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Tsavo West, Amboseli, Meru & Samburu — January, 2015


Tom Kellie

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Tom Kellie

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Hirundo senegalensis and Hirundo abyssinica at Repose



~ Outside of my cottage's covered terrace and up in the neighboring cottage's tree were both Hirundo senegalensis, Mosque Swallow, and Hirundo abyssinica, Lesser Striped Swallow.



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Swallows Roosting After Dawn



They ruffled their feathers, preened, made small cheeping cries and rustled around a bit. I enjoyed watching the two species together, seemingly without rancor or disdain towards one another.



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Bradornis microrhynchus with Bill Pointed Upward



When I made this image, I felt pleased as I supposed that it was my only opportunity to observe Bradornis microrhynchus, African Grey Flycatcher. Subsequent events would disprove my unfounded assumption.



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Accipter badius Perched Above Ni's Cottage



Waiting for Ni to join me for breakfast, I spotted Accipter badius, Shikra, perched above Ni's cottage.



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Beijing to Nairobi Lights Out on EY 889 ~ After my safari partner, Peking University medical student and researcher, XU Ni, 徐铌, rendezvoused at my Beijing campus apartment, we r

Quenching And then there were elephants...by the dozen! We rounded a tight bend to head onward to the lodge when Loxodonta africana in force appeared. They were hustling along, as if urgency co

Madoqua kirkii Pair ~ Just the two of them. Nothing else in sight. Small. Wary. Yet not so anxious. Madoqua kirkii, Kirk's Dikdik in the tall grass beside a Tsavo West track. Nothing fancy, yet

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Tom Kellie

Paraxerus ochraceus




To the left of the small porch beside the terrace of my cottage


a tree grew with long, thick branches. At 7:12 am there was a


brief flash of color on the branch. It happens that since birth


I've had no vision in my left eye, seeing only with my right


eye. Therefore I turned my head all the way to see what


had caused the motion. It was Paraxerus ochraceus,


Ochre Bush Squirrel. These ISO 640 images were made


with the 400mm super telephoto lens, showing the


scampering, running motion of the energetic squirrel.




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Paraxerus ochraceus and Yellow Lichen



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Paraxerus ochraceus Headed Downward



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Paraxerus ochraceus Skeedaddles!


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twaffle

 

We hadn't seen any Lamprotornis superbus, Superb Starling, for two hours and were in a remote dry area when this single bird flew up and perched on a flowering branch of Delonix elata. The intense yet subtle beauty of the juxtaposition of bird and blooms struck a powerful chord within me. As politely as I could manage, despite inner excitement, I asked Anthony to please back, back, back up...there! He hadn't seen, but when I pointed it out he took out his camera to join me in photograph the improbably lovely moment in remote Tsavo West National Park.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

attachicon.gifSafari Nirvana.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Safari Nirvana

 

 

 

Surely the most refined photographic composition my lens saw during the entire visit in Tsavo West National Park. It expresses an East African safari counterpart to the classical brush paintings of nature made in ancient China and Japan.

This image is dedicated to the ladies of Safaritalk who've been so gracious, encouraging, helpful, humorous and kindhearted during my first 3+ weeks as a Safaritalk member. The beauty of endemic Delonix elata flowers and Lamprotornis elata plumage is especially for @@twaffle, @@wilddog, @@kittykat23uk, @@Atravelynn, @@graceland, @@Sangeeta, @@Patty, @@ld1, @@SafariChick, @@Kitsafari, @@Tdgraves and @@wenchy. Asante sana and merci beaucoup to each of you.

Thank you for this gift of beauty, I would LOVE to have an image like this in my files. Stunning!

 

I'm enjoying all your photos but especially the birds and smaller creature, like the butterflies. So often we just don't take the time.

 

The lively commentary just adds to your unique vision through the lens. Excellent.

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Kitsafari

Tom, i've yet to see lesser kudus so it was once again so good to see it through other people's eyes.

 

I love the elephant series, all looking calm and relaxed. and that's a beautiful frontal shot of the lovely black shouldered kite.

 

sorry that the rhino sanctuary was a washout but I'm with you, even sitting in the absence of animals. the bush is still a serene place to soak up the spiritual tranquility.

 

the two cliffs in your perilous habitat posting look so lifelike, similar to faces on a totem pole.

