sure!

 

 

Where in Khwai did you stay? At one of the Magotho campsites or in an other area?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
michael-ibk
2 minutes ago, LarsS said:

Where in Khwai did you stay? At one of the Magotho campsites or in an other area?

 

Thanks Lars. See, I was just about to ask you the same thing in your report, but will nag you there later. No, in a very different section than Magotho. If we are talking about the same thing - on my map that´s Mogotho and in the very East of Khwai? Our campsite was apparently a pretty new spot, roughly in the Mochaba area,  much more to the North-West and only accessible from the main road connecting Khwai with Chobe and Moremi.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
LarsS
1 minute ago, michael-ibk said:

 

Thanks Lars. See, I was just about to ask you the same thing in your report, but will nag you there later. No, in a very different section than Magotho. If we are talking about the same thing - on my map that´s Mogotho and in the very East of Khwai? Our campsite was apparently a pretty new spot, roughly in the Mochaba area,  much more to the North-West and only accessible from the main road connecting Khwai with Chobe and Moremi.

 

Yes, Mogotho/Magotho. On my map it says Mogotho as well, but I remember our campsite being pointed out as MAG3. Both names mean the same area, apparantly. Indeed in the very east of Khwai. We didn't get into the Mochaba area (I found it on the map), we drove not too far from it though, so may be we've been driving on the same roads if you've been to the east.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
colbol

Hi Guys

Interesting regions you traversed, certainly wetting my appetite to venture into these parts, studying my Tracks 4 Africa Botswana map and plotting your course as you post:D

Nice pic's of the hyeana's and vultures, they don't usually get too much attention some from some people . Must agree -the hippo grazing is a great shot.

Cheers Colbol

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
michael-ibk

Oh absolutely Lars, on our first morning we did the long Khwai river drive and started even East of Mogotho and did pass campsites 1-7 if I am reading my map correctly. That´s a really beautiful campsite you had there so close to the river, great spot! Ours was probably more secluded (in the woodlands) but certainly not as pretty.

 

We enjoyed our morning coffee at one of Khwai´s beautiful lagoons.

 

529_TR_Botswana_2063_Khwai.JPG.8f835baf2b10511d102bb9baa68c7ef7.JPG

 

1594709329_523_TR_Botswana_2041_Khwai_CommonHippopotamus_(Flusspferd).JPG.16a9052bac69cd43158e60df78b91fa1.JPG

 

32954904_524_TR_Botswana_2048_Khwai_CommonHippopotamus_(Flusspferd).JPG.64e50b61cb751d3b3fc838d67c40ffd6.JPG

 

526_TR_IMG_2705.JPG.2b5059ac3a4704b0f57862820342f878.JPG

 

528_TR_Botswana_2058_Khwai.JPG.c865cf4505fc1a624164ed9cfc03338b.JPG

 

525_TR_Botswana_2052_Khwai.JPG.8324c286ff38edcd4dedf45b9d784f20.JPG

 

Later during the day more clouds were gathering, and the beautiful golden green of the morning faded to more muted colours.

 

537_TR_Botswana_2083_Khwai.JPG.4c04c26553d751703e20773f26fcc54f.JPG

 

668621298_539_TR_Botswana_2090_Khwai_ChapmansZebra_(Chapman-Zebra).JPG.37ef570d4f3a85936792133b3fbdfe63.JPG

 

540_TR_Botswana_2096_Khwai_Impala_(Schwarzfersenantilope).JPG.086dd76d60be13006b9409f3410cac4f.JPG

 

Close to the airstrip there are extended floodland plains with hundreds of Red Lechwe. We also hoped to see Wattled Cranes there but only found three very distant birds. Another of my favourites was much more cooperative:

 

2027757460_546_TR_Botswana_2120_Khwai_Saddle-BilledStork_(Sattelstorch).JPG.090c20469ce56519ef169e4d0b2f81fa.JPG

 

A Saddle-Billed Stork. A male here, the female has yellow eyes. We watched it for quite a while, and our patience was rewarded - a successful hunt after all:

 

1805530487_542_TR_Botswana_2105_Khwai_Saddle-BilledStork_(Sattelstorch).JPG.36aa06fe6ef147ad066674dd6d38bcfb.JPG

 

There is still hope!

