Jump to content

Recommended Posts

inyathi

Roan Antelope

 

Zakouma is a great place to see roan antelope. In the past 6 separate subspecies have been identified, including a Central African race (Hippotragus equinus charicushowever, many scientists question whether any of these subspecies really exist, thinking that all roan antelope are essentially the same. Often, subspecies have been described almost purely on the basis of coat colour, when in fact this can be very variable in all roan populations. In East or Southern Africa seeing roan can be something of a challenge, in Tanzania you can see them in Katavi and Ruaha, but sightings are certainly not guaranteed, otherwise if you’re lucky you can see them in Hwange in Zimbabwe and in Botswana. As well as a few other places, but for almost guaranteed sightings probably the best places are Nyika NP in Malawi and the Busanga Plains in Kafue NP in Zambia. Then there is Zakouma, judging by last year’s trip and this trip seeing roan (certainly in April) is guaranteed, this time I saw them every single day except for our last morning, mostly just one or two, often bulls but at Am Kalam down in the south, we saw a herd of 19, albeit not that well through the heat haze, as they were quite a long way away and we weren’t able to get close enough to really photograph them. Even if you don’t see them, in such big numbers as some of the other antelopes, they are such magnificent animals, that seeing them so easily, is one of the many great things about being on safari in Zakouma.

 

17023465733_7afa1edff1_o.jpg 

With Bohor reedbuck at Rigueik

 

17641399962_f0d04e8251_o.jpg 

 

 

17662532956_956cb0df02_o.jpg 

 

Seeing them everyday often times we saw the same animals this is the same bull photographed a week later

 

17455966148_aac8626a1f_o.jpg 

Yellow-billed storks, kob and roan at Tim

 

17617485966_489c84d992_o.jpg 

 

 

17617481896_a89691613f_o.jpg 

 

 

17641378042_4958c000c3_o.jpg 

At Sourane

 

17643794705_5cdb298424_o.jpg 

Near Biherat in the Maniam area in the south of Zakouma

 

17501017638_9e1b8a91cf_o.jpg 

Beside the Bahr Dikere

 

17686368092_4734d005c9_o.jpg 

 

Coming to drink from the Bahr Dikere

 

17689150995_2f238edeab_o.jpg 

 

17066338594_d4f9b04a20_o.jpg 

 

17502567199_b39f11f25f_o.jpg 

Edited by inyathi
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 309
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • inyathi

    162

  • jeremie

    18

  • Marks

    14

  • graceland

    12

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Camp Nomade   The beautifully designed camp is decorated in a style that evokes a Chadian/North African nomad camp.         The spacious main or mess tent has a comf

Zakouma 2015 Returning to Wildest Africa in Style       A quick note before starting, when writing reports I always like to go the extra mile for the more remote off the

Elephants   At the time that the park was established when Kordofan giraffes were in serious trouble elephants were still common in Zakouma and the wider region. However in the last decade t

Posted Images

Atravelynn

200 to 10,000 buffaloes - what a success! You saw a huge percentage of them. The video recorder is perfect for this location, offering a perspective not possible in a still.

Wishing equal success with boosting the ele herds to 1000, while maintaining the health of the environment.

 

Speaking of health, no tummy issues this time, it appears, and I hope.

 

I was experiencing deja vu when looking at your walking with ele herds, but that garden hose thing is a new one!

 

This trip report is just full of amazing surprises!

Link to post
Share on other sites
twaffle

Those roan antelope are magnificent. It has been many, many long years since I've seen a roan.

 

I don't know what time of day you photographed them in those last few images but there is a nice soft, hazy feel to the sky which is quite attractive.

Link to post
Share on other sites
jeremie

I can't wait to read and see about cats!!!

Link to post
Share on other sites
inyathi

@@Atravelynn

 

The food was excellent throughout.