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Kitsafari

and i love those images of the elephants in the dusk making their way to the waterhole. give me a place to stay where elephants (or hyenas or lions or jackals or any wildlife) wander around or close to your abode over any place with a private pool or massage or hair salon services anytime.

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Tom Kellie

 

Thank you for this gift of beauty, I would LOVE to have an image like this in my files. Stunning!

 

I'm enjoying all your photos but especially the birds and smaller creature, like the butterflies. So often we just don't take the time.

 

The lively commentary just adds to your unique vision through the lens. Excellent.

 

 

~ @twaffle:

 

After a long sleep I've returned to the computer to complete posting the remaining Tsavo West images.

The first post I saw was yours — wonderful!

Thank you for your especially thoughtful comments. They're such a happy way to begin the day.

I agree with you that the ‘little guys’ at the bottom of the food chain sometimes have as much beauty as those magnificent keystone predators.

The Tsavo West series may be nearly finished, but a few of the finest experiences turned out to be last, as will be evident.

With Appreciation,

Tom K.

Edited by Tom Kellie
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Tom Kellie

Tom, i've yet to see lesser kudus so it was once again so good to see it through other people's eyes.

 

I love the elephant series, all looking calm and relaxed. and that's a beautiful frontal shot of the lovely black shouldered kite.

 

sorry that the rhino sanctuary was a washout but I'm with you, even sitting in the absence of animals. the bush is still a serene place to soak up the spiritual tranquility.

 

the two cliffs in your perilous habitat posting look so lifelike, similar to faces on a totem pole.

 

~ @Kitsafari:

 

You've surprised me by mentioning that lesser kudus haven't yet been part of your rich safari experience.

All the more reason to head to Changi and return to Africa...as if you or I ever needed any excuse for doing so!

Lesser kudu probably are the most elegant larger animal I've seen. During the past year I've observed and photographed lesser kudu about half a dozen time, each time a game drive highlight.

The least flamboyant of antelopes, their appearances on the savannah stage are transitory, at best.

As it happened my Chinese medical student completed his ‘Big Five’ later in the safari, when we had ample rhino sightings.

The downpour in the Tsavo West Rhino Sanctuary remains a jovial memory, one of those “Remember when we were in the Rhino Sanctuary and it poured rain like a Singapore afternoon downpour?” moments.

I'm so glad that you liked them.

Tom K.

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Tom Kellie

and i love those images of the elephants in the dusk making their way to the waterhole. give me a place to stay where elephants (or hyenas or lions or jackals or any wildlife) wander around or close to your abode over any place with a private pool or massage or hair salon services anytime.

 

~ @Kitsafari:

 

Absolutely!

Who needs another swanky shopping arcade with the usual selection of name brands, when there are campfires around which bushbabies call, jackals lurk or leopards silently walk past?

Tom K.

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Tom Kellie

The visit to Tsavo West National Park was comfortable in large


measure due to the laid-back yet considerate hospitality of


the Rhino Valley Lodge. From the ample candles provided


for use when the generator was off to the well-maintained


facilities, the lodge was more than satisfactory. Special


credit to Onesimus of the restaurant whose friendliness


made every meal a cheerful experience. It was also the


first place to ever serve raw passionfruit — superb!




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Night Light with Outstanding Reliable Farasi Matches



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View Towards Room #6



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Walking Path to the Lodge's Restaurant with Elephant-trampled Grass



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Crossandra subacaulis



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Warm Drinks for Breakfast



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Onesimus of Rhino Valley Lodge



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Fresh Passionfruit



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Mangos at Rhino Valley Lodge



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Rhino Valley Lodge Weaver Nests

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Tom Kellie

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Quelea quelea on Bare Branches



~ It might be fun if @@Game Warden were to start a topic titled: “How can you tell right away that someone else you meet on safari is a safari veteran?” The variety of replies would no doubt be both humorous and to the point. I might answer: “If they recognize this species, in its flocks of hundreds or even thousands, and say ‘those are just quelea’, with no further ado, they're a safari veteran”.



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Female and Male Quelea quelea



I'd never read about or heard mention of Quelea quelea until I was in a skiff on Lake Baringo, Kenya, in February, 2014. The guide answered my question about a small flock of birds, saying that they were red-billed quelea. Since then the largest flocks of quelea that I've seen were in Meru National Park, Kenya in January, 2015, as will later be shown in this trip report.



