Jump to content
Julian

South Luangwa (Tafika and Kaingo) and Lower Zambezi (Old Mondoro and Chiawa)- 15th July to 28th July 2018

Recommended Posts

TonyQ

Excellent photos, and what a leopard sighting. Very impressive.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Julian
4 hours ago, TonyQ said:

Excellent photos, and what a leopard sighting. Very impressive.

 

@TonyQ

Thank you, more leopards to come. Busy editing the Kaingo photos, hopefully start posting more early next week.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Caracal

Really enjoyed catching up with this TR - what wonderful sightings and great photos @Julian

 

Particularly drawn to those landscapes with the Luangwa and those stunning skies in #63

 

You seem to have acquired a knack of locating and photographing giraffes sitting - it's got me thinking. Don't think I've ever seen that - the ones I've seen have always been standing browsing or strolling.

 

Hope you get a chance to post more soon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Julian
5 hours ago, Caracal said:

Really enjoyed catching up with this TR - what wonderful sightings and great photos @Julian

 

Particularly drawn to those landscapes with the Luangwa and those stunning skies in #63

 

You seem to have acquired a knack of locating and photographing giraffes sitting - it's got me thinking. Don't think I've ever seen that - the ones I've seen have always been standing browsing or strolling.

 

Hope you get a chance to post more soon.

@Caracal

pleased you like the landscapes ( many more to see as I post this report.) The sitting giraffes are young ones. They seem to be very relaxed and it may be because there were no lions in the Tafika area while we were at the camp. 

I really must apologise to all who have been following this report for such a long gap since I finished the Tafika section. I did not anticipate the recent work on our house ( complete bathroom refit) would take up all my spare time, as I’m not doing the work - just overseeing the company doing it - so much disruption and mess to clear up on a daily basis, and so many questions/choices/etc. It’s finished now - so this afternoon I will be continuing to edit/ reduce the Kaingo photos and should be starting to post that section in a few days time.

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Julian

After several conversations on the radio with colleagues at Kaingo Lloyd found the precise transfer location on the river- our transfer was to be by canoe – which looked a bit precarious. We said our farewells to Lloyd and our belongings were placed in one canoe, with two more canoes for us. The canoes were narrow and not very stable, slightest movement from me and it wobbled, so I sat absolutely still, but we were soon across the other side on this shallow spot of the Luangwa where we were met by a couple of the staff including our new guide, Hendrix (easy name to remember- I just kept thinking Jimi).

 

We clambered up the steep bank with a bit of assistance and after being welcomed climbed into the safari vehicle and were driven to the camp just a few minutes away.  We were slightly relieved to be on firm ground again, and I did wonder how they would deal with the situation if a guest’s bag (with camera gear) ended up in the river............ but it was a new and interesting transfer experience for us.

 

After the orientation talk, which was given to us by Gerrard – a very pleasant manager- we were shown to our room. The rooms are stone built with thatched roofs and combine a bit of luxury and comfort but still with a very rustic feel.

 

IMG_0809.JPG.8002466ecf94cda6f0ef85692ce4d22f.JPGIMG_9071.JPG.df191e60647fab11211806ee119ec05d.JPGIMG_9072.JPG.16b870d4c614c6cd8b8ee258beae8a70.JPGIMG_9077.JPG.84debacd365a504f89b19b396eba537b.JPGIMG_0824.JPG.59007d583d2d145e67b06c5372147671.JPGIMG_9070.JPG.8a15101f7f36b7895c56f7b499380b4d.JPGIMG_9075.JPG.e0d4ee800b9d6041581ddf161876b33e.JPGIMG_0827.JPG.d8a11324a40b3d836c218b1f731c8cb2.JPG

 

 

There is an outdoor bath as well as a private viewing area with comfortable lounge seating on the edge of the river.

 

IMG_0811.JPG.eb889503691977e22834249e0fee1146.JPGIMG_9079.JPG.258ed49e56cffbd78d64705bc8f20b33.JPGIMG_9080.JPG.0af4be2fd747c54cb3477af44b80a6f5.JPG

 

The dining and bar building was also really nice, with the bar being made from one section of a very large tree.

