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Atravelynn

Deserts, Dunes, Waterholes, Wildlife, Views, Vistas. Namibia.

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africawild

The day by day itinerary on Page 1, Post #18 is entirely accurate. June 20 and 21 are off by a day in the narration. I typically lose track of time on about Day 4 of a trip, so I am remaining true to form in my report.

 

ETOSHA - 2nts Okaukeujo, 1 nt Halali, 3 nts Onguma in Namutoni Area

 

Place of dry water; Great white place; Endless white pan; The place where no plants grow. Lots of translations for Etosha, all descriptive.

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attachicon.gifFirst day in Ok, paritial day, partial grid.jpg

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Nerownii Waterhole, Okaukeujo

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Black Rhino right off the bat at Nebrownii Waterhole, Okaukeujo. This guy is often nearby.

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Herd near Ombika Waterhole, Okaukeujo. Getting close to park closing time at sunset.

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Sunset at the Okaukeujo Waterhole

 

 

 

Can you believed we picked exactly the same accommodation and same number of nights in Etosha !!!

 

Your report is great by the way , so much information and so many great pictures !!!

 

Enjoying very much and also refreshing many memories .

 

 

Paco

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graceland

AMAZING.....and to think you can keep track of all this. I never know what day it is (nor do I want to) when on safari....

As a matter, I have no idea what today is after moving two days ago....I feel like two weeks have passed and need a safari fix. :o

 

Your pics just make me want to be there; but since I am not; I do feel it!

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Atravelynn

@Paco, you know what they say about great minds. But the # of nights was influenced by you in a discussion long ago. I don't think 6 nts in Etosha was excessive at all. 60 might be.

 

@@graceland, between jetlag and moving it's a wonder you can even find your way to safaritalk, much less begin your report! This is the place for your fix!

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madaboutcheetah

Oh Wow - Now Namibia gets higher on my list ....... I'd guess the landscapes are the big draw of Namibia - but, with game concentrations in Etosha that you've captures so very well ........Amazing! Love that image of the waterhole scene in wide-angle!!!

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Atravelynn

And you might even find a cheetah, @@madaboutcheetah. I think Damaraland has the greatest number of free roaming cheetah outside of designated parks.

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Time to give the birds some "air" time. The plover a is Double Banded Plover I believe. Then to the right, a young Moorhen, perhaps. Martial Eagle and Purple Roller on bottom left. Double Banded Sandgrouse face

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Common Rock Kestral Greater Kestral

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Pied Crow

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Moringa Waterhole at Halali Campgrounds

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Moringa Waterhole at Halali Campground

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Lion at Salvadora, Halali Area Giraffe in Halali Kudu at Moringa Waterhole, Halali Campground

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Ian knew these big boys patrolled the area around Okerfontein Waterhole, Namutoni and they had a set route they liked to follow.

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White Elephant near Chudop Waterhole, Namutoni

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How they make white elephants - Chudop Waterhole, Namutoni

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Klein Okevi Waterhole, Namutoni Between Halali and Namutoni there's a spot to drive out on the pan. And you can walk on it too.

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To be continued

Edited by Atravelynn

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twaffle

Atravelynn, You've done Namibia proud. Lovely selection of photos and great information. What a resource for the future for people like me who've yet to go.

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Bush dog

Great pictures, Lynn, especially the birds' images. I love the pied crow and the 3 last panoramic with a girafe on each.

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Atravelynn

Thank you @@twaffle & @@Bush dog.

 

The report will be concluded end of Oct.

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Marks

I particularly like your LBR in flight (pun and all) and your dusting elephants.

Also, thanks for the details on your notes. That's something I want to work on for myself.

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Kitsafari

Finally catching up with your TR.

 

the landscapes and meerkats are awesome in #59. as are the later waterholes pictures. I suppose it is true that game density is low in Namibia but it's astonishingly high at the waterholes!

Edited by Kitsafari

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graceland

@@Atravelynn, Craig suggest this as out next adventure. Your report certainly helps out :D

You must never sleep on safari....too much going on!

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pault

Still catching up,but great so far. Your pictures get better every time I think, although Namibia is very photogenic I guess. I love the waterhole pictures, especially the elephants in the water. However, those mongooses and the landscapes and everything (including the men in fluorescent jackets and hard hats of course) are all such a good accompaniment to the report.

 

Your descriptions and photos do make me want to return. Is there anywhere else particularly good to visit in December apart from Cape Cross?

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FlyTraveler

Lots to catch up for me with your great TR and photos. Your trip reports are not for reading, they are for studying, @@Atravelynn! Thanks for sharing and presenting such a pleasant and useful TR!

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michael-ibk
Theories on how the horses got there include:

- Survivors of a shipwreck, then they traveled inland

- Escapees from a baron’s stud farm

- South African Army horses lost in battle

 

There was a lovely documentary focusing on the "Namibs", the horses on TV yesterday here. It was stated that all horses were leftovers from the First World War battles, and belonged to the German army.

Edited by michael-ibk

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Atravelynn

 

Is there anywhere else particularly good to visit in December apart from Cape Cross?

Don't know the answer. I think the dunes are always good.