 

I did have a few internal issues this time but this was definitely entirely a result of dehydration, being an experienced safari goer and after my experience last year I really should have known better. The problem is just remembering when you first arrive that as soon as you step off the plane you really need to start drinking and keep drinking, it just took me slightly too long to reach the point where I was drinking enough water. When all you're doing most of the time is sitting in a car it is easy to forget how much you need to drink and the fatal mistake if you know you haven't really drunk enough is to think that you can just drink more back in camp to make up for it, but that never works. I think when I got it right I must have been drinking 4-5 litres a day at least including what I was drinking while in camp.

Edited by inyathi
Link to post
Share on other sites
inyathi

Greater Kudu

 

One day while at Rigueik we decided to drive along the Bahr Dikere and braving the heat keep going returning the long way round to get back to Rigueik passing through an area of very dry bush/woodland, we were very surprised when we suddenly came across four kudus. Three cows and a young bull they quickly dashed into the bush, we only caught brief glimpses of them through the gaps between the trees as they made their escape. If we had been in Ruaha or any of the parks in Southern Africa where kudu are extremely common we would have paid no attention to them at all, but in Zakouma seeing these four animals was hugely exciting. I wasn’t able to get a clear view of them to take decent photos, so I took one poor shot just for the record.

 

 

17456196940_d167e13596_o.jpg 

 

Chad is home to the most westerly population of greater kudu (Tragelaphus strepsiceros) north of the Equator in Africa, (in the south they do occur further west in Namibia), in the past a whole bunch of different greater kudu subspecies have been described, but these have now been reduced to just three and even these three are disputed. Like roan kudu are very variable, so Chad’s greater kudu could be a distinct Central African race (Tragelaphus strepsiceros cottoni) or they could just be the same as any other greater kudus in Eastern or Southern Africa. Either way kudus are not common in Zakouma and were generally thought to be confined largely to the west of the park. When we recounted our sighting to Darren, he said that he had never seen any kudus at all in this area and they were not known to be in this part of Zakouma, we could only speculate that the population is increasing and that they are starting to move into new areas of the park, where previously they were absent at least in recent times.

 

In the course of writing this I came across this thread from a few years back

 

What camps in what countries for Kudu, (greater and lesser)...

 

It certainly was, I had hoped that we might possibly see some kudu somewhere in the park as this was the one antelope completely missing from our list last year, but I really hadn’t imagined that we would actually see any at all.

 

While our first brief glimpses of four kudus had been exciting it certainly hadn’t been a great view so we were both surprised and delighted when down in the south of the park near a place called Biherat we had excellent views of another four kudus.

 

17455922358_b5ef175f21_o.jpg 

 

 

img 

 

 

17457460549_43f671ec9b_o.jpg 

 

 

17455935118_f4dae90c69_o.jpg 

 

We spent some ten minutes watching and photographing these beautiful animals, before moving on, later while at Biherat watching water birds feeding at one of the pools, we saw the same four kudus appear a long way off down the channel, coming in to drink. As kudus are such a rare sight in Zakouma, seeing them twice was remarkable, as more tourists start to visit Zakouma, it will be interesting know how often they are seen in future and whether they start to become a common sight or whether we were just exceptionally lucky.

Edited by inyathi
Link to post
Share on other sites
Safaridude

@@inyathi

 

Roan found in Central and West Africa are spectacular. I love the way the bulls attain fully jet-black masks.

 

It is remarkable that naturally wary animals such as roan and tiang allow vehicles to come fairly close at Zakouma.

Edited by Safaridude
Link to post
Share on other sites
inyathi

Common Duiker

 

Sometimes known as the grey duiker, the common duiker (Slyvicapra grimmia). must be perhaps the most widely distributed antelope species in Africa, it occurs everywhere south of the Sahara, except in rainforest and the most arid of deserts. We didn’t really see very many of them, much the best view we had was on a night drive by the Salamat.