 

2064603175_543_TR_Botswana_2106_Khwai_Saddle-BilledStork_(Sattelstorch).JPG.c214c77c55eaf4c4d3c98d56482bf385.JPG

 

I can escape, just gotta be quick!

 

176105851_544_TR_Botswana_2107_Khwai_Saddle-BilledStork_(Sattelstorch).JPG.c005dbc4afe62e5ba5c1fa4b8dd2b4a3.JPG

 

That´s what quashed hopes look like. -_-

 

1878002862_548_TR_Botswana_2122_Khwai_RedLechwe_(Letschwe).JPG.83d5851ef12152e6b55ef4a901654b57.JPG

 

I mentioned this area is Red Lechwe central, and lots of them there indeed. I don´t have shotlists for trips in general but one thing I really would have liked to get was one of those iconic Botswana images of a Lechwe jumping a watercourse. In perfect golden morning light of course, with the water splashing. Well, was not to be, all they did was trot around aimlessly and just staring at us with a pretty mean "Look at us all you want, we won´t lift our hooves more than 10 cm from the ground" look.

 

549_TR_IMG_6544.JPG.62455baf9c770de0421a7e7d63d37ff2.JPG

 

1906105594_550_TR_Botswana_2123_Khwai_RedLechwe_(Letschwe).JPG.82322489c996bb4e3274cb8f99f7d50b.JPG

 

I´d get another chance next morning but the bastard Lechwe did not have the decency to wait for the car to stop!

 

1441368037_615_TR_Botswana_2311_Khwai_RedLechwe_(Letschwe).JPG.62ae3caadaf71fcbff8da1cf27099c12.JPG

 

186602541_616_TR_Botswana_2312_Khwai_RedLechwe_(Letschwe).JPG.38d4020c990d709fa119057878685099.JPG

 

Well, as @Alexander33 succinctly put it, a good excuse to get that Lechwe shot properly next time. :)

 

556_TR_Botswana_2138_Khwai.JPG.35d2f6fd668cc901a124d2661644f6f2.JPG

 

469329154_555_TR_Botswana_2137_Khwai_AfricanOpenbillStork_(Mohrenklaffschnabel).JPG.59733fe31e4c655781153d9cab769b3d.JPG

 

African Openbill with its favourite meal.

 

553_TR_IMG_2723.JPG.926a4fc034d22f0323ef3809f549af5d.JPG

 

1268319841_554_TR_Botswana_2134_Khwai_GreaterPainted-Snipe_(Goldschnepfe).JPG.bb8a3a43a83055fc7ce96641021ff630.JPG

 

A very distant shot but a bird I was very happy to see - a Greater Painted-Snipe.

 

557_TR_IMG_6583.JPG.d7f86cf92259444c64d4874979d6a61a.JPG

 

A busy-building Red-Headed Weaver.

 

And that´s enough Khwai from me - back to @Alexander33!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
offshorebirder

Excellent Saddle-billed Stork sequence @michael-ibk.   And the Kudu photos in the previous post were outstanding.   Nice that y'all saw a Red-headed Weaver building a nest.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
colbol

Nice hippo shots and that Weaver is certainly a red hed !! I have not seen one before -so thanks

The saddle billed stork with it’s snack is a great sequence-man those lechwe’s can jump :o how rude not to wait for you guys !!!!