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Rhino Valley Vidua macroura



Easy to photograph, easy to spot, easy to like. This male Vidua macroura, Pin-tailed Whydah, in breeding plumage was singing.



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Rhino Valley Lodge Room #5, Where I Stayed



A look back at where I stayed, which was the cottage on the left. This photo was taken on the track leading away from the lodge, on our way out of Tsavo West National Park.



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Rhino Valley Lodge Dining Area



The open air dining area's view over Rhino Valley provided an emotional uplift at each meal. I'd be delighted to return in the future.



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Aquila wahlbergi



Another surprise from bird-studded Rhino Valley. Aquila wahlbergi, Wahlberg's Eagle, perched atop a tree. We heard its cry, which was shrill and drawn out.



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Male Vidua paradisaea



Wouldn't you know it? Our final bird sighting in Rhino Valley was none other than a male Vidua paradisaea, Eastern Paradise-Whydah, his resplendent tail feathers on full display.





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Tom Kellie

Syncerus caffer in Tsavo West



Throughout our visit to Tsavo West National Park we saw


Syncerus caffer, African Buffalo, in excellent condition. What


was striking was their comparatively unruffled reactions to our


presence. Mothers with young didn't immediately bolt away or


form a defensive ring, as we later repeatedly witnessed in Meru


National Park. Their cool take on safari visitors made possible


these close range photographs, taken in morning light, shortly


after leaving Rhino Valley. XU Ni spotted the large gathering


of African Buffalo shown in the panorama image.




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“Hey, We Were Having Breakfast!”



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Syncerus caffer with Grass Stalk



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We've All Had Days Like This



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Eating Is Bliss



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Syncerus caffer at Very Close Range



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Unintimidated



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Syncerus caffer Calf



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Tsavo West Syncerus caffer Panorama



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Solitary Aged Male African Buffalo

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Tom Kellie

The slightly dusty track Anthony selected appeared to be seldom


traveled. No tire tracks nor any signs of recent use. There were


abundant blooming wildflowers on the margins, which pleased


me. No animals until this small elephant family was spotted


just off the track. We stop for elephants, period. The


youngest elephant behaved with considerable overt


curiosity about our presence, using its trunk to


test the air for any signs of trouble.




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Four Meters Away



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Tusks



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A Most Sensitive Trunk in Action



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Testing the Air for Scents of Interest

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Tom Kellie

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Chatterbox



~ Despite lovely Coracias garrulus, European Rioller, having been the signature bird species of our visit to Tsavo West National Park, I'd felt dissatisfied with the images I'd had of it, due to excessively bright backgrounds or low light. That disappointment was redressed when this bird was photographed, making considerable noise.



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Coracias garrulus in Tsavo West National Park



I'm not in a position to conjecture with any authority, but I sus pect that had we visited Tsavo West in another season, we might not have had so many Coracias garrulus sightings.


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Tom Kellie

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Maerua sp.



During other safaris, notably in Masai Mara, I'd seen Maerua sp. as shown in this image. Each time I lacked the confidence to ask for a photo stop. This time I asked, the result being this image of its delicate flowers.



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Tsavo West Baobab in Situ



For me, this image IS Tsavo West. Of course, not in any literal sense, as there's a rich variety of habitats and geological formations in Tsavo West which are nothing at all like this. Rather, it's the Tsavo West of my memory. Candidly speaking, I recoil from know-it-alls, whether in daily life or on safari. Their sad efforts to establish their preeminence through smugly having already seen and done everything in life stirs up sympathy for their family members and professional colleagues. What has more impact for me are those who feel deeply, with passion. Seeing this baobab in this setting kindles my own feelings for the beauty and tranquility of Tsavo West National Park.



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Tsavo West National Park Vegetation



What a biome! One look at such trees, bushes and undergrowth and one instantly knows that this is a habitat brimming with life. Kenya is blessed to have such an outstanding park as part of its natural heritage.



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Blooming Vernonia oligocephala



Another image of Vernonia oligocephala has been posted in ‘Show us your flora photos’. The purple color of its blooms made a bright border for an otherwise dusty track.



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Heliotropium steudneri



Here and there Heliotropium steudneri, Common Heliotrope, was flowering. It's blooms are arrayed in a spray which has a gentle curvature. On a small scale, one of the loveliest wildflowers.



