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Tom Kellie

~ @kittykat23uk

 

I'm moved by the above post.

 

The detailed information, presented with clarity and comprehensiveness, is very special.

 

Not to mention the generous assortment of photographs of Chrysocyon brachyurus.

 

In 1973 I was a student in Argentina. Someone told me about the maned wolf, having seen it near their estancia in northeastern Argentina, Corrientes Province.

 

Since then I've wondered about it, but until your post, never had any clear sense of the species.

 

When the university resumes next semester, I'll share this masterful post with interested life science students.

 

Many heartfelt thanks!

 

Tom K.

 

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13/09/2018 Baia Das Pedras   I got very little sleep the night I arrived primarily because I had a major freakout when I tried to charge my phone. The European adapter that I had brought wit

The sun started to set and a myriad of colours played out in the evening sky, getting more and more intense with each minute that passed.    20180918_170507 Sunset by Jo Dale, on Flic

We got back to Baia das Pedras (I will call it BdP from here on in as did @Atdahl in his report) and enjoyed our lunch. I won't go into describing BdP too much as Alan did a great job of it in his rep

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Great TR - and I’m very envious of brilliant collection of birds! 

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kittykat23uk

Thanks both. here's a couple of videos of the wolves;

 

 

 

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kittykat23uk

4 October 2018

 

We were up early for our drive the next day to Serra da Canastra. The monastery had laid out a small breakfast for us so I had a few bits and took a couple of things for later in the journey. We were on the road not long after 05:00.  At 8:00 am we arrived in Belo Horizonte. Driving through I shot a few street scenes from the minibus. Not my usual kind of thing, but I was drawn by the interesting Graffiti. 

 

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PA040362 Belo Horizonte by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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PA040359 adj Belo Horizonte by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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PA040356 Belo Horizonte by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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PA040373 Belo Horizonte by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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PA040376 Belo Horizonte by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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PA040378 Belo Horizonte by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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PA040379 Belo Horizonte by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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PA040385 Belo Horizonte by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

We pulled into a hotel where we met our new guide, the lovely Mariana Vabo. Mariana is a biologist,  from São Roque de Minas at the foot of the National Park and has her own business Abra-Canastra Expedições.  She continued on with us and we said our goodbyes to Rene.

 

We were originally meant to have Rene continue with us for the remaining three nights but he later advise me that he had a diary clash and that Mariana would be our replacement. I was initially concerned by this turn of events, but Rene put my mind at rest advising that Marian was in fact far more familiar with the area than he was and would ensure we had a great time. The recommendation proved to be spot on! I felt a sisterly bond with Mariana right away and she was a delight to spend time with.  

 

30814569577_a236249178_h.jpgPA040402 Mariana & Myself by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

We arrived just before 14:00 in São Roque de Minas where we had a delicious buffet lunch. We then drove the short distance and checked into our rooms in pousada Barcelos. This was effectively a B&B, we ate out lunch and dinner every day at several different, but all excellent local establishments whilst here. After settling in and taking a quick dip in the pool, we assembled for a drive to a local area for birding late afternoon. We were transported in a modified hatchback car - it was a little cramped and a little low to the ground to be particularly effective for wildlife drives, so it was good that we got out and birded a lot of the time. Our driver was Gabriel. 

 

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Gabriel by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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PA040007 Butterfly by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

Before heading out, Mariana handed us a little pocketbook covering the 100 most common birds in the Serra da Canastra ecosystem. It came in very hand for our trips out! 

 

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PA040011 Chestnut-capped Blackbird by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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PA040026 (2) adj Chestnut-capped Blackbird by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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PA040042 Dubois's Seedeater by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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PA040047 Dubois's Seedeater by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

One of the best birds of this afternoon session were the Curl-crested Jays, I thought they looked very funky with their little crests.

 

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PA040063 Curl-crested Jay by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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PA040122 Masked Water-tyrant by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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PA040127 Black-throated Saltator by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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PA040169 (2) adj Black-throated Saltator by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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PA040183 Grassland Sparrow by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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PA040114 Rusty-margined Guan by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

Our last stop of the afternoon gave us some spectacular views of the surrounding area:

 

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PA040391 Serra do Canastra National Park by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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PA040393 Serra do Canastra National Park by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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PA040394 Serra do Canastra National Park by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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PA040404 Sunset by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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PA040416 Sunset by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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PA040419 Sunset by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

That evening we went out to one of the local restaurants and had a delicious a la carte meal. This mad a nice change from the buffet style we'd been so accustomed to over the past three weeks and gave us a chance to try some local dishes. 

