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SHOW US YOUR HYRAX IMAGES.


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johnweir

I may have missed a trick here, but there doesn't appear to be a thread dedicated to the 'enigmatic' Hyrax, apparently the elephant's closest living relative. (If already represented could the site manager please amalgamate these images into the appropriate thread, thanks).

​ A few images are attached of this endearing small mammal, to get things started. I am not expecting this thread to be the best supported on the site but would love to see some more images of this commonly sighted mammal, a sighting of which enhances any safari. Tree Hyrax images would be nice.

 

Image 1. Rock Hyrax. Procavia capensis, taken July 2015, northern Serengeti.

Image 2. Juvenile, same location.

Image 3. Bush Hyrax. Heterohyrax brucei, family group, taken July 2016, Tarangire N.P.

Image 4. Adult, same location.

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I may have missed a trick here, but there doesn't appear to be a thread dedicated to the 'enigmatic' Hyrax, apparently the elephant's closest living relative. (If already represented could the site ma

Another one:   kirstenboch 013 Rock Hyrax (Dassie) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

Seronera picnic area, June 2008     Erongo Wilderness Lodge, September 2014  

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Treepol

Seronera picnic area, June 2008

 

pu5USALzHsg7mnz1dNWKu4evSkOMwOBNvLTas5lh

 

Erongo Wilderness Lodge, September 2014

 

At9SLvXl_VOjIUAk_R3nH4K5YjrWQhff6p9gl8ue

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Peter Connan

The little one is very cute @@Treepol

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Soukous
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Soukous
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johnweir

Thanks to the contributors to this thread so far. All are wonderful images and very interesting. The feet are fascinating, no claws apparently can see some physical similarity with the elephant! Must be more images out there, please post.

Edited by johnweir
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Pennyanne

A few photos taken in May, 2016 in the grounds of Erongo Wilderness Lodge, Namibia:

 

 

 

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Edited by Pennyanne
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The ones at Erongo Wilderness Lodge broke into our tent and stole my chocolates!

 

Elsa's Kopje, Meru

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Ithumba, Tsavo East (watching Rodney watch the elephants)

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Ben mosquito

Nakuru NP, Kenya july 2010 on top of baboon cliff. Interaction between hyrax and baboon : nice souvenirs.

 

 

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Ben Mosquito @ I love the photo of the hyrax and the baboon together.

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johnweir

When I started this thread I was hoping for some response, but never envisaged we would end up in such a short period of time with so many superb images. Thank you to the most recent contributors, Patty and Ben mosquito, great images.

 

Patty, not entirely sure who looks the happiest Rodney or the hyrax, incidentally stayed in Carmel a couple of times, a wonderful place to live.

 

Special thanks to WildSolutions for posting the link to the excellent page on Hyrax sightings and distribution, it is well worth a look and includes 203 hyrax images and the locations in which they were taken. Tree hyrax images are included. A fantastic resource, are other species maps available?

 

Having scrutinised all the images I have come to the conclusion that Images 1 & 2, posted by myself are Bush Hyrax not Rock Hyrax as stated. I apologise for this error, and have amended my diary notes accordingly. Rock Hyrax are found in the northern Serengeti, but clearly not at this site as stated by our guide. Hopefully will get some Rock Hyrax images in Namibia this Summer.

 

18 images submitted so far and I make it Bush Hyrax 9, Rock Hyrax 9. Please if you have any Hyrax images, submit them, quality unimportant, location appreciated. There must be a member out there with a Tree Hyrax image.

 

Thank you again to all concerned.

 

 

 

 

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WildSolutions

Thank you John! Photographic maps of various African primates (including galagos) and both species of warthog are available on: http://www.wildsolutions.nl/photography/photomap/

 

We appreciate contributions to any of these maps. If you have images to share, preferably from areas we have no images for yet, please contact me at yvonne@wildsolutions.nl

 

Thanks!!!

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@@johnweir we've been here 3 years and love it! I took that photo of Rodney right after we told him that the hyrax had been there a while unbeknownst to him.

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@@johnweir What are you basing your switch of identification on? I think we neex to get into the differences as there seem to be a lot of misconceptions about who is who. i'm not going to be the one to clear those up but I bet I can muddy the waters further!