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Delonix elata Blooms



As it was during game drives in Tsavo West National Park where I learned to recognize and appreciate Delonix elata, White Poinciana, it's only fitting that they were among the final flowers I saw in Tsavo West, immediately preceding something wholly unexpected.





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Tom Kellie

Lycaon pictus Arrives on the Scene



Without any warning the safari van stopped. Anthony, almost


whispering, said: “Up ahead, a wild dog”. We immediately


went into high gear. There had never been any mention of


Lycaon pictus, Wild Dog, a species I'd never seen. The


excitement in the van among the three of us was palpable.


There was a scout followed by several others. We snapped


our shutters, supposing that these might be the only shots


we would get of wild dogs. Ha! Much more were to follow.




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Scout



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Lycaon pictus Back on Track



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Wildflowers and Lycaon pictus



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Scouting Party



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Lycaon pictus Trio



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Reinforcing Bonds



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Loping Gait



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Lycaon pictus Surveying a Track

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Tom Kellie

Within two minutes it became apparent that a large gathering of


Lycaon pictus was taking place, with our safari van in the center.


Playing, resting, watching, they were a lively group to watch.


These portraits of individual wild dogs reflect their diversity, as


we saw them on that January morning in Tsavo West.




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Lycaon pictus



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African Wild Dog



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Well-equipped for Listening



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Lycaon pictus in Tsavo West National Park



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Cometh the Hunter



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Locking Eyes with Lycaon pictus



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Four Ears Alert



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Resting Amidst Wildflowers



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What's On Your Mind?



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Resting Lycaon pictus



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Lycaon pictus on Red Soil



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Harlequin Pied Bristle Coat

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Tom Kellie

From both sides of the red laterite earth track the wild dogs


entered. They yipped, growled and barked, but not really


very noisy — nothing more than friendly communication.


We were never able to accurately count their number


but it seemed to be less than two dozen, perhaps


twenty or so. We watched them, enthralled.




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Enter Stage Left



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Arrayed Along the Track



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Seven African Wild Dogs



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Lycaon pictus on a Red Soil Track in Tsavo West National Park



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Wide View of the Track with Lycaon pictus



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Farewell to Lycaon pictus

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Tom Kellie

Pulling away from the wild dogs, we headed out towards


the Mtito Andei Gate with an intensified appreciation of


the wildlife viewing available in Tsavo West National Park.


The behavior of Lycaon pictus, Wild Dog, at play was


comprised of dominance rituals, roughhousing, snapping,


chasing and periodic leaps. Below are images of the


Tsavo West wild dogs engaged in their morning exercises.




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Each Coat Pattern Unique



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Formidable Predators



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Dominance Rituals



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Playing in the Track



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Galloping African Wild Dogs



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Teeth Bared



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Rough Play



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A Notably Social Species



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Dominance Hierarchy in Action



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Lycaon pictus Interaction



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Pity the Gazelle Caught by These

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Peter Connan

@@Tom Kellie, what a magnificent sighting! I would trade the whole of the big five (except leopard) for a good dog sighting like this! Those three scouts are very dark aren't they?

 

With regard to your earlier comment/question, I think you will find your 400mm lens just as usefull in Leopard Hills as anywhere else, especially if you want to take close detail images as you mentioned in the lion photos thread? And while the gap is quite large, I have no doubt your customary and magnificent 135 on the spare body would leave you suitably armed for almost all eventualities?

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Tom Kellie

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Bradornis microrhynchus in Foliage



~ After the pizzazz and hoopla of observing Lycaon pictus at rest and play, it was pleasant to return to photographing Tsavo West's abundant birdlife. Having seen Bradornis microrhynchus, African Grey Flycatcher, at Rhino Valley Lodge earlier in the morning, I recognized it when we saw several perched along the track. The vine with curled foliage in this image is especially attractive.



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Merops superciliosus



I'm one of those ‘any bee-eater is a fine bee-eater’ types. Hence when we spotted Merops superciliosus, Madagascar Bee-eater, perched in colorful foliage, I requested a photo stop.



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Merops superciliosus on an Acacia Branch



The chestnut plumage under its bill I especially like. That may be due to my predilection for muted greys, earth tones and warm steely or cobalt blues. For some reason I associate such hues with cool jazz, which was the sound around me in early childhood, as well as Western classical music. Bee-eaters are the jazz of my safaris, with their swopping mid-air catches and insouciant returns to their customary perches.



