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Peter's third attempt


PeterHG
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71 / Nam 53. African Harrier-Hawk. Febr. Kunene River Lodge. Came sailing by late afternoon. Beautiful bird-of-prey!

 

 

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I knew it would not be long before the Rufous-tailed Palm Thrush showed up in your growing collection.

I take @Geoff's point about man made structures but to rule out wires would kill a lot of bird photos. How would we show Barn Swallows and Barn Owls without Barns??;)

 

One change of species for you. 69/51 is a Swamp Boubou not Southern.

Still a great collection and a good showcase for Kunene River Lodge. Even the "Red necked Spurfowl" is different up there.

Edited by Galana
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Thanks @Galana. You're absolutely right (as usual) about the Boubou. I have it labelled as Swamp Boubou in my bird journal, so why I typed Southern, I have no idea. Age probably ;). I'll edit the post .Yes I was hoping for the Rufous-tailed Palm-Thrush after reading your posts from the Kunene River Lodge and I'm happy we saw it.

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10 hours ago, Galana said:

How would we show Barn Swallows and Barn Owls without Barns??;)

 

In flight. :)    Yes, admittedly there are some species that now utilise man made objects for perches (and roost sites) but they still can be found perched on (in) all sorts of vegetation. I've seen a few Barn owls in Zambia but I've never seen a barn there.

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Peter Connan

For me, one of the amazing things about birds is how well a lot of species have adapted to city life and man-made structures. I don't mind drawing attention to that once in a while.

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72 / Nam 54. Brown-throated Martin. February, Kunene River Lodge. To keep the discussion going: this is one example where the man-made object is far too prominent and the end result  definitely does not justice to the bird. I am going to count it anyway....:P

 

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It is a bird thread, not a photography thread, and the photo shows the bird well, so no reason at all not to post.

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9 hours ago, PeterHG said:

I am going to count it anyway....:P

Why not? but perhaps as Rock Martin though?? Sorry to seem to be always picking you up!:o

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2 hours ago, Galana said:

Why not? but perhaps as Rock Martin though?? Sorry to seem to be always picking you up!:o

You may well be right again, but when I saw it flying it appeared to have a slightly forked tail, so I ruled out the Rock Martin. But looking at the whitish throat, I agree it’s not much like a brown-throated bird. Thanks again, @Galana

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73 / Nam 55. Grey-backed Camaroptera. Feb. Kunene River Lodge.

 

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74 / Nam 56. African Palm Swift. Feb. Kunene River Lodge. Taken from the beautiful terrace, overlooking Kunene River. Our favourite spot for dinner...

 

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75 / Nam 57. Ashy Flycatcher. Feb. Kunene River Lodge.

 

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76. Nam 58. African Golden Oriole. Feb. Kunene River Lodge. Similar to the European Oriole, but a longer eyestripe and yellow instead of black wing coverts. Just as hard to see properly and take a photograph of. First time I saw it.

 

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You are certainly having fun at Kunene. I want to go back too.

That is a lovely shot of the Cameroptera. One of the 'cleanest' I have seen.

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The Ashy Flycatcher is lovely.

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Dave Williams

Great collection of images Peter.

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77 / Nam 59. Yellow-bellied Greenbul. Feb, Kunene River Lodge. 

 

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Edited by PeterHG
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78 / Nam 60. Woodland Kingfisher. Feb. Kunene River Lodge. Their call could be heard many times, but taking a decent photo was quite another matter. i-VtwzVR9-L.jpg

 

 

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79 / Nam 61. African Red-eyed Bulbul. Feb. Kunene River Lodge.

 

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80 / Nam 62. Monteiro's Hornbill. Feb. Kamanjab.  On our way to Etosha we stopped over in Kamanjab. I'd briefly seen this Hornbill before on the trip, but not managed a photo so far. A lifer.

 

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Always great to get a lifer @PeterHG

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On 05/03/2018 at 3:24 AM, Peter Connan said:

For me, one of the amazing things about birds is how well a lot of species have adapted to city life and man-made structures. I don't mind drawing attention to that once in a while.

 

Ha, I've had a pair or Speckled Pigeons nesting on the canopy of my bakkie for the past 5 years. The canopy is hanging in the garage - lucky for the pigeons or they wouldn't raise many young.

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Peter Connan

Jip, I have Speckled Pigeons in the eaves.

 

But do you think I can get a decent picture of them?

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81 / Nam 63. Little Bee-eater. Feb Kunene. We saw 6 species of Bee-eater. All of them equally beautiful.

 

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82 / Nam 64. African Darter. Feb. Kunene. 

 

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