Jump to content

Kit's Fledgling BY


Recommended Posts

Kitsafari

110: Common Myna, Changi Business Park, March 31

 

5ad991d9b9418_commonmyna.thumb.JPG.26f5edc43aa8c148c539e3bd8e88f7b5.JPG

 

But not all common mynas have been displaced. It's easy to mistake the two species, but the area around the eyes of the common myna looks bare and its body is more brownish while the javan myna's body is black. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 593
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • Kitsafari

    379

  • Galana

    46

  • Dave Williams

    26

  • TonyQ

    21

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Thank you to all the BY participants for the rousing encouragement and support to get me going on my first attempt at the BY.  I did wonder if I chose the wrong year to take part in as I have no

007 : Pacific swallow, Pasir Ris Park Feb 16     The only pictures I have of this swallow - they were too fast on the wings for me and I thought that sign was a good prop for the

003 Grey Heron Pasir Ris Park Feb 11     and adding this not too good a photo just to show the heron hoping to steal the otter's meal of a big fish - they were quite a distance aw

Posted Images

Kitsafari

111: Malaysian/Sunda Pied Fantail, Eastwood vicinity5ad996b29320d_malaysianpiedfantail.thumb.JPG.c13924e3b0dd68b54ac7500f3c356bf3.JPG

 

the reason for its namesake: 5ad996af2dd4e_malaysianpiedfantail(3).thumb.JPG.8a271b64ab523fb06a13179235e7acc4.JPG

 

I was stalking the baby oriole just outside my neighbour's backyard when this slippery black and white bird hopped around the tree. These were the only shots I have of it. I should stake out my neighbour's backyard more often as I've spied ashy tailorbirds in the lush mango tree as well! so anyone keen to stake out my neighbour's backyard too? :ph34r:

This is a common resident and a very fleeting hoppity bird

 

Edited by Kitsafari
Link to post
Share on other sites
TonyQ

The Glossy starling sequence is wonderful, and how exciting to watch Orioles in your garden. One of the joys of the Big Year is seein which birds visit people's gardens.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Kitsafari

@TonyQ short of being there in person, it is wonderful to go around the world to see each other's gardens and backyards. :) 

Link to post
Share on other sites
michael-ibk

How nice to have an Oriole familiy just in front of your window, fantastic!

Link to post
Share on other sites
lmSA84

Second me as someone really enjoying seeing what’s around everyone’s neighbourhood. That’s why it’s so good to @Kitsafari on board with different perspective

Link to post
Share on other sites
Kitsafari
21 hours ago, michael-ibk said:

How nice to have an Oriole familiy just in front of your window, fantastic!

 

It was! I just wished the other birds would also pose in that tree often too. LOL! 

Link to post
Share on other sites
Kitsafari
21 hours ago, lmSA84 said:

Second me as someone really enjoying seeing what’s around everyone’s neighbourhood. That’s why it’s so good to @Kitsafari on board with different perspective

 

Thank you. I hope it won't disappoint you too much when the list runs out soon. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
Kitsafari

112: Common Iora, Eastwood vicinity

 

Juv

5adb080245f90_commoniorafemale-3.thumb.JPG.30685a6f58775720c35321005d5cbfea.JPG

female with what looks like ants in her beak

5adb08047fd42_commoniorafemale-4.thumb.JPG.08a2b7a240544b7e86ba8457254f2771.JPG

male5adb09412b4f4_commonioramale7.thumb.JPG.76dcc2bf6e167b87054d052a31812091.JPG

 

for months we were greeted with a beautiful song every morning from a tree across the road. the melodic songs brightened the days. Thanks to ST's BY, I've found the songbird. The common iora lives up to its name; the native bird is found everywhere on the island, but taking photos of it is challenging! the ioras are a bright happy yellow with clear stripes on its wings. breeding males spot a black cap and back, while the females are less yellowish on the belly. they host cuckoos, apparently. I hope to see it one day. 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
Kitsafari

113: Plaintive Cuckoo, female, Eastwood vicinity

 

5adb0ba4c3bda_plaintivecuckoofemale2.thumb.JPG.415a15ad4a0bb5b54017d241dde26fe6.JPG

 

