Jump to content

Mission Impossible! An epic road trip in search of some of South Africa’s rarest mammals


kittykat23uk

Recommended Posts

kittykat23uk

Also seen were Cape Siskin, Red-winged Starling and Southern Double-collared Sunbirds, zipped around the fynbos.

 

37087650564_f757b851a6_c.jpg

P9181362 Cape Siskin by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

37538912440_9aa329586b_c.jpg

P9181376 Red-winged Starling by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

37538909710_6c4709666d_c.jpg

Southern Double-collared Sunbird by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

37748594246_d7ae33029d_c.jpg

P9181398 Southern Double-collared Sunbird by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

Mammals were also in evidence with excellent views on the way back out of the park of Eland and Bontebok with a couple of Bonteboklets in tow.   

 

37538904130_3cd4294b97_c.jpg

P9181463 Eland by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

37765240932_ab4da42d0e_c.jpg

P9181524 Eland by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

37765238772_ecac90e678_c.jpg

P9181535 Eland by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

37765235472_8672966f9f_c.jpg

P9181654 Bontebok by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

37765233402_af1e04f7ff_c.jpg

P9181662 Bontebok by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

37748580996_c1feb673c7_c.jpg

P9181707 Bontebok & Bonteboklet by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

37087623224_a359d1db96_c.jpg

P9181720 Bontebok by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

37748574616_17be0e4570_c.jpg

P9181739 Bonteboklets by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

37748571826_cbc674d429_c.jpg

P9181760 Bontebok by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

 

After stopping to get a takeaway pizza in Simonstown, we arrived back at our B&B and our host Mirinda informed us of the possibility of porcupine after dark. We staked out the garden and were rewarded when a large Porcupine wandered through at 20:00. Unfortunately I didn’t manage to get a shot off before it continued on it’s mission across the cliff terraces.

Edited by kittykat23uk
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 206
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • kittykat23uk

    109

  • Towlersonsafari

    10

  • Peter Connan

    10

  • janzin

    8

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

The night however was still productive as soon after we saw the rabbit we had, according to Manus an even rarer sight for him, a tiny baby Porcupine with its mum. We spent a considerable amount of tim

17/09/17 Gansbaai and Table Mountain   We had kept our plans for our first days around the Cape quite open, as many of the excursions we wanted to do were weather dependent, like West Coast.

Also seen were Cape Siskin, Red-winged Starling and Southern Double-collared Sunbirds, zipped around the fynbos.   P9181362 Cape Siskin by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P9181376

janzin

love the Bonteboklets! :)  You got lots of great birds and bird photos, and beautiful sunny weather...not always the case in the Cape.

Link to post
Share on other sites
pomkiwi

@kittykat23uk Enjoying the report and photos but very sympathetic to your guide issues. We had a similar exoerience in South America and although it got resolved after I complained it wasn't pleasant and did feel as though we'd lost a day.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Peter Connan

Beautiful birds and animals. I really like the cormorants shot down from the cliffs.

 

Pity you didn't get to spend more time in Kirstenbosch. I would gladly skip boulders altogether for more time at Kirstenbosch.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Treepol

@kittykat23uk so sorry to hear you had a sort of sleepless night worrying over guide issues, this is not what holidays are about! Such a shame.

 

Thanks for the tip of the motorised tour of Kirstenbosch, we may have time for that this year. Great photos of the Cape Sugarbird in the protea garden, and also a very nice shot of the Orange-breasted Sunbird, hope I can do as well this August. The Malachite and Double-collared Sunbirds are good too. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
Ratdcoops

Great photos.

I Feel a connection to this report as we took my Mother in Law to on our last trip to Africa after she lost her husband of 40 yearsonly one month prior. It was an honour to spend this time with her but was a very tough time for her. 

As part of that trip we travelled from Cape Town to PE via the Garden Route. Like yourself felt we could have spent more time at Kirstenbosch. 