Cheers Colbol 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alexander33
On 6/11/2019 at 12:20 PM, michael-ibk said:

 

What do we have here you ask? A beautiful young Leopardess. :wub:

 

632_TR_Botswana_2355_Khwai_Leopard_(Leopard).JPG.77962f75107e9f3bd34350f4bb899e79.JPG

 

 

 And we were told by other cars where to find this gorgeous animal. ;-)

 

 

 

Indeed, we were told by others where to find the leopard while we were stopped nearby watching these:

 

2000025691_WildDogGeneralI.jpg.14b2be485264617e531de13a75fbf384.jpg

 

 

1828875679_WildDogGeneralII.jpg.7d2aadf578ebc8ec74668c786a312004.jpg

 

 

Doug had received reports of a very large pack of wild dogs in the area, but we’d have to suffice with these (I’m counting 5?), which were lying at the edge of the shade of a large tree and were rather spread out.

 

At one point, one of the dogs got up and made its way toward a nearby pond.  I had hoped that it would spur the other dogs into action, but they stayed put as the stray disappeared into the reeds.  He must have just gone down for a drink, as he soon reappeared and joined back up with his companions in the shade.

 

1705912299_WildDogGeneralIII.jpg.379725247e497c12efc5762a9758fa17.jpg

 

 

728281127_WildDogGeneralIV.jpg.bacf57b15fed2e12de8e54d28a5b223c.jpg

 

 

1166186914_WildDogGeneralV.jpg.b20949e0d5940a365b54826b81c2433d.jpg

 

 

It wasn’t the ideal situation, so I contented myself with making a few portraits.

 

2061925673_WildDogIPSD.jpg.a72021079d91bc079faee60f631c5763.jpg

 

 

1565678541_WildDogIIIPSD.jpg.e05ab84861548dfaa30876ae2c08e090.jpg

 

 

2035302773_WildDogIIPSD.jpg.7e8ec79a5b35f3919ee54dceb97546d6.jpg

 

 

Still, it was great to see wild dogs again, in any number and in any stance, as I hadn’t seen any since a visit to South Africa in 2015.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alexander33

I agree wholeheartedly with @michael-ibk that Khwai was sublimely beautiful.  It really resembled what I had envisioned the Okavango Delta to be like.  Apologies if some of these photos are near-exact duplicates of Michael’s and @AndMic's.

 

2136151328_KhwaiLandscape.WaterI.jpg.21da54927a9c6680e794021bbd4c1fea.jpg

 

 

1676406575_KhwaiLandscape.WaterII.jpg.575dcc427e6a19ef0830a3ca952739fb.jpg

 

 

1645699463_KhwaiLandscape.WaterIII.jpg.4a0ab61da744665347fdab86e4ffd324.jpg

 

 

1000094416_Elephants.Khwai2dDayII.jpg.68aaa2d5074b5bb7b599b80225812aa3.jpg

 

 

1455595144_Elephants.Khwai2dDay.jpg.c28ff748e04ac95738cdf666f1ae142a.jpg

 

 

Elephant Handshake

 

1393450311_ElephantHandshake.jpg.55165a46b32ed07590fb9a2e638c9a46.jpg

 

 

1473460548_Elephant.KhwaiIIPSD.jpg.5944ba39b73cc05faef470e476402012.jpg

 

 

Wide-angle View of Goliath Heron

 

752170724_GoliathHeron.jpg.2d502c43d514c1bcc7ebff25d3e3a3d5.jpg

 

 

African Openbill with Snail

 

15402125_AfricanOpenbillPSD.jpg.c56ccf095e95569375d2064fa09df3c3.jpg

 

 

488860506_HippoIPSD.jpg.0d0d91fb41a8a46a8f7ce770a2e91eb6.jpg

 

 

699168033_HippoIIPSD.jpg.203c747524c5552d4dde9d7df2c2c61b.jpg

 

 

Hyena.jpg.4065dfc91b47dc6680242ecfca64c0db.jpg

 

 

Waterbuck.jpg.90f15288bd730585bb4f2937d2033478.jpg

 

 

Red-headed Weaver Building Nest

 

1767996476_Red-headedWeaverIPSD.jpg.2246bbad7fcda1e1bede1513bf3a63be.jpg

 

 

Woodland Kingfisher, whose beautiful call punctuated the landscape throughout the trip.