 

17643771255_42c95f8b5b_o.jpg 

 

As far as antelopes are concerned, the only species we missed out on this year, is the red-flanked duiker (Cephalophus rufilatus@Michael Lorentz and one of my companions glimpsed one last year, this is a primarily West and Central African species, that extends as far east as northwest Uganda west of the Nile, except for one small isolated population in Murchison Falls NP. They have a preference for riverine thickets, so probably we just didn’t go anywhere along the Salamat, where the vegetation was quite thick enough, if we had we would have had to brave a lot of hungry tsetse flies and needed a lot of luck to find one.

Edited by inyathi
Link to post
Share on other sites
Safaridude

@@inyathi

 

Red-flanked duikers are fairly common in Pendjari, Benin. I have no photos of them though, as they just jet across the bush every time. The red flank jetting across the vehicle became a standing joke. An attractive animal though.

Link to post
Share on other sites
wenchy

 

@@inyathi,

 

Any thoughts on what you'd add to the itinerary to complement the Zakouma portion? Wildlife oriented of course...no beaches, cities, etc.

 

Apart from the cost this is the big issue with Zakouma as a safari destination, combining Zakouma with Ennedi does seem to be the best option. One of the companies now offering Zakouma trips Steppes Travel offers this possibility they also suggest combining with CAR and Cameroon. Which is a little odd as they don’t actually offer trips to Cameroon in any case you’d want to stay away from the north of Cameroon at the moment because of Boko Haram. Also any of the national parks in the north of Cameroon would be a big disappointment after Zakouma, combining the park with somewhere in the rainforest has much more appeal but I think CAR would be a better bet (and maybe Congo Rep as well). Just for the contrast combining Zakouma with Dzangha Sangha in CAR would make for a fantastic trip the difficulty is trying to find a way to get from one to the other. It is possible to fly direct from N’Djamena to Douala in southern Cameroon (on the coast) it is only about 1hr 45 mins, from there I presume you can get a charter flight to Bayanga in Dzangha Sangha this certainly used to be possible. Whether it still is possible to charter a plane from Douala and how much it would cost I don’t know and whether the flight from N’Djamena to Douala would even work with Camp Nomade’s dates I’m not sure either.

 

 

Only parks in the extreme-nord ( waza for sure ) & nord ( even then safety issues re : BH currently do not extend into faro or benoue ) . Places like Lobeki are accessible by charter ( 3 airstrip options beside the logging concessions ) or can be chartered through a missionary org - both cheaper out of yaounde versus douala. Djembe & Kombo are very basic camps within lobeke. Dja, Korup are open but poaching is rampant so wildlife not too accessible. Sangha lodge / DZ in CAR is unquestionably the best option in the area for wildlife viewing ( mammals and birding ). It would be a cheaper charter continuing onwards to yaounde then picking up the charter nsi - bayanga as the charter co ( if using sil or other is based in nsi ). for a general reference return charter for 3 on the flight was 2k euro / person. apologies for going offtopic. wonderful trip report as always @@inyathi

Edited by wenchy
Link to post
Share on other sites
Atravelynn

Dehydration--I know, I know.

 

Drink, drink, drink.

 

I think some people are more prone to nausea issues whether from insufficient water intake or from motion. Do I recall you had some motion sickness on an elephant on a previous trip?

 

I hope whatever those issues were that they were minimal.

Link to post
Share on other sites
inyathi

@Safaridude I was aware mainly I think because of all the hunting that goes on around there that Pendjari must be a good place for red-flanked duikers and it is clearly a much better place to see them than Zakouma. Though I'm sure one of the attractions of working in Zakouma for some of the professional guides who will be guiding at Camp Nomade is the chance for them to see new species and subspecies that they have never seen before; so I can imagine that some of the guides might actually be quite keen to see red-flanked duikers. In which case perhaps some of the guides might work out how and where to find them.

 

As I mentioned earlier the buffalos at least when they were in the open were not very approachable starting to run as soon as you got near but the hartebeest, tiang and waterbuck really weren’t that bothered by us at all. The roan however weren’t actually quite so confiding that first bull that we saw on several occasions, when we stopped he would pose just long enough for us to get a couple of shots before moving off into the bush. So I would say we could get quite close to some of the roan but once we’d stopped they might not run but they would nearly always move off.