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Terpsiphone viridis White Morph



How many times have I caught myself saying to Anthony yet again: “You never know”, after another special moment has passed? Our drive had taken us through a fairly barren stretch of forest when I saw a flash of brilliant white in a thicket. It was Terpsiphone viridis in the white morph. I'd seen the standard rufous morph, but had no expectation of ever seeing, let alone photographing, the white morph. Very, very nice.



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douglaswise

@@Tom Kellie:

 

While enjoyably browsing your trip report, it occurred to me that it would be very interesting to learn your opinions relating to the ivory trade. Clearly, unlike the vast majority of us, you could, perhaps, give insights into the Chinese take on conservation issues. Were, for example, the Chinese Government to determine that only legally acquired ivory be traded or, alternatively, that no ivory be traded, would its citizenry obey? It seems to me that, possibly unlike the rhino horn trade, the ivory trade could, in theory, be managed (or eliminated) by changes of attitudes among strong Asian governments.

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Tom Kellie

@@Tom Kellie, what a magnificent sighting! I would trade the whole of the big five (except leopard) for a good dog sighting like this! Those three scouts are very dark aren't they?

 

With regard to your earlier comment/question, I think you will find your 400mm lens just as usefull in Leopard Hills as anywhere else, especially if you want to take close detail images as you mentioned in the lion photos thread? And while the gap is quite large, I have no doubt your customary and magnificent 135 on the spare body would leave you suitably armed for almost all eventualities?

 

~ @@Peter Connan:

 

That's really kind of you to say that.

The warm encouragement which you and other Safaritalk members have given is the elixir fueling my confidence.

Yes, the three scouts seemed to stay together, even after the others arrived. Litter-mates? There was much licking and rubbing between them and others, possibly communicating information about what they'd observed.

What you've written above about the two lens I customarily use on safari is reassuring. While I haven't reached that point yet, I'll admit that I'm actively mulling over the possibility of a little getaway trip to Sabi Sands, most likely Leopard Hills. They're of special interest to me as I've read several reviews singling out the extra lengths the Leopard Hills kitchen staff and rangers make to accommodate the needs of those with infirmities of any sort, such as my lack of left eye vision, lame hand and lack of teeth.

Your steady support and encouragement mean much to me, given your highly skilled avian photography.

Shortly after spending time with the wild dogs, I spotted and photographed a white morph Terpsiphone viridis, African Paradise-flycatcher. Albeit seen at a distance through a thicket, that brief sighting was every bit as precious to me as the boisterous wild dogs.

With Appreciation,

Tom K.

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Tom Kellie

@@Tom Kellie:

 

While enjoyably browsing your trip report, it occurred to me that it would be very interesting to learn your opinions relating to the ivory trade. Clearly, unlike the vast majority of us, you could, perhaps, give insights into the Chinese take on conservation issues. Were, for example, the Chinese Government to determine that only legally acquired ivory be traded or, alternatively, that no ivory be traded, would its citizenry obey? It seems to me that, possibly unlike the rhino horn trade, the ivory trade could, in theory, be managed (or eliminated) by changes of attitudes among strong Asian governments.

 

~ Hello, @@douglaswise!

 

I trust and hope that you and most others will read between the lines of what I'll next write.

Here in Beijing, where I work and live at the sufferance of the Chinese government, every word that I send out through my computer is closely monitored by others, to ensure that ‘social harmony’ is maintained.

In practical terms that means that I'm considerably constrained in my communications with family and friends.

The same is not the case when I'm visiting Kenya.

Life in Beijing is really something. More than that I'd best not say.

Please pardon my tepid response, but understand that circumstances dictate a circumscribed online reply.

You may be very sure that I abhor poaching, and all who profit by it at any stage of the process from the initial killing to the final sale of a product.

With Apologies for the Necessarily Opaque Reply,

Tom K. (who would much prefer to be fully transparent, if living under more free and open circumstances)

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Kitsafari

@@Tom Kellie, you captured the buffaloes beautifully but what an awesome sighting of the painted dogs! What a fabulous surprise. did you have the viewing all to yourself?

 

the madagascar bee-eater is lovely, even if it's not as colourful as the southern carmine bee-eater.