 

IMG_9083.JPG.edb2030372fcb0f072051832107334d3.JPGIMG_9086.JPG.d5fefa9254f29f86e15598a6e8f2109f.JPGIMG_0820.JPG.7c49eacc14056b7d4792474ed556550a.JPGIMG_0814.JPG.a25b1c7a3b9df2abd134acd1b3f6b2e8.JPGIMG_0813.JPG.e0693e286ba39a01e9b746f072a62f63.JPGIMG_0818.JPG.741a6d2b8ba8929ab2376c4f9cdefbbf.JPG

 

 

Gerrard, Eve and Agata turned out to be great hosts, and we met Derek Shenton, the owner, on our second day there.  The wake-up call is made by drumming, with breakfast around the camp fire area, and the drums were also used to announce when brunch and dinner were ready. The food turned out to be very good and the communal meals provided a chance to share stories with the other guests, guides and managers.

 

IMG_9082.JPG.58c62bbfed09cbfa0d0572da5f09ef9b.JPG

 

 

Another aspect that was different at this camp was that you returned from your morning drive about 10.30am with brunch served at about 11.00am. After lunch you then had the opportunity to do an additional activity if you wished – going to one of the hides or going on a walking safari. This was followed by afternoon tea on a covered decked area on the river’s edge, prior to the afternoon/evening game drive.

 

IMG_9087.JPG.5a6462708a5a6aed538240a9039a4224.JPGIMG_9089.JPG.2d18ec1748cadb3c6c3da5b306f17e95.JPG

 

 

Hendrix turned out to be an excellent guide (although we felt on occasions he  got too close to wildlife – especially leopards, and on reflection after we left the camp we realised he had put us into a couple of possibly dangerous situations). We had the vehicle to ourselves for the whole of our three days stay, which was pure luck, as the camp occupancy was unusually low just during our stay, normally being full throughout the summer period. We were hoping the weather would turn warmer but it remained unusually cool for the time of year.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Julian

 

After brunch we sorted out our belongings, had a look round the camp, then chilled out for a while before it was time for afternoon tea. At about 4.00pm we set off on our first Kaingo game drive. Within a couple of minutes we spotted a few crocodiles on the riverbank.

 

IMG_0336.JPG.9731982db226c22f543831b98408f9cb.JPG

 

It quickly became very overcast and the skies looked very dark but then we saw a group of something in the distance. As we approached the familiar colouration of black, white and brown could only be one possibility – it was a group of nine painted wolves.  (I noticed in the recent BBC Dynasties program they constantly referred to them as painted wolves and I feel this not only differentiates them from just being a wild dog, ie like a feral dog, but it is also a more fitting name for such  a superb and unique species).

 

IMG_5939.JPG.496b3edfb25fab090109d04a0ab3dd8f.JPGIMG_0341.JPG.a73dbdb30556ba6473d6628ddf049aed.JPGIMG_0344.JPG.fdcc8776b0a8ec2427986b1f9ffcd467.JPGIMG_0345.JPG.c89712de206b964d5900753fb0a6ab23.JPGIMG_0348.JPG.4798f2d07b64e9c7fe05f92d7bb560ca.JPGIMG_0354.JPG.92a5b20a60a49d0292aa720ac4021dce.JPGIMG_0359.JPG.0c4dedfbf1897a36f2dd2b3a8e580d5f.JPGIMG_0361.JPG.0bd24df6509f126917ec82b9d7cfc2aa.JPGIMG_0362.JPG.21742e6e0d7353485f7e10731873f6a9.JPGIMG_0366.JPG.2bd9f5438b3760e6145310bcb24ee4ca.JPGIMG_0369.JPG.5989373053920b7a8a32a97f94162474.JPG

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Julian

 

This was only our second ever sighting of painted wolves in our six African safaris so we were really excited to see them. They were all sleeping or resting so, after Hendrix had explained that the pack consisted of three older adults with the other six being only about a year old as they were last year’s offspring, we decided we would move on and return a little later. However an impala not far off called and the six younger ones began to stand up and become very alert.

