Jump to content

The lion(s) and the ax


Bush dog

Recommended Posts

Bush dog

This happened in Selinda last month, just a few meters in front of Explorer’s Camp, along the spillway. Nine lions of the Selinda pride had decided to settle down there, for a while, as there was still some water on the bottom of the dry spillway.

 

post-48450-0-61946400-1482746188_thumb.jpg

 

 

During their games and exploration of the outskirts of the camp, some of the youngsters found a hammock. They began to try to detach it or rather to tear it away, which they succeeded in at one of its ends, but the other, despite their efforts, did not give way. As a result, they tore the hammock apart. The picture below shows the « crime scenery » before they found the hammock. It was, on the left side of the photo, left of the canopy, behind the bushes and the two trees.

 

post-48450-0-16429500-1482746224_thumb.jpg

 

We were in the late afternoon and the light was no longer very good, especially since the sky was overcast. On the other hand, because of the position, hidden from our view, of the hammock, one guessed more than one could see what was going on. So, no pictures of this part of the story.

 

The next pictures were taken at 13.000 to 51.000 ISO, between 6:30 and 7:00 p.m.

 

A little frustrated, at not being able to completely detach the hammock, the youngsters returned near the rest of the pride. However, a young lioness lingered and only returned moments after the others, with a new « prey », the ax in question, which had probably been forgotten there by a staff member.

 

post-48450-0-24280500-1482746272_thumb.jpgpost-48450-0-59532900-1482746274_thumb.jpg

 

But the lioness was not really motivated to keep it. So, after examining it, it left it near the young males. At once, one of them took possession and played with it, until the iron slid along the handle to fall on its muzzle, which caused the occupants of the three vehicles present to laugh more enthusiastically than ever.

 

post-48450-0-91748000-1482746311_thumb.jpgpost-48450-0-01843500-1482746317_thumb.jpg

 

But that was not a problem, it succeeded, by some miracle, to put it back in its place.

 

post-48450-0-73156900-1482746354_thumb.jpgpost-48450-0-64068400-1482746358_thumb.jpg

 

While showing off, it went from one to the other, flaunting its « prey ».

 

post-48450-0-18342800-1482746402_thumb.jpgpost-48450-0-45777900-1482746413_thumb.jpgpost-48450-0-93715500-1482746446_thumb.jpg

 

Although their size was already impressive, those youngsters still remained children. History does not say what it did with it after we were gone and especially soon after when the two dominant males arrived and made it flee, it and its brothers.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
michael-ibk

A really extraordinary sighting, and very impressed how these pictures look despite the ISO numbers!

Link to post
Share on other sites
Bush dog

@@michael-ibk

 

Though I made some pictures at high ISO, last March, in Hwange, I was again stunned by those.

Link to post
Share on other sites

@@Bush dog One of the places that I'm planning to stay in 2018 is Selinda Explorer's Camp; I have to say that your photos are giving me even more encouragement to do so. I know that I'll just love being in the bush and of course

the sightings of wild dogs and everything else I know are outstanding. I think that those additional photos of the lions with axes are just priceless.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Atravelynn

You even managed to show the iron in two positions--pre and post sliding down the handle. The axe was a hit with the pride and the pride-with-the-axe was a hit with the clients. Now that was a sighting you could never have expected.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Incredible series! Must have been such an exciting--and humorous--experience! Love it!!

Link to post
Share on other sites
Bush dog

@@optig

 

Sorry, I pushed on a wrong button, I start again.

 

Thanks a lot for your comments.

 

A good idea you are planning to go there in 2018. If it becomes a reality, ask to be on Victor's car, he is a great guide and tracker.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Bush dog

@@Atravelynn

 

Well, Lynn, every trip in the bush brings unexpected sightings, but I must admit this one was not only unexpected, but also comical.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Bush dog

@@janzin

 

Thank you so much for your comments. My feeling of it is that it was more humerous than exciting. Indeed in one of the cars there were residents of Explorer's Camp. A lot of jokes were made on the fact that, with all those lions around, they should perhaps have to spend the night in their vehicle. :)

Link to post
Share on other sites

@@Bush dog I spoke recently to Sangeeta who just returned from a working vacation in Botswana, interesting enough she said that the best lodge she stayed was simply Selinda Explorer's Camp becasue it offers the best sighting of wild dogs, as well as the best bush experience. She also said that Motswiri which is known primarily for riding and walking was surprisingly good for wildlife. Sangeeta also mentioned that Lagoon which I stayed at three times and Lebala ahichI've been to twice have had major renovations. I will mention to Sangeeta that I want to be guided by Victor. Thanks again

Link to post
Share on other sites
Kitsafari

@@Bush dog what a fun sighting you had! despite the lack of light, the photos were still clear. the hammock and the axe were new toys for the sub adults and it is always great to see the lighter moments of the lions rather than the dozing moments!