Well done to not let this "guide" ruin your trip.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Alexander33

The Cape is always lovely, but you certainly managed to catch it during a period of brilliant sunshine.  Good work on the Orange-breasted Sunbird at Kirstenbosch -- they eluded us, and not for lack of any trying on our part.  You got some great shots of the Cape Mountain Zebras and the Bonteboks.

 

My condolences on the loss of your grandfather -- and for the travails with your guide.  I'm looking forward to seeing how you resolved that.

Link to post
Share on other sites
kittykat23uk

Thanks everyone. Much appreciated! 

Link to post
Share on other sites
kittykat23uk

19/09/17 Boulders Beach to Swellendam

 

We had another very leisurely start waiting for our guide and the day started very differently to the previous one with overcast skies and very few birds.

 

37128486963_bb722b5d9c_c.jpg

P9190005 Sunrise at Simon's Town by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

37766545352_58c2c1847c_c.jpg

P9190008 Sunrise at Simon's Town by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

37128485223_ffc5078137_c.jpg

P9190009 Sunrise at Simon's Town by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

We did however, see a pod of three Southern Right Whales with a calf and a distant school of Dolphins (not sure what species).

 

 

 

Our guide phoned at 0930 to say he was only just leaving. This was taking the proverbial and I decided to take  matters into my own hands and asked Mirinda if she could arrange a taxi to Boulders for us. Instead, she kindly offered to drive us there herself and we were very grateful for her kind offer.

 

37750226156_e9a6aca4c4_c.jpg

P9190002 Cape Canary by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

37540440450_45bcd72713_c.jpg

P1018834 Boulders beach viewed from the walk down to entrance by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

37798557501_934b10281b_c.jpg

P1018841 alien trees! by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

We walked along the boardwalk to the entrance, seeing more African Penguins and some lovely Dassies along the way.

37128473253_faac7e2525_c.jpg

P9190062 Dassie AKA Rock Hyrax by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

23945789808_e8d33946a2_c.jpg

P9190078 Dassie AKA Rock Hyrax by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

37128469273_77365f95c0_c.jpg

P9190082 Dassie AKA Rock Hyrax by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

Having visited Betty’s Bay in 2010 it was nice to be able to compare it with Boulders. Betty’s bay is more rocky in the sense that the rocks are much more jagged and there seemed to be a much more densely packed colony there.

 

37766554892_e07e2f171f_c.jpg

P1018844 African Penguins by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

37540436100_0e6e72cc58_c.jpg

P1018846 African Penguins by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

37766553782_09526d8fab_c.jpg

P1018850 African Penguins by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

37128434683_dee18e1775_c.jpg

P9190002-1 African Penguins by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

37766541092_ca373b1761_c.jpg

P9190011 African Penguins by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

37128481773_5f54c0b58c_c.jpg

P9190017 African Penguins by Jo Dale, on Flickr

Edited by kittykat23uk
Link to post
Share on other sites
kittykat23uk

Boulders beach in contrast is dominated by, naturally, some very large smooth boulders and a sandy beach. So they are both very different settings and I’m pleased to have visited both locations.  

 

23945784968_d7c5cc922c_c.jpg

P9190092 Karoo Prinia by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

37750187656_edb709b892_c.jpg

P9190117 African Penguins by Jo Dale, on Flickr

   

African Penguins are not doing well here. They were reclassified on 26 May 2010 from a Vulnerable to now Endangered status. In 1956 when the first full census was conducted on the African Penguin, there were approximately 150 000 breeding pairs counted. In 2009 there were only 26 000 breeding pairs left in the world. These numbers indicate a loss of more than 80% of breeding pairs in just over 50 years.

