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Michael´s Third Year


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michael-ibk

442/C135.) Tawny-Winged Woodcreeper (Dendrocincla anabatina) / Lohschwingen-Baumsteiger

 

Esquipulas, 3/8. Only occurring in Central America. I first thought it is a Woodpecker, thought of female Smoky-Brown, but the rufous tail clearly says it is not.

 

large.1171644584_CR_3582_Tawny-WingedWoo

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46/CH4.) Red-Throated Bee-Eater (Merops bulocki) / Rotkehlspint   One of the most spectacular birds in the park, high on my target list. Fortunately they were common and quite approachable.

21/E21.) Dalmatian Pelican (Pelecanus crispus) / Krauskopfpelikan   Lake Kerkini, Northern Greece, 17/3/2018. This is a great birding destination just an hour´s drive North from Thessaloniki

28/E28.) Greylag Goose (Anser anser) / Graugans   Chiemsee, 24/3/2018. Probably the most common Goose in Middle Europe. Don´t know how popular "The Wonderful Adventures of Nils Holgersson" b

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michael-ibk

443/C136.) Cocoa Woodcreeper (Xiphorhynchus susurrans) / Kleiner Fahlkehl-Baumsteiger

 

Bosque del Cabo, 31/7. Not really white streaks and the strong, bicoloured bill are the fieldmarks to look at here. Common on the Pacific side.

 

large.1214756206_CR_2662_CocoaWoodcreepe

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444/C137.) Black-Striped Woodcreeper (Xiphorhynchus lachrymosus) / Schwarzrücken-Baumsteiger

 

Manzanillo, 21/7. Only one short glimpse of this relatively distinctive Woodcreeper. Note the bold scaling on the back.

 

large.1989364700_CR_1276_Black-StripedWo

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michael-ibk

445/C138.) Streak-Headed Woodcreeper (Lepidocolaptes souleyetii) / Lanzettstrichel-Baumsteiger

 

Arenal, 16/7. Common in the North and on the Carribean side. Stripes are a bit more whitish than the Cocoa´s, the streaks on the belly are more extensive than with other species, and the bill is not as strong.

 

large.899072593_CR_245_Streak-HeadedWood

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446/C139.) Spot-Crowned Woodcreeper (Lepidocolaptes affinis) / Perlkappen-Baumsteiger

 

San Gerardo, 26/7. Easy to ID because it is the only classic Woodcreeper living that high up.

 

large.230083918_CR_2037_Spot-CrownedWood

 

large.348184025_CR_2130_Spot-CrownedWood

 

I´m sure we saw more Woodcreeper species but simply did not recognize them as such. And one more from Bosque del Cabo - really not sure about this one (the photo quality does not make it easier), opinions?

 

large.1962093942_CR_3468_Unid.Woodcreepe

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447/C140.) Ruddy Treerunner (Margarornis rubiginosus) / Rostbrust-Stachelschwanz

 

San Gerardo, 26/7. A cute little bird seen only once.

 

large.95838726_CR_2070_RuddyTreerunner_(

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michael-ibk

448/C141.) Buffy Tuftedcheek (Pseudocolaptes lawrencii) / Fahlwangen-Astspäher

 

San Gerardo, 26/7. Another highland species, only one short distant sighting.

 

large.1872477978_CR_1878_BuffyTuftedchee

 

The last of the Woodcreepers. They were quite a lot of work, not only when taking the pictures but I also spent an awful amount of time sitting in front of the PC and scratching my head which species it could be.

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29 minutes ago, michael-ibk said:

And one more from Bosque del Cabo - really not sure about this one (the photo quality does not make it easier), opinions?

 If I would have to ID it, it would become a Tawny-winged Woodcreeper - Dendrocincla homochroa.

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michael-ibk

That was also my inclination but the bill does not look right for that one at all.

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Peter Connan

Beautiful woodpeckers!

Treecreepers look like a nightmare...

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4 hours ago, michael-ibk said:

That was also my inclination but the bill does not look right for that one at all.

 

One more try: Streak-breasted Treehunter.

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michael-ibk

Good try but that one is a highlands bird and does not occur on Osa.:P

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An exceptional selection of Toucans and Woodpeckers. I particularly like the Acorn Woodpecker and the Keel-billed Toucan.

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Alexander33

I’ve also broken my vow, as the Big Year can be so overwhelming!  However, I saw you were posting a lot, and figured it might be the first batch of your shots from Costa Rica. Brings back lots of good memories. 

 

And then there’s the Green Macaw, Baird’s Trogon, and Emerald Toucanet — and now all I can think of is how I need to get back there as soon as possible!

 

Great stuff — looking forward to more as well as the TR.  

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michael-ibk

@Alexander33

 

Thanks Peter, your reports were a huge factor for my desire to see Costa Rica. And more vows broken, good. If I can lure one more member into the Big Year I will change my nickname to "Oathshatterer" or something like that. ;)

 

On to a tricky group - Antbirds! A strictly forest-based family, and therefore not easy to see, let alone get a picture of them.