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kittykat23uk

5 October 2018

 

The next morning we were at our B&B in Canastra, having a rather delicious breakfast. There were some moggies that were hanging around. All of a sudden Bob jumped up from the breakfast table and shot out the door muttering that a cat was chasing after something. Of course I followed straight away and was surprised to see a rather angry looking gremlin facing down the cat! I was overcome with excitement as I realised it was an opossum! Of course I didn't have my camera so I raced back to my room hoping I wouldn't be too late. Thankfully it was right by the breakfast room and I was back in time to snap a few shots of this cute little critter. This was I believe my very first Marsupial and ticked my box for whacky, cute and unusual so it tops the highlight list especially as it was completely unplanned.

 

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PA050195 (3) White-eared Opossum by Jo Dale, on Flickr 

 

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PA050195 White-eared Opossum by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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PA050199 (2) White-eared Opossum by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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PA050199 White-eared Opossum by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

Well that was a fantastic start to the day! Then we were of with Mari and Gabriel to explore the park for the day. 

 

Serra da Canastra National Park is in the south west of Minas Gerais to the north of Rio Grande. It is in the Cerrado biome. The park was created on 3 April 1972.. It is administered by the Chico Mendes Institute for Biodiversity Conservation (ICMBio). It lies in the municipalities of São Roque de Minas , Sacramento , Capitólio , Vargem Bonita , São João Batista do Glória and Delfinópolis in the state of Minas Gerais. The park has an area of 71,525 hectares and 173km of perimeter. 

 

The park lies on the watershed between the San Francisco and Parana rivers. It preserves the headwaters of the San Francisco River , which flows east from the park. In the south it feeds the Rio Grande and in the north the Araguari River , which rises in the park and is a tributary of the Paranaíba River . The Rio Grande and Paranaíba flow west and join the Paraná. 

 

Altitude ranges from 750 to 1,490 meters (2,460 to 4,890 ft). On this our first full day we explored the top on the park and it's high grasslands. The road cuts through the highest part of the park from east to west for more than 60 kilometers (37 mi). The park includes areas of scenic beauty such as cliffs with dramatic waterfalls, including the Casca D'anta, the first waterfall of the San Francisco River, with a drop of 186 meters (610 ft). Other attractions are the Pedras and the Curral de Pedras. Lookout points can be accessed by car via dirt roads in good weather. The highest peaks are almost 1,500 meters (4,900 ft).

 

Temperatures range from 1 to 29 ° C (34 to 84 ° F) and average 18 ° C (64 ° F). Average annual rainfall is 1,250 millimeters (49 in), unfortunately for us, we seemed to be there during a rather damp period.  Vegetation is mostly rocky cerrado on the plateaux, with clumps of riparian forest in the valleys and ravines. [4] There are 45 endemic species of flora. 

 

Fauna include bush dog , pampas deer , maned wolf , giant anteater , otter , titi , giant armadillo, cougar. The very rare endemic Brazilian merganser, draws birders from far and wide, but is very elusive. I had  personally chosen this place for the itinerary to give a second chance of Maned wolf, which can sometimes be seen on the high plateaux and for further chances of Giant Anteater, which @Wildship was very keen to tick off. Aside from that, for some reason I was led to the impression that armadillos should also be fairly common here,  but as it happened this is probably not the case and we did not see many more mammals. The birdlife, however was pretty spectacular.  The park is classified as IUCN protected area category II (national park). It has the objectives of preserving natural ecosystems of great ecological relevance and scenic beauty, enabling scientific research, environmental education, outdoors recreation and eco-tourism. It was also a very peaceful park to travel in, with very few visitors while we were there. 

 

We stopped any time Mari or one of us spotted any birds and mammals. 