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Soukous

I've just caught up with your Namibia TR @Atravelynn

very informative and some wonderful sightings - thanks for sharing

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Atravelynn

Thanks for the German horse perspective, @@michael-ibk. Whatever their origin, I noted how uniform in color they were. All were shades of brown, a couple black ones, and a few lighter manes.

 

You are most welcome @@Soukous.

 

You can study, but won't be subjected to a quiz @@FlyTraveler. I am very interested in your Ruaha report.

 

@@graceland, I apologize for sleeping. Eyes and ears open 24/7!

 

I'm glad the spreadsheet makes sense, @@Marks.

 

It is all happening at the waterholes, @@Kitsafari, if I may steal a Simon & Garfunkel line. If not AT the holes, then usually nearby, like these herds in their way to get a drink.

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Black faced impala maintaining the right of way enroute to a waterhole, Namutoni Springbok on their way to a Namutoni waterhole. The springbok of the Kalahari It's all happening at the waterhole--Klein Namutoni

have pointier hooves because the sand does not file them down. In contrast,

the springbok of Etosha have hooves manicured by the courser terrain underfoot.

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Exception to the waterhole rule: Near the road, not near a waterhole. Halali

Edited by Atravelynn

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TonyQ

@@Atravelynn

It is good to see some more - I think the waterholes are amazing

And great to have such a good view of that leopard!

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Atravelynn

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Family of black backed jackals observed from the viewing deck at Onguma (Namutoni area) in the early morning before leaving for the park.

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Spitting Cobra. I was wearing glasses and photographed through the open window. Steenbok Namutoni Area Hyena Namutoni Area

Without glasses, Ian suggested it would be wise to roll up the window--

something to consider if driving yourself. Namutoni Area

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Right after entering Namutoni

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Twee Palms Waterhole, Namutoni - translates to 2 palms and there they are.

 

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Lilac Breasted Roller Northern Black Korhan Glossy Starlings

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7 Up Banded Mongoose Groot Okevi, Namutoni

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7 Up a Little more Alet - Banded Mongoose Groot Okevi, Namutoni

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All 8 are out - Banded Mongoose Groot Okevi, Namutoni

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Grey Louries, Namutoni Klein Namutoni Double banded Sandgrouse, Namutoni

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Kudu, right after entering Namutoni

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These dik dik are at the start of Dik Dik Drive near Klein Namutoni.

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White Elephant at Okerfontaine, Namutoni

To be continued

Edited by Atravelynn

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michael-ibk

Love the Banded Mongoose, such a special shot! :)

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Soukous

wonderful banded mongooses @@Atravelynn

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TonyQ

@@Atravelynn

The mongoose shots are beautiful - but so are your pictures of the dik dik! The family of Jackals interacting looks really interesting as well.

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Kitsafari

love the jackals, the mongoose and the dik diks.

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Atravelynn

Funny how the little ratty mongoose can be a trip highlight, which it was for me. Their posing in nice light won me over.

 

Onguma Activities

Etosha activities are almost entirely traditional game drives, so an opportunity to add something different was appealing; and Onguma offered several options. No one else joined me on any activities so Onguma is to be commended for allowing me to participate without an extra charge, even though the stated minimum is 2 persons. Ian booked the activities by phone a day or two before arriving and I paid upon checkout at Onguma.

 

Night drive in open vehicle: Not much luck. Lots of steenbok, not much else. I did the night drive my second night of a three night stay at Onguma.

 

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Onguma vehicle

 

“Rhino Tracking/Rhino Research Drive:” This is not done on foot but in the open vehicle in an area of the park that is not accessible for other activities. You drive to a waterhole in the late afternoon that is often visited by rhino. Then you wait silently for several hours into the dark. It was interesting watching and waiting in silence as the day ended and the night began. We saw numerous antelope and birds, but no rhino showed. The success rate is about 50%. Before heading to the waterhole, rhino conservation and anti-poaching efforts were explained by the guide. I found it interesting that some private reserves in South Africa were poisoning the rhino horns with a substance that did not hurt the rhinos but would harm humans if they consumed the horns. There had been a few illnesses and I think even one death from these tainted poached rhino horns. The hope was word would get out that rhino horns could not be trusted as safe to ingest.

 

I did the rhino research drive my third night of a three night stay at Onguma.

 

 

Morning walk: About 6:00-8:00 am, starting out walking into the rising sun when it is very low and then walking with the sun at your back when it is higher and brighter in the sky. Very smart. An armed guide accompanies. I thought this was an excellent activity and one of the better camp walks I have done.

 

I did the morning walk on my final morning of a three night stay at Onguma. It allowed enough time to have breakfast and then leave at 9:00 for Okonjima.

 

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My Mom thinks my shadow looks like Indiana Jones - Me on a walk at Onguma Black backed jackal seen on a walk at Onguma Warthog seen on a walk at Onguma

 

 

June 2014 prices:

Sundowner drive: N$420.00

Onguma night drive: N$320.00

Guided walking safari: N$320.00

Rhino Research drive: N$540.00

Edited by Atravelynn

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Atravelynn

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Back to Groot Okevi to see the Mongoose Family, Namutoni



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Baby peeking from behind



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Three herds of elephants, plus a few stragglers, continually entered the water, played in the water, and chased off the other herds for about an hour at Klein Namutoni.



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