 

144969075_WoodlandKingfisherI.jpg.570b673927f4415f6b3b715bf32009bb.jpg

 

 

1682246368_WoodlandKingfisherII.jpg.f78b5f88bf8135ec6ab06b1dd23777b1.jpg

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alexander33

We encountered these flowering vines several times.  This is the flame lily (Gloriosa superba – I don’t normally get into Latin names, but I love that one).  This, incidentally, is the national flower of Zimbabwe.  How’s that for some trivia?

 

1797365703_FlameLilyIPSD.jpg.99ddd95b20d5ddd39ce92d14651de934.jpg

 

 

833477858_FlameLilyIIPSD.jpg.6cc2b14edc6093b7bb609d2d70e57fca.jpg

 

 

1649685818_FlameLilyII.jpg.7a2663308edef3ba07d0b5b212657083.jpg

 

 

Edited by Alexander33

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alexander33

I am not above being exceedingly jealous of Michael’s photos of the Saddle-billed stork gulping down the frog.  No, not at all.

 

My photos of the sighting go from this….

 

1454222093_Saddle-billedStorkIIPSD.jpg.d575c8cf035f6187b41a62824effe67d.jpg

 

 

……to this:

 

369571742_Saddle-billedStorkIII.jpg.126a5a76785454587c97d8ec0bc60d1e.jpg

 

 

My EXIF data shows that over one minute elapsed between these two photos, during which time the stork obviously tossed around and finally swallowed the frog, which Michael captured perfectly in his awesome photos.

 

The question I have is: What in the world was I doing while all the best action was going on???

 

I remember asking Doug what kind of frog the stork had captured, and then making a note of it.  And, upon reflection, yes, I think that’s what I was doing.  While Michael was nailing the fabulous photos, I was talking to Doug and jotting down the frog ID – and, to add insult to injury, for the life of me, I now can’t find the note.

 

Aaargh! 

 

Nice work, Michael.  (No, I’m not jealous in the least).

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alexander33

Shortly before lunch, Doug informed us that a few sleeping male lions had been spotted some distance away.  Did we want to go see them?  In another sign of our compatibility, we all unanimously agreed that, no, we’d prefer to try our luck with something other than sleeping lions in the middle of the day.

 

However, as the sun started to wane, the lions reportedly were still in the same location, and this time, we decided to go find them, in the hope that, as evening came on, they might become more active. When we arrived, there were several vehicles parked in a semi-circle around two male lions splayed out in the brush and moving only occasionally.

 

678973855_LionKhwaiGeneralIV.jpg.ddcea4f83b7bd06c593bf3dfccfe62a1.jpg

 

 

To his credit, Doug suggested that we traverse a small waterway and have our sundowners in the vehicle, on the hunch that if the lions did rouse, they likely would amble toward the channel for a drink, in which we’d be facing them and their reflection in the water.  That suggestion proved most prescient, as one of the lions soon got up and walked straight toward the watercourse, just as Doug had predicted.  Unfortunately, the lion stopped just short of taking a drink, instead lying back down on the cool ground.

 

1141095119_Lion.KhwaiGeneralI.jpg.ff2ea1cfc515a36d55c49f44572e2dc8.jpg

 

 

1372206280_Lion.KhwaiGeneralII.jpg.fe534ba997d672ccc77a1ad499d7aab3.jpg

 

 

1496144194_LionKhwaiGeneralIII.jpg.276e215a35ab95c418596a9c0edbcc62.jpg

 

 

157622277_Lion.KhwaiIPSD.jpg.5fefb6bfa7a6d35f329ed9c19e72181b.jpg

 

 

1668796515_LionKhwaiGeneralV.jpg.8bf7b1a0e51e57aed4620ccea83beca4.jpg

 

 

Still, it was a nice scene to take in as we enjoyed our drinks and reflected on the day. 

