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amybatt

This is the first TR I've ever read on Namibia and I'm just blown away. From the incredible landscape to the desert-adapted species, wow! Anxious to read the rest!

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HOBATERE--3 nights I stayed 3 nights at the charming newly re-opened Hobatere Lodge in Western Etosha. Drives were done with Hobatere vehicles and guides. Albert was my skilled and enjoyable gui

WILD CAMPING IN PALMWAG CONCESSION—3 nights scheduled, 2 nights completed*   *The reason for 2, not 3 nights of wild camping was that the jack that accompanied the vehicle broke, and Ian did not wan

How kind of you xelas and you certainly know Namibia! No new gear--yet.   PALMWAG LODGE--2 nights On the way to Palmwag Lodge, we stopped at Grootberg Lodge for lunch so I could see the view.

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Atravelynn

@@Atravelynn such gorgeous scenery at Palmwag, and seeing that mother and baby rhino indeed would have felt totally worth that fee to me! What a stunning photo that is and I can almost feel transported to that spot looking at it!

Thanks! You ended up getting transported a little to the East--Zimbabwe!!

 

The mix of gorgeous landscapes and specilised wildlife makes Damaraland indeed a special place to visit.

Luckily I have not read your description about approach road to Grootberg before I have tackled it. It looks less frightening from the driver's seat then from the passenger seat, according to Zvezda's words.

I should have just hopped from my horizontal position in the back seat into the driver's seat then! Hope I don't scare any would-be visitors. That would be bad for Grootberg's business.

 

@@Atravelynn thanks for this in depth report of a wild Namibia safari. I have great memories of Hobatere (when Steve and Louise Braine were the concessionaires) and the Hide, where the oryx ran around aggressively keeping other animals from the water.

 

The Palmwag scenery is amongst the most disticntive that I have ever seen.

 

Sorry to hear about your safari sciatica - ouch! Hope it doesn't blight your Mana trip. Fortunately it did not, but I had the "pharmacy" with me and chemical cold and hot packs all packed. Like I needed hot packs when the temps hit 104 F!

 

@@pault I believe the Hobatere concession is now part of the Africat North Research Project Area and is managed by Tammy Hoth-Hanssen, http://www.africat.org/about/africat-north. I think this has subsumed the Afri-Leo Foundation which used to neighbour Hobatere. As far as I know, the fire in January 2011 destroyed the main lodge that included the dining and reception areas as well as the Manager's residence. The separate accommodation apparently escaped, but may have been re-modelled since. Steve and Louise Braine and their sons now run Batis Birding out of Swakop.

 

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Thanks for the background, fire and all! It's a special spot.

 

Palmwag is so beautiful that if you didn't have the photos you might think you had been hallucinating a bit. 10 out of 10 for those, photos, your determination, Manne's tracking, Ian's foresight, and oryx camouflage (took me a moment to spot the last one). Me too. What a great little adventure that was. Invaluable tips as usual. You and Treepol really know how to do Namibia.

 

One of these might have come in handy. Popular in places like Thailand where public toilets are rare and gridlock on the roads common (less needed nowadays). Would have worked a treat with the milk carton. I have seen those and recall a discussion about them on another forum. If I ever need one, I now have the link thanks to you Paul! Maybe I should market my chopped off milk carton at a fraction of the price, garbage bag included.

 

http://www.lazada.co.th/fiona-p-ez-female-urinal-f0018-6692889.html

 

Glad to hear you are fit again and have a great time in Mana Pools. I did !

 

 

@@Atravelynn

 

You were not hallucinating that road up to Grootberg is very steep. That Rhino trek would have very tough over that terrain with a bad back, (walking was ok fortunately) it was quite a struggle for some on our trek last year. (some of those folks maybe should have just sent their cameras, which is what I was told some people do.) @@xelas is right you have excellent shots so far and I look forward to more after what will be another great Mana Pools trip. have fun! Thanks after the fact!

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Atravelynn

Lynn - sorry to hear about the back problems but glad to know that you're all better now. Thanks for the well wishes!