 

IMG_5945.JPG.57eb697642780c43f43f7c80bc37a600.JPGIMG_5943.JPG.e28f731baa679d47efdb7b3741885998.JPGIMG_5944.JPG.4c9f1608499a9049ddd67de0db62eaf9.JPGIMG_5949.JPG.752bda3fc5c981553ea1815a636b2377.JPGIMG_5956.JPG.fd33ce961ca8f5b56e9d6f78e25e390b.JPGIMG_5951.JPG.90354d05cf94854d9f3a385981c568d7.JPGIMG_0370.JPG.aa3bec023b07986d70fdd4a903d4c3d3.JPGIMG_0371.JPG.eabef9bb094a677990fecc43b22176a1.JPGIMG_0373.JPG.5f03e236707ad63b9dd1bda873eba13e.JPGIMG_0377.JPG.f4f68ac238b5035099416416464fd134.JPGIMG_0378.JPG.b638f0160ab7567f152c81f19c07661a.JPGIMG_0383.JPG.13f0fa1363cf988aa17cabbfadd4e3a2.JPGIMG_5959.JPG.3fe5722d073eedca426eaecd8c3f7c0b.JPG

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Julian

That was followed by a bit of playful bonding which was great to watch.

 

IMG_5967.JPG.988c040c7eaa25221bc3b6517c1b72d8.JPGIMG_5975.JPG.a3c8b3ae838fcff6b15e54361fec1a98.JPGIMG_5976.JPG.831d0ac3b91dd64c22b9bd437f858d0e.JPGIMG_0405.JPG.5dffc5dd2946d813821edadeb8a52941.JPGIMG_0411.JPG.fa973de9e7a212ebdf63a8a3358e8779.JPG

 

IMG_5981.JPG.e77a7502938b0b7ac7a06edcb720f936.JPGIMG_5984.JPG.54d278669022ffc9328a46a8759a6949.JPGIMG_5985.JPG.576d4165c187dd1938b7b711bb304426.JPG

 

After a further few minutes the older adults lead the pack off into the bush. Hendrix suggested we drive off along the track as we should meet up with them again. Seven of them appeared and started trotting along the track. The other two had been attempting to catch a buffalo – which was obviously way too big for them. We heard the buffalo snorting and then the other two came out and joined up with the rest.

 

IMG_5987.JPG.feac0162e3a460ef723001e0a44fdaf2.JPGIMG_5990.JPG.2d40f8035f639ea40d9fb25e5b36ff12.JPGIMG_0422.JPG.45e8092818bb55b3fd20ced7a472f2df.JPG

 

They soon stopped and were looking around to see which direction they would go. Seconds later they turned off the track and set off at a pace across, what I can only describe as, looks like a huge ploughed field. Those of you who have been to South Luangwa will know that this type of ground is almost impossible to drive a vehicle across (as we found out another evening while trying to follow a leopard). Seeing these painted wolves was a great sighting for us, especially on our first game drive at Kaingo.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Julian

Minutes later a patch of bright sunlight appeared in the darkened overcast skies creating an unusual and very appealing light. We briefly watched and photographed the scenery containing some impala and kudu.

 

IMG_5994.JPG.44f5c1b87ab1272efe8072e264e3125c.JPGIMG_5995.JPG.0a87ebfabf97b3583df07451e10bcfa3.JPGIMG_5991.JPG.8d084f9b5497124603e83fea02aa2f6e.JPGIMG_5996.JPG.aa4c095c7f84fb32d86c178e26e88b12.JPGIMG_0429.JPG.1ff09f2426ecd051cc99f952e88b0ba1.JPGIMG_0444.JPG.901fb0bf6efaa350e5f2d6b4020b24c4.JPG

 

Next we found a male lion in some bushes eating an impala (no photos as the bushes were obscuring the lion almost completely.) However the kill belonged to a leopard which was sitting only a few yards away from the lion, quite at ease, on the other side of the bushes. Hendrix explained that this leopard had killed four impala in the last two days, and as she was relaxed and appeared well fed, she must have managed to keep enough of the kills she made.

 

IMG_0451.JPG.98fe7968a995523cc290df1c1fd1eddf.JPG

 

Sunset was approaching and we met up for sundowners with the rest of the Kaingo guests and also the guests from the sister-camp Mwamba.