Link to post
Share on other sites
madaboutcheetah

Hi Mike, these are the most extraordinary set of Lion images I've seen!!! amazing!

Link to post
Share on other sites

What a charming set of photos of thee cubs! Glad we finally have the story revealed!

Link to post
Share on other sites
Bush dog

@@optig

 

Explorer's Camp is indeed well located, closer to the area where usually wild dogs are seen. That's where I saw them in March this year and in the distance last November. That's also where I saw them, in the past, on several occasions. From Main Camp it was very easy to go there in a short time but since there is water again in the spillway, a large and long detour is necessary to reach this part of the concession and further the lagoon. I'm glad to hear that wildlife is again good in the Motswiri area. I went there ten years ago, there were just shy elephants and some lions but that was soon after they stopped hunting.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have to say that I just love the fact that in all of these ex-hunting areas of Botswana, the wildlife has not only returned,it has thrived. I hope that the same results will occur in other areas.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Sangeeta

@@Bush dog - we really, really need that secret Safaritalk handshake. I happened to be chatting with @@madaboutcheetah about this same axe incident, and he told me "You must have met Mike at SEC because he has described the exact same incident!!" What a small world! I was the solo with the charming young lady in Vic's car :) And we chatted and shared meals without having the faintest inkling of who we really were!

 

Once I have sorted through my pics, I'll add a few on to this thread of yours, if you don't mind. That was a truly crazy day at what I've now decided to call Wapuka Explorers Camp :) Naughty lions, terrible tssessebe parents & dogs too.

 

I went to Motswiri after SEC where the wildlife was astonishing. The terrain is thick & bushy so they def need more than 1 car to scout around, but I saw a herd of 1000s upon 1000s of buffalo there, not to mention 1000s of eles (migrating from the Chobe riverfront down to the delta), big herds of eland, sable and lots of roan too. There is great potential here to develop something in addition to the riding.

 

And Vic had asked me to check on the Selinda pack of dogs with Motswiri. Turns out, they were born near the Motswiri airstrip & Motswiri calls them the Motswiri pack :)

I checked on their movements - the day after we saw them at SEC, they were at Motswiri relaxing. Which means that these dogs easily can do 50-75 kilometers through the wildest terrain in a single day. And the same pack is the Motswiri pack, Selinda pack and possibly also the Lebala pack!

 

@@optig - we'll def request Vic for you. He was my guide there and fantastic.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Sageeta-as you know I'd love stay at Motswiri in addition to all the other places that I'm planning on staying,but they would have to offer serious game drives. I love the fact that at Gonorezhou as well as in Mana Pools you can combine walking with game drives. The same is true with Kichaka Camp in Ruaha National Park in Tanzania. I love to walk while on safari but I wouldn't stay at a camp lodge again where the emphasis was exclusively on walking. I prefer to combine walking wth game drives or even better night drives.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Bush dog

@@Sangeeta

 

Thanks a lot for your comments. Indeed, I remember you and the charming young lady in Victor's car. We shared on several occasions the same sightings, but I was not staying at SEC. I was, with my wife, at Main Camp and during the game drives in Mots' car. Mots is an old friend who guided me for the first time, more than twelve years ago, when I was staying at Zib Camp and, when he was still only a beginner. I think you mistook me for the the guy that was in Mokopi's car.

 

It is wonderful that wildlife has returned to Motswiri.

 

You are more than welcome to add some of your pictures and impressions on to this thread and later, if you wish, when I will come to its Selinda part, on my other topic "Shinde dogs and Selinda cats"

Link to post
Share on other sites

@@Sangeeta @@Bush dog I only hope that Motswiri will serve as an example for other hunting concessions in Tanzania, Namibia, Zimbabwe, and Zambia. I also wish that the government of Mozambique would show

some interest in developing wildlife tourism. Frankly I think it's just obscene that there's an elephant quota for Mozambique when it's elephant population has been so badly hit by poaching. I'm glad that Tanzania has decided

to halve it's elephan quota for next year.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Safaritalk uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. By using Safaritalk you agree to our use of cookies. If you wish to refuse the setting of cookies you can change settings on your browser to clear and block cookies. However, by doing so, Safaritalk may not work properly and you may not be able to access all areas. If you are happy to accept cookies and haven't adjusted browser settings to refuse cookies, Safaritalk will issue cookies when you log on to our site. Please also take a moment to read the Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy: Terms of Use l Privacy Policy