 

Your descriptions and photos of the wild camping have me drooling :wub:

I was in Namibia late April/early May (so a little before you) and followed a similar route (though sadly no Hobatere). Wildlife was very good in the usual section of Etosha even as early as that. Did you do a report or at least a blurb? That normally wet and less productive time frame but least expensive time frame may be more appealing if there is lots to see, which seems to have been your experience.

But your rhino pictures are perfect. They convey the immensity of the landscape and the tiny rock-like dots that rhinos can be when they truly roam wild and free. Looking forward very much to reading the rest whenever you get back to it!

 

 

@@Atravelynn, what an exciting trip. Im planning a Namibia trip now, unfortunately is seems Etosha pretty well books out 12 months in advance Wow! That's a good tip. so it looks like it will have to be 2018. We will use a guide/ driver too, my husband is not interested in self-driving, fair enough , I want him to relax and enjoy it too. I have read through your previous report thoroughly too, so will keep Wild Dog Safaris in mind once I have a loose itinerary planned. Could you please just clarify a couple of things.

 

"Even though I paid double for the private trip, it was worth the $211 USD that appeared on my credit card statement. Maybe it is possible to book a private trip in advance.I also found out that it is possible to hire some of the SRT rangers to accompany private vehicles. Don’t know the specifics or the costs." Does this mean you were just lucky that you were the only participant or did you actually book it as a private trip? I was just lucky, but I would guess you could arrange a private trip in advance because I had numerous group trips arranged and paid for in advance through Wild Dog. I even had one regular group nature drive prepaid at Palmwag Lodge, which was not a rhino tracking trip. It went with just me for the price of a group trip because I prepaid. The reason I did not prepay rhino tracking was that I had about 3 days devoted to it after Palmwag Lodge. But when I found out how convenient it would be to add in another rhino tracking opportunity, I booked the night before at Palmwag Lodge. If others had booked too, the cost would have been half.

 

"Two Save the Rhino Trust Rangers joined us—Rean and Hoffing—and we left at 5:50 am." Is this usual or was that again just luck that they accompanied you, would you normally have to request and pay extra for this service? $211 is a very fair price for a private vehicle, driver/guide and 2 Rangers! That is the standard procedure for every rhino tracking trip. The part about hiring rangers to join us in our own vehicle is not as typical from what I understand. That's more of a negotiation and is based on what rangers may be available. It turned out we did not hire any rangers to join us in our vehicle.

 

The camping trip sounds just wonderful. Thanks for another great, informative report. You are welcome.

 

 

Wow, a real adventure trip Lynn! Gorgeous photos of scenery and wildlife, I agree, your favourite Rhino photo is mine as well. Very sorry to hear about your health problems I know from experience how incredibly frustrating it is when one tries to put on shoes for half an hour - and fails. So you have been there, no fun! I hope all your fantastic sightings helped you forget about the pain. Fortunately for the walking/trekking sightings there was only minimal pain, but the seated-in-the-vehicle sightings were tougher. Glad to hear you are well again. Looking forward to the continuation of this report very much! Thanks, it will soon be concluding.

 

 

you must be in Mana Pools now Lynn so hope your health holds up and I'm sure you're gonna have one heck of a trip with the others.

but you're a strong resilient woman (drugs help!!) - even sciatia ain't gonna stop you going places! It might stop me from going, but once I was there it was certainly not going to send me home prematurely!

 

Love the mountain zebras having a go at each other and the ostrich being the observer. and the mice were so adorable. incredible colours of the landscape and so enticing.

 

stunning rhinos. i'm just astounded each time that animals can survive in such harsh harsh land. Talk about strong and resilient!

 

 

~ @@Atravelynn

 

Thank you so much for educating me about desert-adapted species.

I hadn't known anything about them prior to reading your fine trip report. I'm sure the desert-adapted species out there somewhere!

Tom K.

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Atravelynn

How truly magnificent this safari appears to have been, from the rhinos to the little mice and then there's the landscapes. Just superb. The pain from herniated discs is just awful, I think you managed extremely well. I did. Better living through chemistry!

 

I hope Mana delivers big time for you. Your hopes helped. We had a wonderful trip.

 

 

I too am truly enjoying this trip report.

 

And I really appreciate the information you dispense so freely, since I will be in the area myself in April. Several posts back Sangeeta mentioned her good experience in April.