 

IMG_0453.JPG.9657cc1c0ca6ea92b67474e6ea74794a.JPGIMG_0456.JPG.1a721ad3f835837cd0e86aa68633c4fe.JPGIMG_6006.JPG.93a07ef35ca79c7d5aac8db0d2fbe71f.JPG

 

After the sundowners we continued in the darkness for a further hour and a half which turned out to be productive as we found two more leopards, one female (no photos) and then a large male who seemed very relaxed with our presence.

 

IMG_0463.JPG.66c9ba4e01c1aeb12a832d5e478ae074.JPGIMG_0462.JPG.39a352fbf8bd69006d2710fa064a9f00.JPG

 

Back at camp we talked with the other guests and staff over an excellent evening meal. A great start to our stay at Kaingo.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
amybatt

Lovely start to your Kaingo portion of the safari.  Had you been expecting painted wolves at all, or was it a complete surprise?  I'm not sure how commonly spotted they are in S. Luangwa.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
michael-ibk

A lot of white on some of these Dogs, beautiful specimens.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Julian
3 hours ago, amybatt said:

Lovely start to your Kaingo portion of the safari.  Had you been expecting painted wolves at all, or was it a complete surprise?  I'm not sure how commonly spotted they are in S. Luangwa.

@amybatt

Hi, There are a few packs in the park and we would have been disappointed if we did not see any at either Tafika or a Kaingo, as the northern sector is the best for wildlife, given that the central sector is very busy with vehicles from camps located just outside the main ( only) entrance to th3 Park. We missed a pack of 16 at at Tafika by one day and did see another pack at very long distance across the othe side of the river ( on the Tafika side) while at Kaingo.

They are also present in Lower Zambezi but seen less often. However Lower Zambezi is stunningly beautiful, very few visitors, very few camps ( which are superb) , as you will see when I complete the report, and the wildlife sightings there can b3 just as good as in South Luangwa. I would love to go back to both parks without hesitation , and they are both wonderful destinations.

 

 

 

go back to booth parks without hesitation

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Julian
52 minutes ago, michael-ibk said:

A lot of white on some of these Dogs, beautiful specimens.

@michael-ibk

Thanks, I felt the same, beautifully marked. Our only previous sighting was in Botswana, back in. 2009 at Duma Tau ( I will do a trip report of that safari - hopefully after I finish this one), where there were five of them just resting, so this was a far better experience for us.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
offshorebirder

Thanks for the camp details about Kaingo @Julian.

 

Is the 10:30am return to camp “hard wired” or can one stay out later if one wishes?

 

I will follow the TR closely for the potentially dangerous situations your guide put you in!

 

The drumming for wake up calls and summons to meals, etc. sounds like a case of man-made noise pollution.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Julian
1 hour ago, offshorebirder said:

Thanks for the camp details about Kaingo @Julian.

 

Is the 10:30am return to camp “hard wired” or can one stay out later if one wishes?

 

I will follow the TR closely for the potentially dangerous situations your guide put you in!

 

The drumming for wake up calls and summons to meals, etc. sounds like a case of man-made noise pollution.

@offshorebirder

Not sure if you could stay out later, but they seemed to be fairly laid back about things. I think there were two reasons for the timing, apart from coordination of preparing brunch when the camp was full. First of all it gave you time for a break but still able to fit in another activity before the afternoon/ evening game drive, ie going to a hide or on a walk. Secondly, later in the season - Mid August to November it is far too hot to make it worthwhile staying out later than mid morning.  

We didn’t feel we missed anything by these timings and even though we were out longer at Tafika- both in the morning and the evening - we actually saw more wildlife at Kaingo.

 

The potentially dangerous situations were not something that we realised at the time, but only a few days later when we thought about it - so I don’t want to make an issue of this but I would be interested in others opinions.

 

We found the drumming was a pleasant addition to our experience- as seems to be the case  with all other comments we have read from other guests at the camp. The sound of drumming in the African bush feels right.

 

 

Edited by Julian

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
CDL111

What a start to your stay Kaingo, to see dogs so soon and such excellent photographs. Then followed shortly afterwards with leopards.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Julian
1 hour ago, CDL111 said:

What a start to your stay Kaingo, to see dogs so soon and such excellent photographs. Then followed shortly afterwards with leopards.