 

37766518712_e7194b2bdd_c.jpg

P9190160 African Penguin by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

37128432333_11e11ebf0c_c.jpgP9190168.ORF African Penguin by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

37766515992_679dd6d41d_c.jpg

P9190232 Dassie AKA Rock Hyrax by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

37128429883_91c297e731_c.jpgP9190256.ORF African Penguins by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

The Boulders Penguin Colony was established in 1983 and numbers increased from surrounding island colonies to bring breeding numbers to 3 900 birds in 2005. Since then there has been a decrease. The 2011 figures sit at around 2100 birds at Boulders Penguin Colony. The decline at Boulders and the global decline is the suspected result of:

  1. habitat destruction
  2. effects of oil spills and other marine pollution
  3. impacts of global warming on fish stocks and fish movement
  4. over fishing
  5. irresponsible tourism activities
  6. domestic pets/animals

For more information on how to help the plight of the African Penguin, contact SANCCOB on +27(0) 21 557 6155.

 

37128424573_aa78fe0471_c.jpg

P9190289. African Penguins by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

37540383170_59cc42654f_c.jpg

P9190382. African Penguins by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

37540380480_c1b8e0e520_c.jpg

P9190399. African Penguins by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

37750139376_1bcf7e2f71_c.jpg

P9190406. African Penguin by Jo Dale, on Flickr

Edited by kittykat23uk
Link to post
Share on other sites
kittykat23uk

So we spent about an hour with the Penguins before we saw Our guide gesticulating to us and pointing back towards the car park. We headed that way but somehow completely missed our guide. We arrived a the minibus and were waiting there for at least 20 to 30 minutes, I even went to get us a couple of cups of tea, before our guide finally reappeared.

 

37798505921_7f75c97ed1_c.jpg

P9190414. African Penguin by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

37766513072_0a3a827774_c.jpg

P9190427 African Penguin by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

37540376940_5a64acdabf_c.jpg

P9190444. African Penguin by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

37798504171_94ae30e8fd_c.jpg

P9190452 African Penguins by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

37750133966_9554d551db_c.jpg

P9190458. African Penguins by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

37128442663_2bcc640543_c.jpg

P9190561 African Penguin by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

37766507292_ac0594fae0_c.jpg

P9190577 African Penguins & Dassie by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

37540373830_b4265cb4aa_c.jpg

P9190588. African Penguin by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

37750131436_d38710871e_c.jpg

P9190591. African Penguins by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

 

Edited by kittykat23uk
Link to post
Share on other sites
kittykat23uk

37766625402_580511100b_c.jpg

P9190611 Laughing Dove by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

We then drove direct to Swellendam, well I say direct, we actually seemed to take the wrong road and we had to stop a couple of times to ask for directions. We had planned to visit Bontebok National Park that afternoon and then De Hoop the following day.

 

37540492630_da43d27d9d_c.jpg

P9190661 Cape Weaver & Southern grey-headed Sparrow by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

37128596473_36f993bcd3_c.jpg

P9190672 Greater Double-collared Sunbird by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

37540487540_ce570e6359_c.jpg

P9190683 Fork-tailed Drongo by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

37540482690_a59249d7c3_c.jpg

P9190732 Female Greater Double-collared Sunbird by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

From some advice I received from @Safaridude when finalising our plans a couple of months before, I asked if we should try and swap our accommodation to stay in De Hoop and forget Bontebok. I did float this suggestion with the safari company and again with our guide but neither of them we responsive on that point and, as Aan D’Oevre B&B seemed like a lovely place to stay, with close access to Bontebok NP I decided not to push the matter. In hindsight, I think this was a mistake. As lovely as the B&B was, our two nights here turned out not the be as well-spent as we might have liked and a night at De Hoop would have given us the, probably very remote, chance of glimpsing a caracal, zorilla or other rare mammal.

 

37128588543_ee4c919641_c.jpg

P9190734 Female Greater Double-collared Sunbird by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

As it happened, we didn’t get to visit Bontebok NP for two reasons:

  1. We didn’t arrive at Swellendam until 15:30 and the B&B is unmanned in the evenings which means we had to check in before 5pm
  2. Our guide had been advised that De Hoop had everything that Bontebok NP has in spades and as a result he was very reluctant to take us there.