 

449/C142.) Barred Antshrike (Thamnophilus doilatus) / Bindenameisenwürger

 

Bogarin Trail (Arenal Trail), 17/7. The only sighthing of this cool bird I´d personally rename as "Zebra Antbird". Occurs over most of Central and tropical South America.

 

large.2129861953_CR_507_BarredAntshrike_

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450/C143.) Black-Hooded Antshrike (Thamnophilus bridgesi) / Kapuzenameisenwürger

 

Bosque del Cabo, 31/7. A CR/Panama endemic. The species has apparently disappeared from many areas of Panama as a result of deforestation, but remains reasonably common in neighboring Costa Rica.

 

The female allowed close approach:

 

large.1158980036_CR_3399_Black-HoodedAnt

 

The male only allowed a more typical Antbird photo:

 

large.1244416188_CR_3496_Black-HoodedAnt

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451/C144.) Black-Crowned Antshrike (Thamnophilus atrinucha) / Westlicher Tropfenameisenwürger

 

Cahuita NP, 22/7. Antbirds do not actually eat ants - but several of them habitually follow foraging army ants which flush out hidden arthropods that the birds consume. This is the male.

 

large.1499400938_CR_1062_Black-CrownedAn

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452/C145.) Chestnut-Backed Antbird (Myrmeciza exsul) / Braunrücken-Ameisenvogel

 

Bosque del Cabo, 31/7 & 1/8. Always foraging near the ground in the forest, so a tough bird to get. Wouldn´t have located it without BdC´s excellent local guide, Carlos IIRC.

 

large.1695398089_CR_2680_Chestnut-Backed

 

large.1917249008_CR_3365_Chestnut-Backed

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453/C146.) Plain Antvireo (Dysithamnus mentalis) / Olivgrauer Würgerling

 

Bosque del Cabo, 1/8. Needed some time to figure out the male, the drawings in the book are not really spot-on IMO. A widespread bird but with several disjunct populations. There are more than 18 subspecies, some of them looking very different, so it would not surprise me if this species got split up in the future.

 

Male:

 

large.2035349076_CR_3434_PlainAntvireo_(

 

Female (more distinctive with the tawny crown):

 

large.73058869_CR_3493_PlainAntvireo_(Ol

 

 

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454/C147.) Dot-Winged Antwren (Micorhopias quixensis) / Tropfenflügel-Ameisenfänger

 

Bosque del Cabo, 30/7. There are four very similiar Antbirds in CR, all overall black with a bit of white. The broad white tail tips are the crucial fieldmarks for this one.

 

large.425799526_CR_2534_Dot-WingedAntwre

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michael-ibk

Next group - and I have little hope of getting through all of them tonight. Tyrant Flycatchers are both the largest New World bird family (about 400 species) and the most diverse Costa Rica familiy with 82 species. Not the most exciting one though. Fear not, we did not get that many of them.

 

455/C148.) Yellow Tyrannulet (Ornithion brunneicapillus) / Zitronentyrann

 

Esquipulas, 3/8. Only seen once in the foothill forests close to Manuel Antonio. This tiny bird shows a particular fondness for bamboo.

 

large.1134064711_CR_3617_YellowTyrannule

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456/C149.) Mistletoe Tyrannulet (Zimmerius parvus) / Weißstreif-Kleintyrann

 

Turrialba area, 26/7. This used to be the Paltry Tyrannulet, but the two species were split based on a molecular phylogenetic study (whatever that is) in 2013.

 

large.1397590119_CR_1783_MistletoeTyrann

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457/C150.) Yellow-Crowned Tyrannulet (Tyrannulus elatus) / Gelbscheitel-Olivtyrann

 

Esquipulas, 3/8. Range and the combination of yellow belly, grey head and conspicous wingbars are the fieldmarks which lead me to this ID.

 

large.935081232_CR_3562_Yellow-CrownedTy

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458/C151.) Yellow-Bellied Elaenia (Elaenia flavogaster) / Gelbbauch-Olivtyrann

 

Arenal, 18/7. Very similar to the Lesser Elaenia but that bird does not occur in the Arenal area. Quite a common bird that feeds on insects but also berries.

 

large.CR_649.JPG.0f3d57714047fc7ea3df96f

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459/C152.) Mountain Elaenia (Elaenia frantzii) / Nordanden-Olivtyrann

 

Bosque del Tolomuco, 28/7. The only sighting of this species. I wondered why this bird family came to the unflattering "Tyrant" name, so here´s the answer: "The Swedish biologist Linnaeus, who invented the system of scientific names in use today, gave the species name tyrannus to the Eastern Kingbird in 1758. The name of the family Tyrannidae was based on that. The name tyrannus seems appropriate for kingbirds, which are fearless in chasing much larger birds from their nests." (See https://www.birdwatchingdaily.com/blog/2014/06/25/kenn-kaufman-explains-tyrant-flycatcher-family-got-name/)

 

large.806082830_CR_2333_MountainElaenia_

 

 

 

 

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