@CDL111

Thanks, plenty more wildlife photos to come for the rest of our Kaingo stay.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Julian

2nd Day at Kaingo

 

IMG_9062.JPG.f1ecb3a7dc600bc51b6bddb7abd249a7.JPGIMG_9064.JPG.809b7517048e9ee60b34b50eb76e916d.JPGIMG_9065.JPG.02124dc177c20c03df836f412c99aa58.JPGIMG_9066.JPG.f2603a9e2f381471ba7485e17621e949.JPG

 

It was a cold and breezy start to the day with largely cloudy skies, so not surprisingly for the first hour or so there was hardly any wildlife to be seen. However Hendrix then found some lion tracks and we set off in the direction the tracks were pointing. After a while, a long way off the track on a very large expanse of open ground, Hendrix spotted some lions in the distance.

 

We drove closer and it was a large pride of 15 lions consisting of females and adolescent males, most of which were sound asleep and looking well fed. However a couple of them had spotted a zebra in the distance and began to take an interest, but their enthusiasm was short lived as the zebra was slowly moving even further away.

 

IMG_6038.JPG.4b0849c2607df329f813c4842baa5eae.JPGIMG_6048.JPG.ba98903d665773a9c373154c5fca371f.JPGIMG_0500.JPG.638beaa188924b1a7de103721cfcb119.JPGIMG_0531.JPG.af3c8c5731eed41d2383fe9a2382ad9b.JPG

 

IMG_0533.JPG.14fe34df18583fa375927d490e6294d6.JPGIMG_0540.JPG.ca9011f6a8dd8978b9b07653f3633899.JPGIMG_6014.JPG.5de18fafa3770dfe71653aa464e39b3a.JPGIMG_6016.JPG.74a167a3eee7ffcd89c32754b24c1bbe.JPGIMG_6030.JPG.c16d3cd1af60f0ced68a8740a58461a2.JPGIMG_6028.JPG.4730e96813d3a2aefcb805300f435719.JPGIMG_6034.JPG.7508b16e2ad6b54ff14f531b330850a9.JPGIMG_6035.JPG.9df256930d44b3ddf848347857819bab.JPGIMG_6049.JPG.09ab044e605b26797b1ee1354c014639.JPG

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Julian

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Julian

IMG_6021.JPG.8226aff1ffc0e2358585e4cbb2f3c3f0.JPGIMG_6032.JPG.148ba33d59d069923204d7d080c189ac.JPGIMG_6033.JPG.402ef6992746ef2cda3b21143360202b.JPG

 

 

A while later we were passing the location where we saw the lion yesterday feeding on an impala, so we stopped to have a look  and the lion was still there  now feeding on the next impala that the leopard had killed.

 

IMG_0545.JPG.b261d42baa0b3a80a1c082d28cb10c67.JPG

 

IMG_0554.JPG.7ebd59ca075d9dbcebbced9a4ca91c70.JPG

 

[youtube]

[/youtube]

 

 

As we watched the lion feeding we noticed there was a marsh mongoose right next to the kill and only a few feet away from the lion, calmly taking tiny pieces of meat.

 

IMG_0556.JPG.2addffc0fcae738fe3b44a302f250685.JPGIMG_0557.JPG.8d0e4285ddda7967245b6dd15f71de98.JPG

 

 

Even more surprisingly the leopard was still just a few yards away , relaxed and apparently still unconcerned.

 

IMG_0565.JPG.84c75a8d3f5326812eb72abdbaba0e0f.JPGIMG_0566.JPG.01ad168da28735ed6927d4ed02f98160.JPGIMG_0567.JPG.e70625a6ac58dbd46e0e6809aeabfce0.JPGIMG_0568.JPG.104c277a9db132bb9b9c68243dc9deb0.JPGIMG_0572.JPG.318641a8ce0ba769497751e1d9fc9b97.JPGIMG_0577.JPG.7216c04089fe12dcfe77e04e7e9a8420.JPG

 

 

The weather remained cold and on our drive back to camp the only wildlife we came across was an elephant and a few vervet monkeys.  