37766616862_92fb0d4cc0_c.jpg

P9190750 Southern Masked Weaver by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

On the way into Swellendam we passed some clear signage to De Hoop, so I thought that if we made an early start the next day we should be able to get a full day in.  As we’d had already good sightings of Bontebok and Cape Mountain Zebra at Cape Point, skipping a few hours at Bontebok park did not seem to be a big deal, but I personally wished we could have fit it in.

 

37128584093_5faa2bf910_c.jpg

P9190759 Southern Masked Weaver by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

We therefore reluctantly agreed to drop Bontebok and head straight to the B&B.  

 

The B&B itself was absolutely lovely, we had a well stocked minibar and complimentary sherry in our room. Lots of bird feeders attracted an array of avian delights, including Laughing Dove, Cape Weaver, Southern Grey-headed Sparrow, Streaky-headed Seed-eater, Cape Robin-Chat, Greater double-collared Sunbird, and Southern Masked Weaver. A flock of Cape White-eye were feeding in a huge bottlebrush tree.

 

37798601331_9bc4256d8c_c.jpg

P9190766 Cape Weaver by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

Our guide asked about restaurants and our hosts pointed us to a copy of their welcome pack which contains details of a number of restaurants and their menus. We settled on one that was closeby called Drostdy, it’s a heritage building as well as a restaurant, a very nice setting.

 

37128578953_5c79a870b6_c.jpg

P9190775 Flower by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

37088956134_355dfd4d55_c.jpg

P9190855 Cape White-eye by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

37798591531_2e088df224_c.jpg

P9190861 Cape White-eye by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

37088954794_4f46089c3d_c.jpg

P9190865  Streaky-headed Seedeater by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

37798587291_2d8f8cb246_c.jpg

P9190874 Cape Robin-chat by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

37750283336_94af3eca3a_c.jpg

P9190875 Cape Robin-chat by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

 

We had an eventful time just trying to leave the car park through the electric gate when our guide reversed into it before it was fully open, deftly knocking it off it’s hinges! It was just as well the staff had gone home for the night as he managed to put it back and get it working before anyone noticed.

 

We only had a main course and I chose the trio of venison, which was delicious. Unfortunately the atmosphere of the meal was completely spoilt by our guide, whose complaints about the cost of the food were very vocal when the bill arrived and personally I found this to be hugely embarrassing. So with that parting shot we returned to our accommodation and headed to bed.

 

37798582841_89e4e11a53_c.jpg

P9190881 Cape Robin-chat by Jo Dale, on Flickr

Edited by kittykat23uk
Link to post
Share on other sites
Peter Connan

I am starting to get really annoyed with Mel, so I can only imagine how bad it must have been for you!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Lovely collection of birds so far.

Link to post
Share on other sites
penolva

Sorry to hear about your grandfather.  How he could take you to WCNP and not mention Postburg is a disgrace. His behaviour at the restaurant is beyond belief. ? Pen

Link to post
Share on other sites
elefromoz

@kittykat23uk, You have so many really pretty Birds in there already, and the Bonteboks are a lovely animal.

Link to post
Share on other sites
kittykat23uk
16 hours ago, penolva said:

Sorry to hear about your grandfather.  How he could take you to WCNP and not mention Postburg is a disgrace. His behaviour at the restaurant is beyond belief. ? Pen

 

Thanks all for following along. Yes it was really exasperating and this continued for two whole weeks. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
kittykat23uk

20/09/17 De Hoop Nature Reserve

 

De Hoop Nature Reserve has the largest conserved area of lowland fynbos in the Western Cape. Of the 9 000 plant species found in the Cape floral region, the reserve and its surrounds have an estimated 1 500 species.

De Hoop has 86 mammal species, such as the rare bontebok and Cape mountain zebra, as well as eland, grey rhebok, baboon, yellow mongoose, caracal and the occasional leopard. The nature reserve also has more than 260 bird species, including many water birds living around the De Hoop vlei. Potberg is home to the only remaining breeding colony of the rare Cape vulture in the Western Cape. The De Hoop MPA does not only protect the reserve and the coastline. It also stretches three nautical miles into the sea, protecting dolphins, seals, southern right whales and at least 250 species of fish.