As an added bonus, once night fell and we started to make our way back to camp, we intercepted the two lions on the road, one of which decided that the spot right in front of our vehicle was the perfect place to lie down and repeatedly roar into the darkness.  He was so close to the vehicle that I couldn’t even see him over the bonnet.  The incredible, guttural roar of male lion, bellowing into the pitch blackness of the African night – a quintessential African experience and the perfect way to cap our evening drive.

 

Except that our drive wasn’t quite over just yet.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alexander33

One of the things I loved about Khwai, aside from its natural beauty, is the fact that we could take night drives there, the only one of the four locations we stayed where that was possible. 

 

As it turned out, the two lions were not our last cats of the day.

 

1239984952_AfricanWildCat.jpg.22c685b094ba5676978a8e0c535634e1.jpg

 

 

We spent several minutes with this African wild cat as it emerged from behind a termite mound, pausing to sit and groom itself, before disappearing again into the nearby vegetation.

 

Now we could return to camp.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Atravelynn

Hilarious about the frog and your notes, @Alexander33.   The wildcat at night helped make up for it. 

The rufous bellied heron flapping was a great catch.

I admire your "More Impala in reports" spirit, @michael-ibk.

Nice macros on the national flower of Zimbabwe.  One more reason to love the green season!

 

Khwai is lovely, especially in your nice weather.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Africalover

Fantastic TR - love reading it, but why  would one bring in a top notch guide from Zimbabwe.

Botswana has many fantastic local guides. I have always used locals and always had lots of super sightings.

No offense , just curious 😀

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alexander33

@Africalover

 

I will let @michael-ibk expound, as he and @AndMic set up the arrangements, but they had been guided by Doug on several occasions before (and not just in Zimbabwe) and had developed a good relationship with him. No matter how qualified a particular guide is, there’s always a certain leveling in that you have to go through the first time you are paired together. That can take several days or even longer. Sometimes, there can be a level of comfort in being guided by someone whom you know, because of past experience, will already be primed to focus on your specific interests and preferences from the very start. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ice

to add some info:

 

the pack of 5 dogs was most likely the (usually) resident Khwai Pack. Last year in July they consisted of 13 adults and 12 pups. A few months later they apparently split up, though. 

 

The bigger pack consisted of 12 dogs when I saw them around Easter this year, half a dozen adults and half a dozen subadults from last year's den. They are called Mababe Pack, because that's the area / concession they usually hang around. However, given the low number of members in the Khwai Pack, it seems like the Mababe Pack has taken over their traditional territory as well, driving the Khwai Pack deep into Moremi (which is, for those who don't know the area that well, on the other side of the Khwai River).

 

The female leopard might very well be who the guides call "Magotho Female", if she was seen in the area near the campsites. She's a daughter of Mmatsebe, a very famous leopard in Botswana.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ice

part of the Mababe Pack in April 2019, near Khwai River

21 Fotos Klaus Panasonic 12.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alexander33

@ice

 

Thanks so much for this background information!  It adds a lot of helpful context. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ice

sure thing

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
michael-ibk

@Africalover

 

Pretty much what @Alexander33 said. Certainly don´t want to give the impression that it´s in any way necessary to bring in an external guide for a mobile to Bots. As I mentioned Matambo (from Letaka Safaris) was a great guy and an excellent guide on his own, and I´m sure we would have had a fantastic time only with him just as well. And we have plenty of Bots mobile reports  here on Safaritalk which all prove that the local guides are always doing a super job. We simply enjoy Doug´s guiding style and company, he knows very well what we like to do on safari (my birding craze for example), we chatted about Botswana during our last Zim safari together and one thing lead to another - and the surcharge for having him along was very reasonable.

 

@ice

 

Good to know more about our predators, thank you. Matambo mentioned some of this stuff but since I long stopped taking notes on safari forgot all of it.:)

Edited by michael-ibk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
michael-ibk
14 hours ago, Alexander33 said:

As an added bonus, once night fell and we started to make our way back to camp, we intercepted the two lions on the road, one of which decided that the spot right in front of our vehicle was the perfect place to lie down and repeatedly roar into the darkness.  He was so close to the vehicle that I couldn’t even see him over the bonnet.  The incredible, guttural roar of male lion, bellowing into the pitch blackness of the African night – a quintessential African experience and the perfect way to cap our evening drive.