 

Thank you. My pleasure.

 

 

@@Atravelynn I see that you are back. Time to get busy finishing this report. I've been anxiously awaiting your return!

Yes ma'am. The conclusion is on the way.

 

This is the first TR I've ever read on Namibia and I'm just blown away. From the incredible landscape to the desert-adapted species, wow! Anxious to read the rest!

Thanks. There are quite a few Namibia reports here on safaritalk, covering various regions. The variety of scenery does indeed blow you away.

 

 

 

Verbal clash between a baby elephant and a warthog at the Dolomite Waterhole in Etosha. The baby elephant sent the warthog packing!

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Atravelynn

Hoanib Desert Elephants and Scenery

The afternoon of our second day of “wild camping” we reached the Hoanib River, much of it dry riverbed. We found about 6 elephants before setting up camp in the early evening. The next day we spent the morning along riverbed and found about 25 more elephants, in herds of 4-6, pairs of cow and calf , and single animals. Elephant viewing was both from the vehicle and on foot. The behavior of the elephants was similar to what I have experienced elsewhere. I thought they might be a lot more skittish, like the lions and rhino were.

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Hoanib River, elephants seen from the vehicle. The dappled light through the trees was shades of Mana Pools-literally.

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More eles viewed from the car at Hoanib River

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Elephants viewed on foot at Hoanib River – 3 pairs of mothers and calves

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Hoanib River and 3 hard to see oryx Hoanib River scenery – sand on mountains and no oryx

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Hoanib River and an easy to see oryx Driving along the Hoanib River’s dry riverbed

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Driving along the Hoanib River’s dry riverbed

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We walked up one of the mountainous banks overlooking the Hoanib River and riverbed, offering a beautiful view of elephants in this unique environment.

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Elephants shared the region with other creatures – the giraffe strolled through our Hoanib River camp on the second night. Steenbock is leftmost.

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Scenery (and ostriches) between Hoanib River and Sesfontein

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Natural detailed formations on rock walls at Hoanib River camp (wild camping)

Khowarib Rest Camp, for our 3rd Night Camping, instead of the Scheduled “Wild Camping”

A faulty jack that came with the vehicle and broke during our trip resulted in the final night being in a less remote location that could not be considered “wild camping.” Ian did not want to risk being in a secluded area with no jack, a wise and prudent move. Khowarib Camp was about 35 kms from Sesfontein.

 

I learned from my last trip how everyone seems to know everyone in Namibia. With just 2 million people in the whole country and the tourism industry being a close knit community, friends and acquaintances of Ian popped up everywhere. This time it was Manne’s turn. His daughter was working at Khowarib Rest Camp and greeted us when we arrived.

 

The setting sun and the rising moon provided a gorgeous backdrop for Khowarib.

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This is my tent with the adjacent loo-tent that included a western flush toilet and a hot shower upon request.

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Sun is going down at Khowarib Rest Camp

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Moon is coming up at Khowarib Rest Camp

Ian and I discussed the flow of the camping part of our trip and Ian suggested that 2 nights wild camping and the final night at Khowarib might be a good way to do things if this itinerary were to be offered in the future. So the faulty jack contributed to a positive outcome.

Next is the conclusion with Damaraland's Kipwe and Erongo & a visit to the Wild Dog office in Windhoek

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Atravelynn

I just read my nonsensical answer to you @@Tom Kellie.

 

Tom Kellie, on 05 Oct 2016 - 07:26 AM, said:snapback.png

~ @Atravelynn

 

Thank you so much for educating me about desert-adapted species.

I hadn't known anything about them prior to reading your fine trip report. I'm sure the desert-adapted species out there somewhere!

Tom K.

I meant to write I'm sure there is a poem on the desert-adapted species out there somewhere! You being the rhyming quartet poet and all.

:wacko:

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amybatt

That rising moon photo is breathtaking. The only thing that might make it better would be the animal of your choice silhouetted in it!

 

The landscape in this set reminds me a bit of Colorado, but maybe it's the lighting too. Beautiful!

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Atravelynn

That rising moon photo is breathtaking. The only thing that might make it better would be the animal of your choice silhouetted in it!