 

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PA050272 (2) Cinnamon Tanager by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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PA050294 Chalk-browed Mockingbird by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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PA050302 adj Burnished-buff Tanager by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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PA050317 Black-throated Saltator by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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PA050311 Chopi Blackbird by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

One  sought-after bird is the Blue finch and Mari was especially thrilled to find us a couple of individuals

 

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PA050325 adj Blue Finch by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

Also sometimes known as the Yellow-billed Blue Finch, a rather unnecessarily long name, this Cerrado endemic is almost confined to Brazil, where it ranges from the state of Maranhão in the north as far south as Sao Paulo, albeit always being a local and uncommon bird, with a small extension of its range into eastern Bolivia. The slender yellow bill is immediately distinctive in all plumages, as it is only breeding-plumaged males that are clad in bright cobalt blue; note also their dull reddish legs. Females, in contrast, are chiefly rufous-brown above, streaked dusky over a buffy whitish background below. In the post-breeding season, both sexes gather into small flocks, which feed unobtrusively on the ground. However, when nesting, males perch prominently atop a low perch, on a tree or rock, uttering their sweet, thin songs for prolonged periods, both during the morning and afternoon. Blue Finches inhabit open grassy cerrados and the species is undoubtedly declining due to the widespread and virtually unchecked conversion, degradation, and fragmentation of such grasslands due to agricultural expansion.

 

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PA050340 adj Blue Finch by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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PA050357 Pale-vented Pigeon by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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PA050370 adj Plumbeous Seedeater by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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PA050380 adj Plumbeous Seedeater by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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PA050395 Wedge-tailed Grass-finch by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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PA050400 Wedge-tailed Grass-finch by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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kittykat23uk

A trio of striking birds were these yellow-rumped marshbirds, twittering away about something or other:

 

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PA050446 adj Yellow-rumped Marshbirds by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

Aside from our early win with the opossum, the only other mammals we saw were pampas deer

 

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PA050454 Pampas Deer by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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PA050466 Pampas Deer by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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PA050471 (2) Pampas Deer by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

Another little star of the cerrado is this smart Cock-tailed Tyrant. Being largely restricted to unmodified native, seasonally wet and dry grasslands, and endemic to the Cerrado biome of central South America, the Cock-tailed Tyrant is now considered globally threatened due to ongoing habitat destruction throughout much of its wide range. Although this tyrant is principally found in southern Brazil, there are also populations in northern and eastern Bolivia, and eastern Paraguay, and at least formerly the Cock-tailed Tyrant was known from extreme northeast Argentina, but there have been no records in the last-named country since the late 1970s. The species is heavily dependent on the protected areas network, and the Cock-tailed Tyrant remains locally common in some national parks and reserves. 

 

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PA050488 adj Cock-tailed Tyrant by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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PA050728 adj Cock-tailed Tyrant by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

The great birds kept on coming with cracking views of a White-eared Puffbird. The White-eared Puffbird still-hunts from mid-level perches in trees and shrubs, and will take a wide range of prey, from insects to reptiles to crabs. These birds have one of the most southerly distributions of any species of puffbird; there is some evidence that the southernmost populations of White-eared Puffbird are migratory.  White-eared Puffbirds have also been observed to lower their body temperatures and enter into torpor during cool weather.

 

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PA050545 White-eared Puffbird by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

 

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PA050568 Sooty Tyrannulet by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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PA050575 Eared Dove by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

We spotted a pretty Burrowing Night Snake Philodryas agassizii

 

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PA050588 Snake by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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PA050599 Snake by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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PA050616 Snake by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

Then Mari was on the trail of another special bird, the Brasília Tapaculo. A little skulker of a bird, discovered by Helmut Sick during biological surveys prior to the establishment of the modern-day capital of Brazil, Brasília, this tapaculo occurs in swampy gallery forest and dense streamside vegetation in the states of Goiás, Distrito Federal, and west Minas Gerais, all in central Brazil. The species seems to be mostly rare, occurring at low densities, but it can be locally common and is known from six protected areas. Nonetheless, the Brasilia Tapaculo is currently listed as Near Threatened according to IUCN criteria. It's a smart looking thing, when it dains to give you a decent view! 

 

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PA050652 Brasilia Tapaculo by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

We also saw this lizard, but I haven't managed to identify him:

 

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PA050660 Lizard sp by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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PA050733 Lizard sp by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

This strange nest belongs to a bird called the Firewood Gatherer, I don't think it takes a genius to work out why it's called that:

 

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PA050788 Firewood Gatherer nest by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

Here's a pair, just starting out with their nest:

 

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PA050678 Firewood Gatherer by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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PA050684 (2) Firewood Gatherer by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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PA050698 Firewood Gatherer by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

The nest creates a well protected place in which to lay the eggs, the entrance actually corkscrews before arriving at the nest chamber, making it difficult for larger mammals to access the nest. After the nest have been used and finished with, various other species will use the old nests for their own purposes much in the same way secondary cavity nesters use old woodpecker holes. 