 

 

 

 

@@Tom Kellie:

 

While enjoyably browsing your trip report, it occurred to me that it would be very interesting to learn your opinions relating to the ivory trade. Clearly, unlike the vast majority of us, you could, perhaps, give insights into the Chinese take on conservation issues. Were, for example, the Chinese Government to determine that only legally acquired ivory be traded or, alternatively, that no ivory be traded, would its citizenry obey? It seems to me that, possibly unlike the rhino horn trade, the ivory trade could, in theory, be managed (or eliminated) by changes of attitudes among strong Asian governments.

 

~ Hello, @@douglaswise!

 

I trust and hope that you and most others will read between the lines of what I'll next write.

Here in Beijing, where I work and live at the sufferance of the Chinese government, every word that I send out through my computer is closely monitored by others, to ensure that ‘social harmony’ is maintained.

In practical terms that means that I'm considerably constrained in my communications with family and friends.

The same is not the case when I'm visiting Kenya.

Life in Beijing is really something. More than that I'd best not say.

Please pardon my tepid response, but understand that circumstances dictate a circumscribed online reply.

You may be very sure that I abhor poaching, and all who profit by it at any stage of the process from the initial killing to the final sale of a product.

With Apologies for the Necessarily Opaque Reply,

Tom K. (who would much prefer to be fully transparent, if living under more free and open circumstances)

 

 

Being in Asia and well aware of what is happening in China, I can well understand and, definitely accept, your reticence in answering @@douglaswise's questions.

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Tom Kellie

@@Tom Kellie, you captured the buffaloes beautifully but what an awesome sighting of the painted dogs! What a fabulous surprise. did you have the viewing all to yourself?

 

the madagascar bee-eater is lovely, even if it's not as colourful as the southern carmine bee-eater.

 

 

 

 

@@Tom Kellie:

 

While enjoyably browsing your trip report, it occurred to me that it would be very interesting to learn your opinions relating to the ivory trade. Clearly, unlike the vast majority of us, you could, perhaps, give insights into the Chinese take on conservation issues. Were, for example, the Chinese Government to determine that only legally acquired ivory be traded or, alternatively, that no ivory be traded, would its citizenry obey? It seems to me that, possibly unlike the rhino horn trade, the ivory trade could, in theory, be managed (or eliminated) by changes of attitudes among strong Asian governments.

 

~ Hello, @@douglaswise!

 

I trust and hope that you and most others will read between the lines of what I'll next write.

Here in Beijing, where I work and live at the sufferance of the Chinese government, every word that I send out through my computer is closely monitored by others, to ensure that ‘social harmony’ is maintained.

In practical terms that means that I'm considerably constrained in my communications with family and friends.

The same is not the case when I'm visiting Kenya.

Life in Beijing is really something. More than that I'd best not say.

Please pardon my tepid response, but understand that circumstances dictate a circumscribed online reply.

You may be very sure that I abhor poaching, and all who profit by it at any stage of the process from the initial killing to the final sale of a product.

With Apologies for the Necessarily Opaque Reply,

Tom K. (who would much prefer to be fully transparent, if living under more free and open circumstances)

 

 

Being in Asia and well aware of what is happening in China, I can well understand and, definitely accept, your reticence in answering @@douglaswise's questions.

 

~ @Kitsafari:

 

Thank you very much for your most kind understanding.

It's against my nature to give such an evasive response, as I did to @@douglaswise's reasonable question.

However, as you know from being a fellow Asian resident, prudence necessitates no direct response at times with regard to what are regarded here as being ‘sensitive’ issues. Those of us living and working here are guests, and as guests, are not in a position to comment on our hosts.

I greatly respect those many Safaritalk members who are actively concerned with very serious conservation issues. @@COSMIC RHINO, @@Sangeeta and @@Safaridude come to mind.

As my circumstances may considerably differ from theirs, perhaps the best service I might render is to develop an appreciation of global conservation issues in my highly gifted life science students, many of whom are likely to someday occupy influential positions.

Knowing this, it may thus be clearer why I've fallen in love with the free, open, unrestricted national parks and national reserves of Kenya. They're nothing at all like Beijing.

Through a similar analogy, the reality that I've been unable to see in my left eye since birth, may be why I love nature photography and fine lenses. They enable me to see and enjoy the world's glories in ways which were previously unavailable to me.

One makes the best of one's circumstances as one finds them, as Elizabeth II said when asked to describe her lot in life, who ascended her lonely throne in none other than a Kenya game viewing lodge.

With Appreciation,

Tom K.

Edited by Tom Kellie
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