 

The landscape in this set reminds me a bit of Colorado, but maybe it's the lighting too. Beautiful! I ran into a couple of people from the US Southwest who felt like they were at home in Damaraland.

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Thank you for reminding me to post my silhouette shot! I almost forgot it. My fav cheetah in the moonlight. B)

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Atravelynn

Adapter & Weather

 

Type M adapter is used in Namibia. During the 3 wild camping days, I did not charge batteries. I brought 5 batteries with me for my Canon Powershot SX50, which more than carried me through the 3 days with no charging.

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Type M adapter that I used in Namibia and the wall outlet in Namibia, which shows this is the prong configuration that is accepted.

 

June is the driest month with 0 mm of rain on average so I was not concerned about rain. But for warmth I did bring rain pants and a raincoat/windbreaker. There were times when it was windy. My concern was the cold. July is the coldest month and I was coming home the 3rd week of June--so close to the coldest time. The lows had been known to reach about 10-12 C or 50-55 F. That can be cold outside at night, and I hate cold, so I packed a light winter coat, a wool hat, and mittens. Plus fleece pants. I did not need any of this heavy stuff.

 

http://en.climate-data.org/location/715224/

 

 

CAMP KIPWE in DAMARALAND – 1 night

Enroute to Camp Kipwe, and nearby, was the Damaraland Living Museum, where I spent about 45 minutes getting a close up look traditional life in the area.

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Damaraland Living Museum

Camp Kipwe was one of two destinations included for logistics because it is a long way from the Hoanib River area back to Windhoek, for my international flight. Plus, I wanted to see the ancient etchings of Twyfelfontein. Also if I had missed the desert eles, Camp Kipwe offered a really good second chance to see them. I ended up not taking advantage of the morning guided 4-5 hour excursion to seek desert elephant because of my fine viewing along the Hoanib.

 

Camp Kipwe perfectly put to use its captivating setting, offering exquisite accommodations and dining. Their lemon welcome drink was so tasty that I had two, then ordered another couple at dinner.

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Camp Kipwe’s dining area with a beautiful view

I had Room #3, which was lovely, but not as private as some of the others, due to its location across from the lounge and dining area. Ian had chosen Camp Kipwe for a relaxing, special getaway for two; and he is as knowledgeable as anyone about where to go in Namibia. I think he made an excellent choice. I found Camp Kipwe to be absolutely enchanting (and that is without going on their signature excursion of the desert ele safari).

 

Ascending a well marked rocky path to the “mountaintop” bar to toast the sunset was the evening routine.

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Sunset from Camp Kipwe

The sunrises weren’t bad either.

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Sunrise from Camp Kipwe

But what I was most thrilled with was a good sighting of the endemic Damaraland Hornbill, which had eluded me during the trip. How can you visit Damaraland for a week and not see the Damaraland Hornbill?

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Early morning, distant shots of the Damaraland Hornbill from Kipwe. A Yellow vented bulbul is conveniently present for contrast.

Kipwe offers afternoon guided trips to nearby area attractions such as:

Organ Pipe rock formations

Petrified Forest

Twyfelfontein area

 

Ian was able to take me to these himself on a morning excursion.

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Petrified forest and a Welwitschia – how utterly Namibian

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Twyfelfontein scenery Most famous Twyfelfontein etching

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Can you spot the elephant? Twyfelfontein

I thought these ancient (2000 years old or more) works of art were a star attraction. An 8:30-ish am arrival meant I avoided crowds and the heat. A little later in the day would reduce the shade on the etchings. My docent said the etchings were best photographed in the sun rather than the shade.

 

 

 

ERONGO WILDERNESS LODGE in DAMARALAND – 1 night

This camp was one of two included for logistics because it is a long way from the Hoanib River area back to Windhoek, for my international flight. Besides the convenient location, Erongo also provided unique excursions (such as climbing to ancient cave paintings) as well as sightings (an upright dik dik, dassies by the dozens, and loads of lovebirds).