 

1585014339_592_TR_Botswana_2247_Khwai_Lion_(Lwe).JPG.114e4dd4bec0e769fb01b3122a8eab1b.JPG

 

That was a pretty cool thing indeed. It´s been a while since I had a Lion go in full roaring mode that close, really goes all through your body. Just turn up the volume and you´ll get an idea what it was like:

 

 

Peter mentioned how much Khwai met his expectations on what the Delta would be like. Indeed, what´s more "Delta" than swimming cars?

 

566_TR_Botswana_2171_Khwai.JPG.0ab5cb283c09fd5fc50653a9f38ffecc.JPG

 

Or Jacanas and Lilies?

 

1064754006_571_TR_Botswana_2194_Khwai_AfricanJacana_(Blaustirn-Blatthhnchen).JPG.dd316222f0075c4210501da2444f7ec3.JPG

 

Or just all-about great lush scenery?

 

574_TR_Botswana_2199_Khwai.JPG.ad30efd79bb8dd618dd30f8dbe1a8433.JPG

 

Some more photos - find Waldo!

 

533084580_577_TR_Botswana_2204_Khwai_NileCrocodile_(Nilkrokodil).JPG.8f82a5d535ea911a33de931b2c12c915.JPG

 

2051205655_561_TR_Botswana_2157_Khwai_ChacmaBaboon_(Brenpavian).JPG.cfc81b8720759171bea6d82ef3b10074.JPG

 

Lazy Baboons

 

1932622221_570_TR_Botswana_2187_Khwai_SouthernReedbuck_(Groriedbock).JPG.c144795182d31a1c55a4d794627aef8d.JPG

 

Reedbuck, surprisingly common and approachable in Khwai

 

218310509_572_TR_Botswana_2196_Khwai_SouthernReedbuck_(Groriedbock).JPG.e43e3c84623726294c5d0ac6fe38a503.JPG

 

Very easy to hide in the long grass but this was one was relaxed enough to not bother.

 

481676176_573_TR_Botswana_2197_Khwai_Long-ToedLapwing_(Langzehenkiebitz).JPG.fba6ec039462f47bd3a8e0fb4e902658.JPG

 

Long-Toed Lapwing

 

1336345731_578_TR_Botswana_2207_Khwai_MartialEagle_(Kampfadler).JPG.b93b032823045272358c8703c983cfd2.JPG

 

Martial Eagle, one of Africa´s most powerful birds of prey.

 

1305052103_579_TR_Botswana_2211_Khwai_MartialEagle_(Kampfadler).JPG.df37c5313ca723d15201701a2b32dd79.JPG

 

1580028132_580_TR_Botswana_2214_Khwai_MartialEagle_(Kampfadler).JPG.1dbe6ab9373e7d49599d01f1dff0c704.JPG

 

591_TR_IMG_2747.JPG.c90852d4a9fd69dc57041cf774c83b26.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
michael-ibk

Time to finish the Khwai chapter:

 

596_TR_IMG_2751.JPG.a576583528f0a31417672e1e3bed9a10.JPG

 

597_TR_IMG_2755.JPG.d7b6ec8085dd9ef6e7299eb97f3095fb.JPG

 

560353657_595_TR_Botswana_2260_Khwai_Double-BandedSandgrouse_(Nachtflughuhn).JPG.d40197b9ebd15189f24e477abba8aa49.JPG

 

Double-Banded Sandgrouse

 

563_TR_Botswana_2165_Khwai.JPG.e84ef5fab0797d4cdc671c8ae7a73060.JPG

 

1310319849_598_TR_Botswana_2266_Khwai_GreaterKudu_(GroerKudu).JPG.bc9fea9301e8191f20ef374ee620f87f.JPG

 

Kudu are among my top three Antelopes (with Sable and Gemsbok), so it was a good thing that they enjoyed posing in the morning light.