 

I asked to make an early start so that we could get a full day in at De Hoop and so we left at 06:05, after I’d sighted a Giant Kingfisher along the stream that backs onto the property. Unfortunately, instead of taking the direct route to De Hoop (the one that had been signposted) Our guide took us on a magical mystery tour across the Malgas Pontoon down to Witsand, which was nowhere near the actual nature reserve so we then had to return back via the pontoon, got lost trying to find a route across farmland and eventually got to De Hoop around 11:30. Not quite the early start that I had in mind and our guide insisted on heading back at 16:30.

 

37541013240_62f95e8537_c.jpg

P9200034 Malgas Ferry by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

37540998610_c7dda60e46_c.jpg

P9200134 adj Southern Red Bishop by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

37541009160_4935e554a2_c.jpg

P9200039 Malgas Ferry by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

37767039992_c97fd23e8a_c.jpg

P9200040 Malgas Ferry by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

Our magical mystery tour was not devoid of wildlife and we sighted many little birds perched on the wire fences around the farmland, mainly these were chats and Capped Wheatears- they seemed so common I didn’t ask to stop to take photos. This was a mistake, as we didn’t see any elsewhere, or on the way back.

 

We did, however stop to take photographs of the magnificent Blue Cranes that were present in good numbers. Also present in little ponds were Spur-winged Geese and Egyptian Geese and a Hammerkop struggling with a large toad or frog.

 

When we crossed the Malgas Pontoon we saw several Southern Red Bishops noisily flitting about the reeds and White-throated Swallows perched on the cables of the pontoon. Also seen were African Pipit and African Pied Starling.

 

37129118833_6826b04dc9_c.jpg

P9200017 Giant Kingfisher by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

37766979302_66bea9030d_c.jpg

P9200037-1 Blue Cranes by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

37750773026_1accd7e606_c.jpg

P9200070. Blue Crane by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

37129100383_601131a04a_c.jpg

P9200210 Spur-winged Goose by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

37750772436_9b7a27565c_c.jpgP9200224.ORF Spur-winged Goose & Hammerkop by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

37089388704_ab6376c1ac_c.jpg

P9200242. Blue Crane & Spur-winged Geese by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

23946307408_855664e164_c.jpg

P9200260 African Pipit by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

23946304438_eef4287a11_c.jpg

P9200295 Blue Cranes & Egyptian Geese by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

37750802686_c3f14b9d87_c.jpg

P9200327 Blue Cranes & Egyptian Geese by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

37750799636_83e6558053_c.jpg

P9200334 Blue Cranes & Egyptian Geese by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

 

37767010222_37ed203014_c.jpg

P9200393 Blue Cranes & Egyptian Geese by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by kittykat23uk
Link to post
Share on other sites
kittykat23uk

We stopped briefly in Witsand to whale watch but it was incredibly windy and exposed. I’m not quite sure what was in our guide’s mind about Witsand, I think he was under the impression that we couldn’t whale watch at De Hoop, or maybe he thought that Witsand was part of De Hoop or there was a route through to De Hoop? Whatever the reason, and for the benefit of anyone else who might be planning a visit, it is not necessary to go to Witsand if one wants to whale watch, as De Hoop also has excellent coastal views. We saw whales at both locations. At De Hoop they were closer to the shore. From De Hoop we saw a mother and a calf Southern Right Whale.

 

Once we finally made our way to De Hoop we first encountered some more Chacma Baboons. Bontebok, Ostriches and Cape Mountain Zebra were all present. The Fynbos and white dunes provided a beautiful backdrop to the pied buck. A Cape Grassbird was singing its heart out from the top of a bush.