 

Had we searched some of the woodland areas around Rigueik a bit more in the early morning we might possibly have found some bigger herds of roan, but we weren’t disappointed with the ones we did see, at some point I will have to compare my Zakouma roans with any shots I’ve got from elsewhere to see just how different they do look.

 

@@Atravelynn This time I didn’t have any trouble with motion sickness unlike last year I made sure I took some tablets before we went up on our flight you have to take them 2hrs ahead but that was easy as it was an afternoon flight. Elephants are not necessarily the best vehicles if you suffer from motion sickness I have felt mildly unwell on an elephant but tempting though it might have been I didn't ride any of Zakouma's elephants so that wasn't an issue. :D On the subject of dehydration it is also worth remembering that air travel is quite dehydrating so it's probably a good idea to drink a bit more than usual after you get of your international flight, I think for me though a big part of the problem when I first arrive is just having to switch from not drinking very much at home to drink, drink, drink. I may not have completely learned my lesson from last year but I did make sure I had plenty of oral rehydration sachets I must have had over 50 this time as on last year's trip I was worried I might run out.

 

@@wenchy Thanks for that additional info.

Edited by inyathi
Link to post
Share on other sites
graceland

 

 

@@inyathi,

 

Any thoughts on what you'd add to the itinerary to complement the Zakouma portion? Wildlife oriented of course...no beaches, cities, etc.

 

Apart from the cost this is the big issue with Zakouma as a safari destination, combining Zakouma with Ennedi does seem to be the best option. One of the companies now offering Zakouma trips Steppes Travel offers this possibility they also suggest combining with CAR and Cameroon. Which is a little odd as they don’t actually offer trips to Cameroon in any case you’d want to stay away from the north of Cameroon at the moment because of Boko Haram. Also any of the national parks in the north of Cameroon would be a big disappointment after Zakouma, combining the park with somewhere in the rainforest has much more appeal but I think CAR would be a better bet (and maybe Congo Rep as well). Just for the contrast combining Zakouma with Dzangha Sangha in CAR would make for a fantastic trip the difficulty is trying to find a way to get from one to the other. It is possible to fly direct from N’Djamena to Douala in southern Cameroon (on the coast) it is only about 1hr 45 mins, from there I presume you can get a charter flight to Bayanga in Dzangha Sangha this certainly used to be possible. Whether it still is possible to charter a plane from Douala and how much it would cost I don’t know and whether the flight from N’Djamena to Douala would even work with Camp Nomade’s dates I’m not sure either.

 

 

Only parks in the extreme-nord ( waza for sure ) & nord ( even then safety issues re : BH currently do not extend into faro or benoue ) . Places like Lobeki are accessible by charter ( 3 airstrip options beside the logging concessions ) or can be chartered through a missionary org - both cheaper out of yaounde versus douala. Djembe & Kombo are very basic camps within lobeke. Dja, Korup are open but poaching is rampant so wildlife not too accessible. Sangha lodge / DZ in CAR is unquestionably the best option in the area for wildlife viewing ( mammals and birding ). It would be a cheaper charter continuing onwards to yaounde then picking up the charter nsi - bayanga as the charter co ( if using sil or other is based in nsi ). for a general reference return charter for 3 on the flight was 2k euro / person. apologies for going offtopic. wonderful trip report as always @@inyathi

 

I have to be honest; I have no idea what you just told me....but you gave me quite a bit to GOOGLE. Thank you for all the info....OVERWHELMING. I think I'd not try to attempt considering all the problems and or costs of charters and just try heading somewhere else. I'd like to think I am adventurous but not as above! I have time to think it through, will not be one of my "last minute" jaunts...thanks again!