 

600_TR_IMG_6676.JPG.21026aeb2d9852fb22c089d8b3b87040.JPG

 

One of our last sightings was a rather sad one:

 

641_TR_Botswana_2403_Khwai_Tsessebe_(Sassaby).JPG.ed5b9fcb217c425ff6d36b4303c5a9f3.JPG

 

This Tsessebe calf was a bold little thing, and did its very best to try to follow its mother. But its right frontleg was obviously broken. And Khwai with all its Lions, Dogs and Leopards is certainly not a place which is kind on helpless little things. I´m afraid it won´t have made it through the night.

 

Yes, I am a cheerful guy, ain´t I? To change the mood:

 

956410018_602_TR_Botswana_2274_Khwai_Yellow-BilledOxpecker_(Gelbschnabel-Madenhacker).JPG.d9c7083693022e61010f4f66047d3822.JPG

 

I hope you all went "Eeeew" right now and forgot about the doomed Tsessebaby.B)

 

604_TR_IMG_2759.JPG.4e1ecb89f4d50dd0a9af48d354cea2d2.JPG

 

I´m not only working on Impala respect, Waterbuck deserve more appreciation just as well:

 

1541005738_605_TR_Botswana_2286_Khwai_CommonWaterbuck_(Ellipsen-Wasserbock).JPG.999b95708e6b4164c997a5fc105336ee.JPG

 

526112096_606_TR_Botswana_2288_Khwai_CommonWaterbuck_(Ellipsen-Wasserbock).JPG.927bfc58e5173a4df7ce80d39c788cfa.JPG

 

It´s a tricky thing to look regal with a toilet seat on your bum but this guy just about manages to pull this off:

 

680582790_607_TR_Botswana_2291_Khwai_CommonWaterbuck_(Ellipsen-Wasserbock).JPG.6cee2629c633b86b4c40f51ee557d83e.JPG

 

1190605352_608_TR_Botswana_2296_Khwai_CommonWaterbuck_(Ellipsen-Wasserbock).JPG.10359268832bf3476a8af99bd4fddc02.JPG

 

610_TR_IMG_6712.JPG.ff89b2acd445bf4d73e884d2a4570cef.JPG

 

Another iconic African bird - Fish Eagle. We saw lots of them but they were not particularly accommodating this time, no really close photo opportunities.

 

1828454875_611_TR_Botswana_2308_Khwai_AfricanFishEagle_(Schreiseeadler).JPG.02ed97b07d4d44e90449251818a0cb84.JPG

 

Not as famous but even more common and giving us a better show - Yellow-Billed Kite.

 

1797627556_629_TR_Botswana_2350_Khwai_Yellow-BilledKite_(Schmarotzermilan).JPG.fde74179bdb1e4843453253953c40b70.JPG

 

Purple Roller

 

1545147087_562_TR_Botswana_2159_Khwai_PurpleRoller_(Strichelracke).JPG.e4c81601fe81726735043e2b064ba2ce.JPG

 

African Sacred Ibis

 

29887943_636_TR_Botswana_2371_Khwai_SacredIbis_(HeiligerIbis).JPG.c0c134aa1699e2c8bacb49844f5cb103.JPG

 

612_TR_IMG_2766.JPG.2e2988d6ca8898c0b4b87956deaf6a9b.JPG

 

Onwards and upards now - let´s cross the Bridge on the River Khwai and move on to Moremi!

 

Edited by michael-ibk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alexander33

We tend to prefer traveling slowly.  Only once can I recall thinking that I had scheduled too much time in a single locale, and that was certainly not on this trip.  This comparatively was quite a fast-paced trip for us, and I would happily return to spend more time in any and all of the four areas we explored.  But of all of them, I was most reluctant to leave Khwai.  We had only two nights, and I could have spent a week there.

 

However, it was time to move on, and Moremi awaited us.  We reached the Khwai River and crossed it to commence our journey forward.