 

After checking out of Camp Kipwe and doing our morning activities around the Twyfelfontein area (etchings, petrified forest, organ pipes), we had just enough time to make it to Erongo in for the afternoon game drive + walk to cave paintings + sundowners on the cliff that departed about 3:15 pm. I tend to think the average self driver could not make it from the Twyfelfontein area, after doing the typical activities in that area, to Erongo for the afternoon excursion in time because Ian knew a shortcut and was a confident driver even when roads were unpaved.

 

Erongo is both interesting and elegant, with built in exercise opportunities just getting to your tent/room.

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My lovely Room #2 was a hike. At night the rocky climb was well lit. Erongo Wilderness Lodge.

 

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The interior of the lovely Room #2, Erongo Wilderness Lodge Fancy bathroom, Erongo Wilderness Lodge

 

Meals were outstanding and served on the candlelit outdoor deck, which I was forced to pace between courses and sometimes between bites due to my throbbing rear end that worsened when seated.

 

Our first and only notable sighting on the winding, hilly drive was quite remarkable: a dik dik acting like a gerenuk! It even posed for the “bikini shot.”

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Dik dik browsing upright as a gerenuk would on Erongo Wilderness Lodge nature drive

The walk to the cave with the paintings was a bit steep and harrowing. I was told occasionally guests decided not to proceed up the steep, flat, sheer rock path. But I was also told a lady in her 80s made the walk without incident recently. The reward is worth the climb.

 

In contrast to the the etchings at Twyfelfontein, these works of art are painted. And they are thought to be even more ancient. Before descending the cliff with the paintings, we enjoyed sundowners. I would advise against alcohol due to the steep grade of the surface we were on.

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Erongo Wilderness Lodge cave paintings and sunset views

To encourage guests to explore the area around Erongo on foot, guided morning walks are complimentary. I had to take a pass because Louise of Wild Dog Safaris had managed to make me a doctor appointment, perfectly timed after I arrived in back in Windhoek but well before my flight. But it meant we had to leave Erongo before the walk would end.

I was very impressed with the responsiveness of the Wild Dog office to my request to please arrange for additional pain pills for the flight home. Through several back and forth phone calls they contacted a doctor, who only prescribed pain meds to patients after an in-person appointment.

 

So Louise of Wild Dog Safaris arranged a prompt and convenient appointment with this doctor with a pharmacy right next door. That was going above and beyond what is normally expected of a safari provider. (On trip #1 my health was fine, but the meerkats were uncooperative, so Ian and Louise once again went above and beyond to rearrange my itinerary mid-trip so that I might see meerkats.) That’s twice in two trips I had two very different special requests honored and successfully enacted!

 

Since I had to forego the morning walk, it gave me more time to leisurely explore the grounds my on final morning at Erongo. Such great stuff going on in the morning, particularly dassies and Rosey-faced Lovebirds! There was a bird feeder near the dining deck that attracted the flocks of Rosey-faced Lovebirds. They’d gather pre- and post-dining in the trees.

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Rosey-faced Lovebirds at Erongo Wilderness Lodge in the morning

I had seensome dassies as I had prepared to depart on my afternoon drive right after arriving at Erongo, but nothing compared to the numbers that were out on the boulders in the morning sun (around 7-8 am).

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A baby dassie is nursing, above.

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Dassies on the boulders around Erongo Wilderness Lodge in the morning sun.

What I don't know is if the lovebirds would be fluttering about and if the dassies would still be leisurely lounging in the sun when the scheduled walk returned.

A Montero’s Hornbill bid farewell as we departed Erongo.

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Montero’s Hornbill, a Namibian endemic, Erongo Wilderness Lodge

Back in Windhoek, I stopped by the Wild Dog Safaris office and met the busy and congenial staff members, including Liz the owner. The place was huge, especially with their gigantic garage.

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The sign for the Wild Dog office in Windhoek

Wild Dog kindly let me contact my travel insurance company Insure and Go, by phone.

 

Kudos to Insure and Go and here’s what I learned when needing medical assistance while traveling.

 

1. Call that collect # provided by the insurer in advance of seeking medical help, which I did.

2. Follow their instructions, which I thought I did, but it turns out I did not have the proper paperwork.

3. In the future I will bring with me a printout of the medical affidavit from the insurer’s website for the medical providers to fill out and sign when they provide service--which hopefully is never.

