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Michael´s Third Year


michael-ibk

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Dave Williams

Storming along now Michael. Some excellent birds and photos.

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46/CH4.) Red-Throated Bee-Eater (Merops bulocki) / Rotkehlspint   One of the most spectacular birds in the park, high on my target list. Fortunately they were common and quite approachable.

21/E21.) Dalmatian Pelican (Pelecanus crispus) / Krauskopfpelikan   Lake Kerkini, Northern Greece, 17/3/2018. This is a great birding destination just an hour´s drive North from Thessaloniki

28/E28.) Greylag Goose (Anser anser) / Graugans   Chiemsee, 24/3/2018. Probably the most common Goose in Middle Europe. Don´t know how popular "The Wonderful Adventures of Nils Holgersson" b

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Geoff

Coming along nicely for a 'relaxed' year :D

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michael-ibk

111/CH71.) Blue-Naped Mousebird (Urocolius macrourus) / Blaunacken-Mausvogel

 

Just to prove I have been paying good attention in all the latest ebc-lections in the other threads. Make sure your targets fly far away, shoot them straight against the sun and never ever take the shot before the sun is high. Never fails.

 

I don´t know what people have done to Zakouma´s Mousebirds, something traumatic for sure. They are not exactly posers but normally not too hard to get a decent picture of. Here in Chad they were extremely shy, we saw them daily but as soon as they saw the car approach they were off. Far off.

 

BY71_Blue-Naped Mousebird.JPG

 

 

Edited by michael-ibk
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112/CH72.) Long-Tailed Nightjar (Caprimulgus climacurus) / Schleppennachtschwalbe

 

Another new one for me. Breeding in the Sahelian zone. I also have Plain Nightjar in my notes but no photos.

 

BY 72 Long-Tailed Nightjar_.JPG
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113/CH73.) Common Ostrich (Struthio camelus) / Strauß

 

Sometimes the bird found here in Chad is called the "Red-Necked Ostrich" but this really is the common species found all over Africa. The North-African Ostrich is the subspecies camelus camelus. As the largest subspecies it is the largest living bird. Now only surviving in fragmented little pockets of North Africa. Most birds we saw looked nothing different from the Ostriches one commonly finds on safari but this male was obviously pretty excited and reallly deserved the "Red Neck" moniker.

 

BY 73 Red-Necked Ostrich.JPG
Edited by michael-ibk
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114/CH74.) Greyish Eagle-Owl (Bubo cineracens) / Grauuhu

 

Zakouma was not exactly Owl paradise for us. This poor nightdrive shot of the only species seen the whole week is it. (Take note pupils - night drives! Excellent for ebcs!)

 

BY 75 Greyish Eagle-Owl.JPG
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115/CH75.) Yellow-Billed Oxpecker (Buphagus africanus) / Gelbschnabel-Madenhacker

 

They have free reign here, their Red-Billed cousins are not around. Seemed to really like Roan.

 

BY 74a Yellow-Billed Oxpecker.JPG

 

BY 74 Yellow-Billed Oxpecker.JPG
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116/CH76.) Great White Pelican (Pelecanus onocrotalus) / Rosapelikan

 

One of Zakouma´s star birds. Seeing them in big numbers was wonderful.

 

BY 76 Great White Pelican.JPG

 

BY 76 Great White Pelican a.JPG

 

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117/CH77.) Pink-Backed Pelican (Pelecanus rufescens) / Rötelpelikan

 

This youngster was hiding among his cousins but could not escape my BY eyes. Actually I was not quite sure about the ID of this one but the guys over at birdnet confirmed my Pink-Backed suspicion.

 

BY 76 Pink-Backed Pelican.JPG
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118/CH78.) Piacpiac (Ptilostomus afer) / Spitzschwanzelster

 

A member of the Crow family with closer relations to Magpies than proper Crows. Another mostly Sahelian specialty. The immatures really help identification, only they have the red bill. Seen only once.

 

BY 78 Piacpiac.JPG
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119/CH79.) Speckled Pigeon (Columbus guinea) / Guineataube

 

Only seen in N´Djamena, none in the park.