This was an accidental bird. I had been trying to take pictures of the green pigeons in the dark dense leaves of the tree, and thought this was one. I was very pleased to find it was a cuckoo, and I wondered if this female had been spying on the iora's nest? This is an uncommon resident breeder, and its calls earned it a Malay name of Burung Mati Anak which means the bird whose baby died. 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
Kitsafari

114: House Crow, Eastwood vicinity

 

5adb0d4a73a55_housecrow-2.thumb.JPG.2c30143fe5a21d5ccf1dc319c8e8fd5e.JPG

 

Living in a country which is entirely developed, you just can't avoid birds on human structures. and although crows can be seen everywhere, this was the only clear shot of the bird. They used to be very common until the government culled them heavily. I've also noticed they avoid areas where the koel is, which is sensible since the koel use the crow's nest to host their eggs. last year, I noticed 2 crows on a tree feeding on a small bird. I couldn't identify the victim though. 

 

Edited by Kitsafari
Link to post
Share on other sites
Kitsafari

115: Eurasian tree sparrow, Eastwood vicinity


5adb0f5487a31_eurasiantreesparrow.thumb.JPG.a2704cd06634106b01c165d575e7f631.JPG

5adb0f4dcfb5f_eurasiansparrowsmating.thumb.JPG.e1cfe08df273179b278eb5afac32f319.JPG

 

the native sparrow species in Singapore. there is another species introduced to singapore - the House sparrows but are not  as widepsread. the Eurasian tree sparrow are found everywhere, although there are concerns that the mynas are driving them out. i've included the picture of the male and female birds on the pots to show the difference in size. the male was pursuing the female to mate. 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
PeterHG

I agree with the others that it is so good you decided to join the BY thread! Lots of unfamiliar species and interesting info. Imagine an oriole to be the most common bird around!

Link to post
Share on other sites
Kitsafari
1 minute ago, PeterHG said:

I agree with the others that it is so good you decided to join the BY thread! Lots of unfamiliar species and interesting info. Imagine an oriole to be the most common bird around!

 

@PeterHG errr, is it not so in other countries??? I always assumed it was so. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
elefromoz

@Kitsafari, the common Iora is a little beauty and you got a couple of really nice shots of it, I'm really surprised at the variety you are getting 

Link to post
Share on other sites
Kitsafari
On 22/04/2018 at 6:49 PM, elefromoz said:

@Kitsafari, the common Iora is a little beauty and you got a couple of really nice shots of it, I'm really surprised at the variety you are getting 

 

So am I!

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
Dave Williams

You have clearly demonstrated that my day in Singapore last November could have been far more rewarding from a birding perspective but there again, not as much fun as drinking beer towers in Satay by the Bay!

Link to post
Share on other sites
Kitsafari

@Dave Williams you are one up over me. I have yet to set foot in the satay by the bay. But I'm now more confident of bringing any of you gals and guys around to the parks for some birdlife if you ever drop by this part of the world (again, as in your case, the beer tower will be a just reward for walking in the hot humid parks). 

Edited by Kitsafari
Link to post
Share on other sites
Dave Williams

In actual fact just a few feet from where we were sitting a group of excited birders were photographing a Common Kingfisher, a rarity and migrant visitor I was told. I'd have much preferred a local one myself! We have been very impressed with Singapore both time we have had a stopover visit. I'd love to spend a lot more time checking out the nature reserves.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Soukous

coming along nicely @kitsafari, we'll have you hooked 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
Kitsafari

@Soukous I'm afraid I already am. :wacko:

 

Just yesterday, my OH was talking perhaps of getting the Tamron lens eventually, and I was talking of a DSLR. and just 3 years ago I didn't know what a DSLR was. I'm still unsure what it stands for too!

 

Edited by Kitsafari
Link to post
Share on other sites
Kitsafari
On 24/04/2018 at 6:18 PM, Dave Williams said:

In actual fact just a few feet from where we were sitting a group of excited birders were photographing a Common Kingfisher, a rarity and migrant visitor I was told. I'd have much preferred a local one myself! We have been very impressed with Singapore both time we have had a stopover visit. I'd love to spend a lot more time checking out the nature reserves.

 

It's interesting that you had raised this. and prob you'd regret it now that you've got me started. 