4. Follow up when you get back home and work with the case manager assigned.

 

Here’s the kudos part. I had only a handwritten receipt from the doctor for cash (Namibian dollars) payment and a credit card receipt from the pharmacy. I had none of the proper insurance company forms filled out by the doctor or pharmacy. But based on my account of events and these receipts Insure and Go (purchased through Insuremytrip.com) reimbursed me in full--$46.32 USD. That’s what a 15-minute doctor visit and 2 brand name prescriptions cost! I’m making my next appointment for my annual physical in Namibia!

 

The doctor visit was so prompt that I had time for the National Museum. The murals are breathtaking. No photos would do them justice. But I did take a picture of Dr. Sam Nujoma, the Founding President of Namibia.

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Dr. Sam Nujoma Founding President of Namibia, taken at the National Museum

I am hoping to someday return to Namibia for the Skeleton Coast and Swakopmund, maybe in Nov or Dec when the seals at Cape Cross give birth. I plan to use Wild Dog Safaris and Ian Brown again.

 

Trip #1 with Wild dog had the itinerary rework while the trip was in progress. Also I got lost for hours in the mountains at Aus, which had Ian worried sick. Can I help it if the trail signs were misleading or worse yet missing? This Trip #2 was at times a painful circus act in the back seat with at least one wild camping meal eaten prone on the ground, spooning cereal into my mouth as I turned my head sideways toward the bowl. So my goal for Trip #3 with Ian Brown and Wild Dog Safaris is to prove to them I can be a normal client and not a Lucy episode.

 

The End

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twaffle

I love your landscapes around Camp Kipwe, just stunning.

 

You are a true safari traveller, coping with pain that many of us would be daunted by. Well done and well done to your agents.

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Atravelynn

I love your landscapes around Camp Kipwe, just stunning.

 

You are a true safari traveller, coping with pain that many of us would be daunted by. Well done and well done to your agents. Thanks, and one more kudos to the Air Namibia desk agent who put me in a vacant row so I could use 2 seats for the yoga table top position, which offered relief, along with the pain medication.

 

 

Awesome trip report. Thanks @@Atravelynn. The vistas of Damaraland are indeed awesome!

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Dave Williams

Excellent report and much to whet my appetite for my trip next February.

Is it possible to visit Erongo Wilderness Lodge as a day visitor, have lunch there perhaps as well as a local walk ? We are due to stay fairly close by.

Thanks.Dave.

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Atravelynn

Excellent report and much to whet my appetite for my trip next February.

Is it possible to visit Erongo Wilderness Lodge as a day visitor, have lunch there perhaps as well as a local walk ? We are due to stay fairly close by.

Thanks.Dave.

Feb is just around the corner. You'll be seeing the region during greener times than I did.

 

That complimentary walk at Erongo departs daily in the morning. My understanding it was just for guests. But you might be able to hire a walking guide for your party. Similar for the afternoon drive, you could check about booking the guided excursion that takes you up to those fascinating painted caves. I know self drivers regularly booked the Palmwag Lodge activities even if they stayed elsewhere. That's a different place but it shows such practices exist.

 

I did the lunch-only thing at Grootberg. I would think you could have lunch at Erongo.

 

Do contact them and see what they suggest.

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Dave Williams

Thanks for the reply.

We are staying about 1500m away from Erongo Wilderness Lodge as it was £450 more expensive for a two night stop at the latter. More than I wanted to pay! In fact we are booked in to our accommodation, the Otjohotozu Guest farm twice, once on the way out west then again on our way south two weeks later so I will get a chance to at least take a trip up there. That said we will be sharing similar territory and hopefully there will be lots to see where we are staying too.

We are staying at Grootberg for 2 nights though where we have also booked in for a rhino trek. Bring it on!

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Atravelynn

Thanks for the reply.

We are staying about 1500m away from Erongo Wilderness Lodge as it was £450 more expensive for a two night stop at the latter. More than I wanted to pay! In fact we are booked in to our accommodation, the Otjohotozu Guest farm twice, once on the way out west then again on our way south two weeks later so I will get a chance to at least take a trip up there. That said we will be sharing similar territory and hopefully there will be lots to see where we are staying too.