Link to post
Share on other sites
graceland

@Safaridude I was aware mainly I think because of all the hunting that goes on around there that Pendjari must be a good place for red-flanked duikers and it is clearly a much better place to see them than Zakouma. Though I'm sure one of the attractions of working in Zakouma for some of the professional guides who will be guiding at Camp Nomade is the chance for them to see new species and subspecies that they have never seen before; so I can imagine that some of the guides might actually be quite keen to see red-flanked duikers. In which case perhaps some of the guides might work out how and where to find them.

 

As I mentioned earlier the buffalos at least when they were in the open were not very approachable starting to run as soon as you got near but the hartebeest, tiang and waterbuck really weren’t that bothered by us at all. The roan however weren’t actually quite so confiding that first bull that we saw on several occasions, when we stopped he would pose just long enough for us to get a couple of shots before moving off into the bush. So I would say we could get quite close to some of the roan but once we’d stopped they might not run but they would nearly always move off.

 

Had we searched some of the woodland areas around Rigueik a bit more in the early morning we might possibly have found some bigger herds of roan, but we weren’t disappointed with the ones we did see, at some point I will have to compare my Zakouma roans with any shots I’ve got from elsewhere to see just how different they do look.

 

@@Atravelynn This time I didn’t have any trouble with motion sickness unlike last year I made sure I took some tablets before we went up on our flight you have to take them 2hrs ahead but that was easy as it was an afternoon flight. Elephants are not necessarily the best vehicles if you suffer from motion sickness I have felt mildly unwell on an elephant but tempting though it might have been I didn't ride any of Zakouma's elephants so that wasn't an issue. :D On the subject of dehydration it is also worth remembering that air travel is quite dehydrating so it's probably a good idea to drink a bit more than usual after you get of your international flight, I think for me though a big part of the problem when I first arrive is just having to switch from not drinking very much at home to drink, drink, drink. I may not have completely learned my lesson from last year but I did make sure I had plenty of oral rehydration sachets I must have had over 50 this time as on last year's trip I was worried I might run out.

 

@@wenchy Thanks for that additional info.

Dehydration occurs no matter. Both of us were very ill in Peru with it. And I live with water in my bag, hand, backpack...never leave home without it. You just never know how your body responds. Having the rehydration packets help quite a bit! Loving the report, thank you again!

Link to post
Share on other sites
Marks

Fantastic posts over the last few days! The buffalo herds are impressive to say the least.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Atravelynn

 

@@Atravelynn This time I didn’t have any trouble with motion sickness unlike last year I made sure I took some tablets before we went up on our flight you have to take them 2hrs ahead but that was easy as it was an afternoon flight. Elephants are not necessarily the best vehicles if you suffer from motion sickness I have felt mildly unwell on an elephant but tempting though it might have been I didn't ride any of Zakouma's elephants so that wasn't an issue. :D On the subject of dehydration it is also worth remembering that air travel is quite dehydrating so it's probably a good idea to drink a bit more than usual after you get of your international flight, I think for me though a big part of the problem when I first arrive is just having to switch from not drinking very much at home to drink, drink, drink. I may not have completely learned my lesson from last year but I did make sure I had plenty of oral rehydration sachets I must have had over 50 this time as on last year's trip I was worried I might run out.

 

Your lesson can be our lesson and my lesson! Great reminder!

Link to post
Share on other sites
Atravelynn

Those definitely are large, impressive horns on the waterbuck. In looking at your roan shots I could feel the intensity of the heat. Red-fronted gazelle, how nice they turned out for you this year.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Kitsafari

that's a magnificent looking roan, and hanging around the same place for you to see him twice in a week.

 

I love that picture of the elephant mum just resting horizontally on the riverbed, so secure in the knowledge that her baby won't come to any harm for those precious moments of rest.

 

The pictures of the buffaloes in post 53 are just awesome. I hope I get to see them with my own eyes one day.

 

thank you for sharing all those immigration details - very useful to know indeed!