SIngapore was unfortunately a hub in trading of birds and acquiring and keeping birds was a huge hobby in the last few decades. some of these birds escaped and some were released. A Buddhism practice of releasing caged animals once a year as a show of kindness to animals ironically entailed buying a caged bird (among other animals) and releasing them. ALthough this practice has decreased over the years, the release of new birds introduced many new species to Singapore which started breeding and making their homes here. 

On top of all this, SIngapore is located near the equator and serves as a transit stop for many migrant birds flying between the north (China, Koreas, Taiwan, northern INdia) and the south (mainly australasia). 

so that has added up to nearly 400 species that are seen each year here. which means if I were a bird specialist like many of you here, I could have easily nailed at least 200 species at home by the end of this year.

just give me 10 more BY years. :)

 

Edited by Kitsafari
Link to post
Share on other sites
Soukous
11 minutes ago, Kitsafari said:

@Soukous I'm afraid I already am. :wacko:

 

Just yesterday, my OH was talking perhaps of getting the Tamron lens eventually, and I was talking of a DSLR. and just 3 years ago I didn't know what a DSLR was. I'm still unsure what it stands for too!

 

 

Digital Single Lens Reflex

basically the old 35mm film cameras used to be referred to as SLR (Single Lens Reflex)  so they just added the D in front when they went digital

Link to post
Share on other sites
Kitsafari

116: Red-breasted Parakeets, Eastwood vicinity (home garden)

 

Juv: 

5ae4405be4752_redbreastedparakeet(23)-2.thumb.JPG.b5563a1eb99dce105ab2c54895807306.JPG

 

Male: 

5ae44071b93bb_redbreastedparakeet.thumb.JPG.2e37e58632bf6e3f7a872459a90d9be2.JPG

 

female: 

5ae441870dcde_redbreastedH(2).thumb.JPG.40a0b4eebcab11d87ebe7e1707d53900.JPG

 

a treeful of parakeets in front of my house:

5ae440de16da5_redbreastedparakeets.thumb.JPG.1c0024c1f569e897066281d2d2aa4d6a.JPG

 

and a cacophony of the noisy birds: 

 

 

This is a non-native species but has been here since the 1940s. it's breeding very successfully and slowly pushing out the long-tailed parakeets, which are native to Singapore.The males have a bright beak while the females have a duller grey/black beak while the juvenile lacks the bright pink breast. this flock was enjoying the fruits of the Lagerstroemia speciosa  tree (also known as the Rose of India or Crepe Flower tree). at one point there were some 30-40 flitting between the tree in front of my home and the tree in front of my neighbour's. Sadly, the big sightings were cut short by the authorities who came and chopped off the tops (and the fruits) of the tree.

Edited by Kitsafari
Link to post
Share on other sites
Kitsafari

117: Rose-ringed Parakeet, Home vicinity

 

male:

5ae4486413cc2_roseringed(2).thumb.JPG.42bbafc962431048b2d152dbfa54da3b.JPG

 

female and juv: feeding junior

 

5ae44868d6c7a_rose-ringedparakeet(3).thumb.JPG.0ddf6eb25db03861f75d3ddf8379e5f3.JPG5ae4486cc9bae_rose-ringedparakeet(8).thumb.JPG.30755ed127c2b0993b1f25919e86566c.JPG5ae4486f43099_rose-ringedparakeet(9).thumb.JPG.38f279e3fdec35b6edb06900e4310f79.JPG5ae448714eb76_rose-ringedparakeet(13).thumb.JPG.cdf91a75e2b7a0ce08571d59797ffcf6.JPG

 

another non-native species but has been breeding a very long time in our country. it is an uncommon species here, compared with the red-breasted and less noisy too than the red-breasted parakeets. this species seem not to mind being close to the red-breasted as both species were on the same tree at the same time.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Safaritalk uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. By using Safaritalk you agree to our use of cookies. If you wish to refuse the setting of cookies you can change settings on your browser to clear and block cookies. However, by doing so, Safaritalk may not work properly and you may not be able to access all areas. If you are happy to accept cookies and haven't adjusted browser settings to refuse cookies, Safaritalk will issue cookies when you log on to our site. Please also take a moment to read the Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy: Terms of Use l Privacy Policy