We are staying at Grootberg for 2 nights though where we have also booked in for a rhino trek. Bring it on! Great!!

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michael-ibk

That Gerenuk Dik-Dik is too funny! Really love the Hoanib vistas, what a fantastic landscape, and your photos show it so well. The rising moon is a classic - even without Cheetah.

 

And hooray, the adapter post finally arrived! ;)

 

Another great, classic Atravelynn report - but no rest for you, do get started on the next one already! (It is a hard job when one is on safari all the time.) :)

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Atravelynn

That Gerenuk Dik-Dik is too funny! Really love the Hoanib vistas, what a fantastic landscape, and your photos show it so well. The rising moon is a classic - even without Cheetah.

 

And hooray, the adapter post finally arrived! ;) I must admit the photo is the one taken on the previous Namibia trip. But it is still accurate and I used those exact adapters pictured.

 

Another great, classic Atravelynn report - but no rest for you, do get started on the next one already! (It is a hard job when one is on safari all the time.) :) Yes sir!

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Brilliantr conclusion Lynn and you sound very cheertful (or maybe it is me). Love the cheetah in moonlight and how you handled the drama of the elephant vs warthog battle.

 

It was a very informative and beautiful episode of Lucy, this one.

 

 

Yes, looking forward to the next episode too.... forgot to mention that!

Edited by pault
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Atravelynn

Brilliantr conclusion Lynn and you sound very cheertful (or maybe it is me). Love the cheetah in moonlight and how you handled the drama of the elephant vs warthog battle.

 

It was a very informative and beautiful episode of Lucy, this one.

 

 

Yes, looking forward to the next episode too.... forgot to mention that!

Thanks Paul! The next epiosde has only a few moments of Lucy and Ethel, but nothing too zany or out of control.

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penolva

Glad to see the SX 50 still going strong. That moon shot is fantastic. I have used mine on every trip after you recommended it some time ago. Your trip to Tanzania I think. Pen

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@@Atravelynn

 

Yet another epic trip report! Thanks as it gave me some ideas for our next trip. One comment re. " I tend to think the average self driver could not make it from the Twyfelfontein area, after doing the typical activities in that area, to Erongo for the afternoon excursion in time because Ian knew a shortcut and was a confident driver even when roads were unpaved. " I have done a similar drive in 2014 (in the opposite direction) and it was not that complicated, completed in about 4 hours. Those unpaved roads were just OK, the worst part was crossing a couple of sandy bottom dry rivers.

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Galana

Thanks very much for sharing your trip with us all and commiserations for the pain you had to endure. It seems to have been worth it to judge by the results.

To answer a couple of queries raised in the text, Hobatere is now a community owned venture much as Grootberg is. How it works in practice or is funded I don't know as I have not been back since Steve and Louise Braine left. I do miss the Tree house too. Good memories of nights in there.

The track up to Grootberg looks a bit intimidating but it is fine in practice but not for 2WD of course.

I am on count down for my next trip and shall be staying at Khowarib to and from my way further north and hoping to find some Lions out there.

Finally, as I am a grazer on ST, I am not sure of the protocol here but in the interests of accuracy may I mention that three birds have the incorrect ID.

The Damara Hornbill(s) and Yellow-vented Bulbuls are Southern Yellow-billed (flying banana) Hornbill and Red eyed Bulbuls respectively. Your Black-bellied Bustard is the rarer endemic Ruppell's (koorhan).

None of this detracts from an excellent trip report.

Thanks once more.

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Atravelynn

The Damara Hornbill(s) and Yellow-vented Bulbuls are Southern Yellow-billed (flying banana) Hornbill A flying banana, now there's a cool name! and Red eyed Bulbuls respectively. Your Black-bellied Bustard is the rarer endemic Ruppell's (koorhan). Rarer is better.

None of this detracts from an excellent trip report.

Thanks once more Thanks for the bird IDs.

@@penolva - I did not upgrade to the SX60 but may be looking for something else in the next year. New and improved options all the time..

@@xelas - good drive time advice. We probably left the Twyfelfontaine area about 10:30-11:00 and with the stop to get take away lunch, got to Erongo about 3:10, just before the afternoon activity. That coincides with your experience.

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