Link to post
Share on other sites
Safaridude

@Safaridude I was aware mainly I think because of all the hunting that goes on around there that Pendjari must be a good place for red-flanked duikers and it is clearly a much better place to see them than Zakouma. Though I'm sure one of the attractions of working in Zakouma for some of the professional guides who will be guiding at Camp Nomade is the chance for them to see new species and subspecies that they have never seen before; so I can imagine that some of the guides might actually be quite keen to see red-flanked duikers. In which case perhaps some of the guides might work out how and where to find them.

 

As I mentioned earlier the buffalos at least when they were in the open were not very approachable starting to run as soon as you got near but the hartebeest, tiang and waterbuck really weren’t that bothered by us at all. The roan however weren’t actually quite so confiding that first bull that we saw on several occasions, when we stopped he would pose just long enough for us to get a couple of shots before moving off into the bush. So I would say we could get quite close to some of the roan but once we’d stopped they might not run but they would nearly always move off.

 

Had we searched some of the woodland areas around Rigueik a bit more in the early morning we might possibly have found some bigger herds of roan, but we weren’t disappointed with the ones we did see, at some point I will have to compare my Zakouma roans with any shots I’ve got from elsewhere to see just how different they do look.

 

 

@@inyathi

 

It is my opinion that roan found in Chad, CAR, Cameroon, Benin, etc., aside from attaining those total black face masks and black marks extending down to their chest, stand just a bit taller, more erect (sort of like the difference between a giant sable and common sable).

Link to post
Share on other sites
inyathi

Patas Monkey

 

When I was debating whether I should really join .... on our recce trip last year, one of the many thoughts that came to mind was that given Zakouma’s location, the park must have patas monkeys. I’d always wanted to see some of these monkeys in the wild, but I’d never been to the right place, so I wondered if Zakouma, could just prove to be that right place. The thought that I might see patas monkeys, was just one of many reasons, why I wanted to go to Zakouma and why I said yes to going on that trip. Of course, I didn’t actually know, whether I would see any or not, I just assumed that I was bound to at some point, well I did see some, I had two very brief and not particularly great views both on the same day and when I saw the first one, I didn’t have my 100-400 lens with me. So, I left Zakouma last year with no photos and somewhat disappointed, at not having had decent views.

 

This is what I wrote in last year’s report

 

Quote

I bet we see patas monkeys on our way to the airstrip, aside from red-fronted gazelles and pale foxes this was the one mammal I most wanted to see.

 

Sure enough, not that many minutes later, we spotted a male patas standing in the fork of a tree, after a quick look through my binoculars, I tried to take at least one shot with my little lens, but I just wasn’t quick enough. Unlike other monkeys which take to the trees, when they feel threatened, Patas prefer to make a run for it, their long-legged cheetah like build allows them to run at up to 34.2 miles an hour, making them the world’s fastest primate. This one quickly dropped to the ground, dashed off through the grass and disappeared from view, well I guess as with the fox the previous night, I may not have got a photograph, but at least I’d finally seen one.

 

Patas also known as hussar or military monkeys, because of their red coats are basically a Sahel species, ranging from Senegambia to Western Ethiopia and then south into northern Uganda and parts of Kenya, with several very small populations in northern Tanzania. They can be seen without too much difficulty in Murchison Falls NP in Uganda, but only on the north bank of the Nile, when I was last in MFNP, I was unable to cross over the Nile for security reasons, denying me the possibility of seeing patas there.

 

The monkey was gone so fast that even if I had brought my 100-400, I would have been lucky to get a shot, even so I still felt a bit of a fool for leaving it behind and ignoring the golden rule on safari, always bring your camera or in this case the right lens.

 

 

 

Quote

As we approached the Salamat we saw a troop of patas monkeys running through the trees but they were rather distant and weren’t going to stop to let us watch them, so I was unable to get any photos, besides it was far too hot to want to stop. We didn’t see anymore patas after this and speculated that they might not be doing that well in Zakouma, because of competition with the swarms of olive baboons. Patas do react to baboons in the same way that they react to other predators and the lighter more cryptically coloured females and young naturally try to keep a low profile, to avoid being spotted by predators, making them not easy to see at the best of times, so you’re quite unlikely to see them if there are baboons around.