IMG_0586.JPG.fac42d19f4f65ac2ca68657396a16870.JPGIMG_0584.JPG.0c51585dd4504e35f07c3abf5ded5825.JPGIMG_0585.JPG.6c3b0b4d6701eac4293753fbdb2afd37.JPGIMG_6072.JPG.3e687909d045712651fc409daf9f6265.JPGIMG_6074.JPG.3316e4c61d3adeb29baed7a6d8693e5b.JPGIMG_6075.JPG.c26a038162993c82fe43e68f8fba31e9.JPG

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
lmonmm

Since I can't "like"- you are stuck with the verbal  equivalent :)   So glad to see this TR moving along as this is an area I am very interested in visiting. Kaingo looks very inviting and so far the wildlife has been accommodating. Curious- that looked like a young elephant to be out on it's own- were there no others near by?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Julian
9 hours ago, lmonmm said:

Since I can't "like"- you are stuck with the verbal  equivalent :)   So glad to see this TR moving along as this is an area I am very interested in visiting. Kaingo looks very inviting and so far the wildlife has been accommodating. Curious- that looked like a young elephant to be out on it's own- were there no others near by?

@lmonmm

Thanks, if I remember correctly the mother was in the bushes very nearby.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
CDL111

Many years ago, we saw a leopard having lost a kill to a hyena and patiently waiting for the opportunity to take it back and he did. Hopefully the leopard was able to take it's kill from the lioness.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Julian
1 hour ago, CDL111 said:

Many years ago, we saw a leopard having lost a kill to a hyena and patiently waiting for the opportunity to take it back and he did. Hopefully the leopard was able to take it's kill from the lioness.

@CDL111

I dont think the leopard was too bothered - it still appeared to be very full, and as it had killed 4 impala in two days losing half of its catch probably did not matter - I assume the meat would be rather rotten by the time one leopard could eat four impala. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Julian

After brunch and a couple of hours break we went to the hippo hide. Only a five minutes drive from the camp but we did see a kudu and a fish eagle on the way.

 

IMG_0594.JPG.27f9fe09d004701c420c124ebd042cc9.JPGIMG_0595.JPG.6bf8dd1e1fcc3dda41651eb2c7f7522a.JPGIMG_0598.JPG.00274edf2000e38fe019dfea6e29772f.JPG

 

The hippo hide was in a superb location giving us excellent views of the hippos resting on the bank by the river’s edge. Some of them decided to get up and go into the river including a mother with her baby.

 

IMG_6083.JPG.169d9797cce95731b7e7f04e3429da35.JPGIMG_6080.JPG.f74afb75800582447c943c8e389cfd9d.JPGIMG_0602.JPG.73cb2d36395482d1f998e15dbf71b99a.JPGIMG_0608.JPG.03beabb483a4de76b7a27592057e26c1.JPGIMG_0610.JPG.b0878ab85c344a67238b53e98a90c46a.JPGIMG_6085.JPG.54c98266e04b8a8af700508e0fdb90f5.JPGIMG_0618.JPG.3af536eceeba60e8d10e14f12b606eb3.JPGIMG_6089.JPG.875d99a22fea6a8c78e1333e117423f4.JPGIMG_6091.JPG.bcf855886760ef844c05a72041aa52a5.JPGIMG_0623.JPG.f59b62daedd11b19f6c68500184a0c38.JPGIMG_6093.JPG.723e1737b3f2f6ee3532e997bd02394b.JPGIMG_6094.JPG.79a1e943bd90b629b55040aa3f316266.JPGIMG_6098.JPG.c17b76cbf50baaa27a139c9c7130b44b.JPGIMG_0635.JPG.b097557cf237a6fbd778331d085f6f67.JPG

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Safaritalk uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. By using Safaritalk you agree to our use of cookies. If you wish to refuse the setting of cookies you can change settings on your browser to clear and block cookies. However, by doing so, Safaritalk may not work properly and you may not be able to access all areas. If you are happy to accept cookies and haven't adjusted browser settings to refuse cookies, Safaritalk will issue cookies when you log on to our site. Please also take a moment to read the Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy: Terms of Use l Privacy Policy