 

BY 79 Speckled Pigeon.JPG
Edited by michael-ibk
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120/CH80.) Egyptian Plover (Pluvianus aegypticus) / Krokodilwächter

 

High on my target list, and fortunately we had a decent sighting of this bird along the Salamat river. The German name means "Guardian of Crocodiles". Why? Wiki gives the answer: " The bird is sometimes referred to as the crocodile bird for its alleged symbiotic relationship with crocodiles. According to Herodotus, the crocodiles lie on the shore with their mouths open and a bird called "trochilus" flies into the crocodiles' mouths so as to feed on decaying meat lodged between the crocodiles' teeth. The identification of the trochilus with any particular plover is doubtful, as is the cleaning symbiosis itself; no known photographic evidence exists, and the written accounts are considered suspect by the biologist Thomas Howell."

 

BY 80 Egyptian Plover.JPG

 

Edited by michael-ibk
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Peter Connan

Very interesting, thank you!

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michael-ibk

121/CH81.) Collared Pratincole (Glareola pratincola) / Rotflügel-Brachschwalbe

 

A breeding bird in many Southern European counties. One or two of them turn up every year in Austria and cause quite a stir among birders. Only seen in Rigueik.

 

BY 81 Collared Pratincole.JPG
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122/CH82.) Tawny-Flanked Prinia (Prinia subflavia) / Rahmbrustprinie

 

The best-known Prinia, this bird has a huge range encompassing most of Africa South of the Sahara. One sighting in camp.

 

BY 82 Tawny-Flanked Prinia.JPG
Edited by michael-ibk
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123/CH83.) Red-Billed Quelea (Quelea quelea) / Blutschnabelweber

 

If you want to understand the term of "abundance" come to Zakouma and watch Quelea.

 

BY 84a Red-Billed Quelea.JPG

 

BY 83 Red-Billed Quelea.JPG
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124/CH84.) Rufous-Tailed Scrub-Robin (Cercotricha galactotes) / Heckensänger

 

Another Northern African bird which can also be found closer to home, Spain or Greece for example.

 

BY 85 Rufous-Tailed Scrub-Robin.JPG
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125/CH85.) Black Scrub-Robin (Cercotrichas podobe) / Rußheckensänger

 

A new one for me. Found across the Sahel and on the Arabian peninsula. Only one sighting.

 

BY 86 Black Scrub-Robin.JPG
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126/CH86.) Abyssinian Roller (Coracias abyssinicus) / Senegalracke

 

The Northern answer to the ultimate safaribird, the Lilac-Breasted Roller. Every bit as beautiful IMO.

 

BY 87 Abyssinian Roller.JPG
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127/CH87.) Spotted Redshank (Tringa erythropus) / Dunkler Wasserläufer

 

A small group was foraging in a waterhole close to camp all week.

 

BY 84 Spotted Redshank.JPG
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128/CH88.) Four-Banded Sandgrouse (Pterocles quadricinctus) / Buschflughuhn

 

Only one sighting of this bird.

 

BY 88 Four-Banded Sandgrouse.JPG
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129/CH89.) Marsh Sandpiper (Tringa stagnatilis) / Teichwasserläufer

 

One of the Palearctic waders we don´t really get to see in Middle Europe, they migrate more via the Eastern countries. A very white individuum.

 

BY 99 Marsh Sandpiper.JPG

 

 

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-/CH90.) Green Sandpiper (Tringa ochropus) / Waldwasserläufer

 

Already posted from Europe, so not included in the overall count.

 

BY 90 Green Sandpiper.JPG
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130/CH91.) Wood Sandpiper (Tringa glareola) / Bruchwasserläufer

 

Another familiar wader for European birders. We will meet this one again with a better photo when I finally find the time to tackle my clicks from home.

 

BY 91 Wood Sandpiper.JPG
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131/CH92.) Common Sandpiper (Actitis hypoleucos) / Flussuferläufer

 

Another well-known bird from home. Only seen a couple of times, and not very approachable.

 

BY 92 Common Sandpiper.JPG
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