 

However, except for certain parts of West Africa, where patas are very common, they are generally found at fairly low densities across much of their range, so it may be that they have always been quite scarce in Zakouma. In parks like Kidepo and Murchison Falls in Uganda for example, they are quite patchily distributed, this may be because of their preference for a mix of open grassland and lightly wooded savannah with water nearby, in the dry season they have to drink several times a day. As well as eating a lot of tree seeds that they pick off the ground, they also need trees to sleep in at night, but they don’t like densely wooded habitats, because of their need to run from predators. So, aside from the baboons, perhaps habitat explains why we saw very few patas and only on this one day, it may just be that much of Zakouma, is either too open or the opposite too densely wooded or too dry.

 

I knew having so much extra time in the park and being able to be at various different locations at the best times of day, we should have a much better chance of seeing them this year. However, given my thoughts last year, on why we saw so few patas monkeys then, I didn’t have particularly high hopes for this trip.

 

We saw our first troop soon after we arrived on the 1st April, when we were driving to Camp Nomade

 

17126566054_21762c0382_o.jpg 

 

 

17749406561_918767084a_o.jpg 

 

Followed by at least one patas, every day thereafter except the final morning and sometimes we saw huge troops of them and really very well, even if they wouldn’t allow us to get close. Quite often they were too far away to photograph, but I did get okay shots of them on 6 different days, (though I have cropped most of them) and by the end we’d seen so many of them, that clearly some of what I wrote last year, at least the speculation is actually nonsense. In this case I was very happy to be proved wrong

 

At Rigueik on the 2nd

 

17126557314_d9f28a0fc9_o.jpg 

 

On the 3rd

 

17561254468_53ee341152_o.jpg 

 

 

17561250478_ce9d42cd7d_o.jpg 

 

By the Salamat on the 5th

 

17749390811_3dcdffe521_o.jpg 

 

 

17562767529_b7a7f35bc3_o.jpg 

 

Edited by inyathi
Link to post
Share on other sites
inyathi

A big troop of perhaps 40+ by the Salamat on the 6th

 

17746400762_afd64010b9_o.jpg 

 

 

17722669356_995d9866f0_o.jpg

 

 

17749374301_5c8a18a57c_o.jpg 

 

The big troop male

 

17722663386_ae4d75aca6_o.jpg

 

 

Further south along the Salamat on the 7th

 

17126517724_9d3a927a90_o.jpg 

Patas monkeys with their athletic build run to get out of trouble

 

 

17128646843_238422d6f2_o.jpg 

Edited by inyathi
Link to post
Share on other sites
Big_Dog

Awesome. The density and variety of ungulates, and the mixed-species photography (mixed Class too, with crocs and birds in with the bucks and baboons) showcases what this unique park has. The Patas monkeys are also wonderful.
I've had an African Honey Bee burrowing about in my hair...is the sting (as I was told) much worse than a European one?

Link to post
Share on other sites
inyathi

Not entirely forgotten but perhaps a little bit of an oversight just because I didn't get any photos this time but I will have a complete list of all the mammals seen on the trip at the end of this part as there are a couple of others I don't have photos of.

Link to post
Share on other sites
twaffle

@@inyathi I particularly appreciate the patas monkey photos. I'm always a bit bemused by how little value people often put in observing and photographing monkeys as they are endlessly interesting. Beautiful creatures indeed.

Link to post
Share on other sites
TonyQ

I have really enjoyed the structure of this report with sections on different mammals. I always enjoy watching monkeys - the patas monkeys lok like beautiful animals.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Safaritalk uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. By using Safaritalk you agree to our use of cookies. If you wish to refuse the setting of cookies you can change settings on your browser to clear and block cookies. However, by doing so, Safaritalk may not work properly and you may not be able to access all areas. If you are happy to accept cookies and haven't adjusted browser settings to refuse cookies, Safaritalk will issue cookies when you log on to our site. Please also take a moment to read the Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy: Terms of Use l Privacy Policy