 

795100678_KhwaiSign.jpg.f6445cef30cc1979c660f9c3f88ee364.jpg

 

 

996410012_KhwaiBridge.jpg.fca20683bf3211b4545605063b05467b.jpg

 

 

I mentioned in the Savuti section of this report that I tend to identify a photographic target and then stick with it until the bitter end.  In this case, the target presented itself just as we were transitioning from Khwai into Moremi.

 

1450809092_GreenWood-hoopoeI.jpg.5a7620ee0b4d83279a72f157931facf3.jpg

 

 

This green wood-hoopoe presented itself in beautiful light and with a perfect pose to entice me. But there’s that annoying branch and the busy side elements that detract, and from this point forward, I made it a goal to nail a good green wood-hoopoe photo.

 

And that was the moment that the gods started laughing, and giving me things like this:

 

502955156_GreenWood-hoopoeII.jpg.b95bf432cbe5e5a4c76a9d15ed1c3a58.jpg

 

 

Wonderful opportunities in deplorable conditions.  Poor @michael-ibkand @AndMic would now have to put up with my insisting we stop at every possible opportunity for me to get a good photo of a green wood-hoopoe.  Would I find success?

 

(Hint: No. But I would never give up.  Poor Michael and Andreas.)

 

Moremi awaited.

 

Edited by Alexander33

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alexander33

As we made our way, the landscape became more arid, and the challenges became even more vexing.  We came across this Verreaux’s Eagle-Owl and African Paradise Flycatcher in the same stand of trees.  Good to see, but hard to photograph.  (I’ve been after that Paradise Flycatcher for years, and still no success.).

 

993248496_EagleOwlI.jpg.0d60c6bc0eee22666866467199594cae.jpg

 

 

1172903475_ParadiseFlycatcher.jpg.8919b6a52c941f80968793064c607c59.jpg

 

 

A small group of wattled cranes kept their distance.

 

989072411_WattledCrane.jpg.b9fc2a5e37f6fda3d6fe58c2424e0eb0.jpg

 

 

It took longer than we expected to reach our intended spot for lunch.  It was almost 3:00 when we finally stopped at a point beside a large waterway.  We took some time afterward to explore, and came across these black egrets hunting in their peculiar style. 

 

They would stalk their prey, and then use their wings like an umbrella just as they went in for the kill.

 

1214954557_BlackEgretIII.jpg.66b3e2063a4cc7ce2462fbba92ebb6e8.jpg

 

 

704868696_BlackEgretII.jpg.0b03ad52f05bfe7e4ffa4b4abd5e5094.jpg

 

 

512681949_BlackEgretVI.jpg.2e024071c5fddef9a708a864c51e52e6.jpg

 

 

86331508_BlackEgretIV.jpg.a8a47240b0122d39781c5e3e5913483f.jpg

 

 

299140767_BlackEgretI.jpg.f0fbf9a3fe35e9ed7d429e362db7cc77.jpg

 

 

2056820637_BlackEgretV.jpg.cbe9ae5c14f2951c8e972b704c10c5df.jpg

 

 

444428975_BlackEgretVII.jpg.26bcde1db1b003531853048579a78a0d.jpg

 

 

I have to confess that, by this point, I was quite weary.  The photos aren’t the best, and the conditions weren’t what I would have preferred, so even though I had wanted to see this behavior for a long time, I feel like I just wasn’t entirely into it at the time.

 

Maybe @michael-ibk was better inspired than I was at the time.  I know from taking a peek at his Big Year posts that he has additional information to share on this interesting bird.

 

No pressure!

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Safaritalk uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. By using Safaritalk you agree to our use of cookies. If you wish to refuse the setting of cookies you can change settings on your browser to clear and block cookies. However, by doing so, Safaritalk may not work properly and you may not be able to access all areas. If you are happy to accept cookies and haven't adjusted browser settings to refuse cookies, Safaritalk will issue cookies when you log on to our site. Please also take a moment to read the Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy: Terms of Use l Privacy Policy