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johnweir

Thanks for contributing to the thread, at the time of taking Images 1 & 2 close to Sayari Camp in the northern Serengeti I was clearly told by our guide that I was observing a family group of Rock Hyrax. As they were the first Hyrax I had seen I had nothing to compare them with so just accepted his word. Both Rock & Bush Hyrax are known to occur in this region often on the same kopjes. (Larger Mammals of Tanzania, Foley et al. 2014). It was only when I set up this thread that I started having some doubts about the identification of my images, particularly whilst comparing to the images taken by others. Inspection of numerous images from a variety of sources drew me towards the conclusion that all 4 of my images were indeed of Bush Hyrax. WildSolutions photo-map posted on this thread (18/1/2017) seemed to confirm this too.

 

I have tended to use the following physical characteristics to determine the species:

 

ROCK HYRAX: yellow /cream underparts, less pronounced white markings above the eyes, shorter more stubby snout, generally more robust build.

 

BUSH HYRAX: white underparts, white markings above the eyes are often more defined, sharper more pointed snout, slender build in comparison.

 

I would point out that my views are subjective and would welcome the views of other more experienced enthusiasts. Let's "Muddy the Waters".

Edited by johnweir
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Overweight with yellow underpants vs slender with white underpants?

 

@@johnweir I susupect you are exhibiting favoritism and interpreting your photos to suit!

 

 

 

 

 

Edit: Oh sorry, I think I may have misread. :o

Edited by pault
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Seriously, as you probably realise they are both actually rock hyraxes and both are "bush hyraxes" when they want to be, and (worst of all ) they inhabit the same habitats and will happily mingle (although not mate). Plus, there is a tremendous variation in both, espeically in terms of size and colouration. While you can say the rock hyrax is bigger and darker and stouter, it is all in general. No arguing they are different spedcies but apart from the snout (but then the young of trhe larger rock hyrax seem to have a longer snout too) and a lighter colour I am often stumped by identification when faced with them in the wild. Sometimes it's clear. Rock Hyrax is the safe guess though, because if someone says too patronisingly for your liking "Actually that is a bush hyrax" you have the snappy comeback "Yellow-spotted Rock Hyrax actually, but yes they are commonly called bush hyrax". Not for use with kindly people of course - just the annoying ones!

 

 

I didn't hear about the soiled underpants on the Rock Hyrax before though.. Lighter overall waas all i had in my head. Looking at pictures I can see that and together with the other characteristics it helps!

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i-pVPmmqW-XL.jpg

 

Bit of a pointy-faced, skinny rock hyrax? But what about the coloour of the erect hairs around the dorsal gland?

 

 

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A long-snouted bush hyrax with yellowish underparts - or are they the cream variation?

 

 

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Are those underparts cream or yellow?

 

 

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Looks like a Rock Hyrax but could it be a dark bush one? Is there really any difference from the previous one, taken on the same rocks?

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WildSolutions

Dear John,

I agree with your comment above "Having scrutinised all the images I have come to the conclusion that Images 1 & 2, posted by myself are Bush Hyrax not Rock Hyrax as stated. I apologise for this error, and have amended my diary notes accordingly. Rock Hyrax are found in the northern Serengeti, but clearly not at this site as stated by our guide. Hopefully will get some Rock Hyrax images in Namibia this Summer" ...your first two images appear to be bush hyrax indeed. Great photos :) Thanks!

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johnweir

Thanks to WildSolutions for clearing up my hyrax species identification issues.

 

Pault, "I suspect you are exhibiting favouritism and interpreting your photo's to suit", not entirely sure what this means. Only motive was an attempt at species accuracy.

I would also point out that I don't tend to find other people's views "too patronising for my liking", just healthy.

 

Thanks for posting your images Pault they are excellent and very interesting, certainly adding to this thread.

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@johnweir Forgive me. I do understand your motive, agree with your IDs (not that my opinion should be paid too much attention to) and was just joking. The other comment was absolutely not aimed at you. I am honestly enrhusastic about your interest in hyrax identification.

 

Sorry - you'll either get used to me or just learn to ignore the stupid stuff.

Edited by pault
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