 

37750794096_8b37f6e7fa_c.jpg

P9200426 Chacma Baboon by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

37750792026_b35aa2c739_c.jpg

P9200428 Chacma Baboon by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

37129077353_3d119f10e5_c.jpg

P9200443 Bontebok by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

37750787926_2c1c5bfc6f_c.jpg

P9200449 Bontebok by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

37129073913_1313514dcc_c.jpg

P9200474 Ostrich by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

23946291688_0b4e6949a2_c.jpg

P9200484 Ostrich by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

37799029241_a9d04b6e5f_c.jpg

P9200533 Cape Francolin by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

 

23946286698_e812d905d1_c.jpg

P9200548 Bontebok by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

23946281238_b07d8c52af_c.jpg

P9200572 Bontebok by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

37799026111_51151a4118_c.jpg

P9200576 Cape Grassbird by Jo Dale, on Flickr
 

Whilst whalewatching, a trio of African Black Oystercatchers flew past. Mum was also fascinated to see a pair of dung beetles fighting over a ball of dung.

 

23946274058_87b86221c9_c.jpg

P9200632 Black Oystercatchers by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

37089398144_43893a78dd_c.jpg

P9200663 dung beetles by Jo Dale, on Flickr


We left the park at 16:30 and  headed back to Swellendam. As our guide had made us feel so uncomfortable about having a meal in the restaurant, we looked at options for a takeaway. We found a pub that served takeaway pizza and decided to share one.

 

37541005160_bb11687002_c.jpg

P9200042 Drive to De Hoop by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

37767034942_e5f0e58893_c.jpg

P9200044 Drive to De Hoop by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

37694344981_ef07862430_c.jpg20170920_170704 Road from De Hoop to Swellendam by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

 

 

Ordering dinner was delayed by a few hours as our guide decided he wanted to go and clean the minibus and told us he would come and get us to go to order the take away when he got back. The problem was, due to the setup of the rooms, there was a locked gate that our guide couldn’t open between his room at the front, and our room at the back. So it was only when I went to find him later that evening, that I discovered that he’d be back for hours.

 

Again, he misjudged the gate and knocked it a couple of times before we managed to get out of the B&B. After ordering the pizza at the pub, our guide was pacing around like a caged tiger whilst we waited for it to be prepared.  After this faffing around, we ended up eating quite late, but the pizza was very tasty.

Edited by kittykat23uk
Link to post
Share on other sites
Treepol

@kittykat23uk I can see why you were so unhappy with Mel, what a lot of wasted time hat could have been spent game viewing.

 

I like the photos of the Blue Cranes and there seemed to be good numbers of them too.

Link to post
Share on other sites
SafariChick

My frustration just reading about Mel and all the missteps is growing with every post, can only imagine how it felt to be living it! Continuing to enjoy the lovely photos. Those bonteboks are really interesting looking.

Link to post
Share on other sites
kittykat23uk

Thanks both, oh the worst was still to come, unfortunately! :angry: 

Link to post
Share on other sites
penolva

Your stress levels must have been sky high. You must be very kind if you gave him more chances after De Hoop. After the ferry fiasco it would have been a goodbye from me! 

Link to post
Share on other sites
Towlersonsafari

I do love a dung beetle @kittykat23uk do you think they were a male and female as some species stay together " during the rolling process"  when we saw them in the kruger our San Parks guide suggested that was what was happening-although I have no idea how one tells a Mr D. Beetle from a Mrs D Beetle!

i do hope you saw lots of rare mammals during your trip to make up for the annoying guide!

Link to post
Share on other sites
kittykat23uk
1 hour ago, penolva said:

Your stress levels must have been sky high. You must be very kind if you gave him more chances after De Hoop. After the ferry fiasco it would have been a goodbye from me! 

We had no choice in the matter. We would have been left without a guide. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Safaritalk uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. By using Safaritalk you agree to our use of cookies. If you wish to refuse the setting of cookies you can change settings on your browser to clear and block cookies. However, by doing so, Safaritalk may not work properly and you may not be able to access all areas. If you are happy to accept cookies and haven't adjusted browser settings to refuse cookies, Safaritalk will issue cookies when you log on to our site. Please also take a moment to read the Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy: Terms of Use l Privacy Policy