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Peter's third attempt


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PeterHG

108 / Nam 90. Chat Flycatcher. Feb. Etosha. Probably quite common, but my eye tends to avoid brownish birds without any distinct features....

 

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155 / Nam 137. Pel's Fishing Owl. Feb. Drotsky's Cabins, Botswana. If I had to name one highlight of our trip (there were many..) it would be finding the Pel's Fishing Owl. It took some effort, severa

108 / Nam 90. Gabar Goshawk. Feb. Etosha  

This one was already in the count, but I came across this beautiful juvenile Pale Chanting Goshawk, which was so cooperative.  

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PeterHG

i-W7cVG4V-X2.jpgThis one was already in the count, but I came across this beautiful juvenile Pale Chanting Goshawk, which was so cooperative.

 

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PeterHG

108 / Nam 90. Gabar Goshawk. Feb. Etosha

 

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PeterHG

109 /Nam 91. Purple Roller. Feb. Etosha

 

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michael-ibk

All wonderful photos, Peter - especially love the Roller and the young Goshawk, brilliant stuff.

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TonyQ

That Gabardine Goshawk is stunning!

 

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PeterHG

110 / Nam 92. Red-crested Korhaan Feb. Etosha

 

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PeterHG

111 /Nam 93. Shaft-tailed Whydah. Feb. Etosha. Always a challenge to fit the whole bird into one photo.

 

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PeterHG

112 /Nam 94. Red-backed Shrike. Feb. Etosha. We didn't see many and mostly pretty far off.

 

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PeterHG

113 /Nam 95. Green Sandpiper. Feb. Etosha. This is the only one we came across.

 

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Tdgraves

@PeterHG i fear that your green is in fact a wood sandpiper....

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Peter Connan

Congratulations on exceeding the 100 in exceptional style Peter!

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Galana
3 hours ago, Tdgraves said:

@PeterHG i fear that your green is in fact a wood sandpiper....

My pocket money is on it being a Marsh Sandpiper. Altogether a daintier bird.

A great collection building nicely.

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PeterHG

Thanks for the comments and suggestions @Tdgraves, @Peter Connan, @Galana. I’ll have another look, but I’ll stick with the Green for now ( supercilium, broader tailbars)

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Galana

That is your right but do take a look at the distribution chart too.

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PeterHG

Ah you’re right there, of course, @Galana. That makes a Green Sandpiper rather unlikely. Thanks I’ll look into it when I have access to my computer again

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PeterHG

I don't have any other photos of the same bird, but I think I'll go with you then @Tdgraves. Wood Sandpiper. I have looked at Marsh Sandpiper photos I've got in my collection, but there the bill is notably longer and even narrower. Thanks again for thinking with me on this one. Appreciate it!

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Dave Williams

The bill is very fine on Marsh Sandpiper. With a bit of luck you'll see Wood,Marsh and Green in TG!  

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PeterHG

I've changed #113 into Wood Sandpiper in my spreadsheet. I'll try and find a Green Sandpiper later in the year, perhaps in TG, together with the Marsh then...

 

114 /Nam 96. Grey Go-away-Bird. Feb. Etosha. Very conspicuous in Halali Camp

 

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PeterHG

115 / Nam 97. Amur Falcon. Feb Etosha. In flight the difference between Amur and Red-footed Falcon is obvious. When perched they are very much alike. The grey on the cheeks led me to think this is an Amur Falcon, but I'd be happy to hear about a different view. They both occur in Etosha.

 

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PeterHG

116 /Nam 98. Cardinal Woodpecker. Feb. Etosha

 

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PeterHG

117 / Nam 99. Red-necked Falcon. Feb. Etosha. One of the most beautiful falcons of Africa in my view. This adult bird was plucking away at its prey, while the juvenile was waiting patiently on the other side of the tree. We stayed with them for some twenty minutes and the falcons did not seem to mind at all. neither did we.

 

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PeterHG

118 / Nam 100. Woolly-necked Stork. Feb. Etosha

 

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Galana
32 minutes ago, PeterHG said:

led me to think this is an Amur Falcon

That is too close to call. This bird looks to be in transition from juv to adult plumage.

Distribution for Red-footed is closer and stacks the odds for that bird but the less than prominent eye ring pushes me to Amur.

 

Love the Red-necked Falcon. One of my favorites too. Did you ID the prey and count it too?:lol:

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Peter Connan

Congratulations on reaching the 100 in Namibia. Astonishingly good shots of the Red-neck and the Go-away.

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