 

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kittykat23uk

More different tanagers were to be found.

 

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PA050793  adj White-rumped tanager by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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PA050803 White-rumped Tanager by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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PA050835 Flowers by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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PA050838 A bee? by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

Lots of termite mounds dotted the landscape and made great vantage points from which various birds surveyed their domain.. 

 

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PA050826 Peach-fronted Parakeet by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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PA050853 adj Campo Flickers by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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PA050871 Black-masked Finch by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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PA050877 Southern Crested Caracara by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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PA050882 Southern Crested Caracara by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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PA050889 adj Sharp-tailed Tyrant by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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PA050908 Sharp-tailed Tyrant by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

 

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Tom Kellie

44740114105_2bb0e3b54d_h.jpg.819f5c6eb98317477fe2b43cd1154b40.jpg

 

 

~ @kittykat23uk

 

What a neckline!

 

That's such an elegant...or should I say elongated...profile.

 

What would a Pale-vented Pigeon have to say  to a Pitta if they talked necklaces together?

 

Tom K.

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kittykat23uk

45654703871_9ed6908640_z.jpg

PA050915 Flower by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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PA050917 Burrowing Owl by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

We headed to the small village of São João Batista da Canastra, just two kilometres from the second gate of the National Park, where we had our lunch break in a nice little restaurant. 

 

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PA050945 White-throated Kingbird by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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PA050949 (2) Sayaca Tanager by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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PA050960 adj Sayaca Tanager by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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PA050971 Maroon-bellied Parakeet by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

Hummingbirds frequented the climbers in the pergola over the front of the property and after we had a lovely meal we then were invited to spend some time in the back garden observing the hummers coming to a feeder. Bananaquits were also present. 

 

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PA051010 (2) Stripe-breasted Starthroat female by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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PA051063 Stripe-breasted Starthroat female by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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PA051088 Bananaquit by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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PA051110 Bananaquit by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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PA051135 (2) Fork-tailed Woodnymph by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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PA051148 Masked Water Tyrant by Jo Dale, on Flickr

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kittykat23uk

After doing a spot of birding around the town, and a failed attempt to look for another species of toucan we carried on back up onto the plateaux. 

 

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PA051157 adj Grey-necked Wood Rail by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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PA051181 Maroon-bellied Parakeet by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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PA051207 Glittering-bellied Emerald by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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PA051210 Streamer-tailed Tyrant by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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PA051223 Grey Monjita by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

We spent a bit of time around the waterfalls on the plateaux and this area was also a place that Mari tried to locate the most sought-after bird, Brazilian Merganser. Unfortunately the ducks proved elusive. But we did get a chance to photograph the falls. So I tried a bit of slow shutter work and got some nice results.

 

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PA050422 Waterfall by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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PA050424 by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

These falls make up the the small upper part of this waterfall.  It menaders calmly for a bit before the rivulet of the Rio São Francisco plunges 160 meters in straight over the top of the plateaux. It is the sixth highest waterfall in Brazil.

 

45704392302_c2489bdd66_z.jpgPA050430 Waterfall by Jo Dale, on Flickr 

 

As it got dark we stayed on the plateaux to spotlight, hoping that we might get a view of one of the park's 150 or so maned wolves. Sadly, the weather, low clearance of the vehicle and long grass made this quite difficult, with poor Mari hanging out of the window for dear life trying to shine the spotlight around. As a result we didn't see much of note. With the weather closing in, and stomachs rumbling, we called it a night. 


 

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kittykat23uk

6 October 2018

 

We had a bit of a dilemma of what to do on our last day. Bob was desperate to see an anteater, and really the only chance for that would be to return to the plateaux. Christa and Herbert absolutely didn't want to go back to the plateaux and instead desired to see the lower section of the park. My choice, well I was curious to see more of the park, as the different habitat brought different birding prospects. But I was torn because I didn't want Bob to miss out on his chance for anteater, plus I still hoped for a final chance for the wolf. So we did the only thing that seemed reasonable for all concerned. We agreed to do the morning at the lower section and the afternoon at the top of the park. Given that anteaters seemed to be most active in the late afternoon, and birds in the morning we all agreed this was a fair compromise. 

 

As it happened, this was probably the best decision because the morning brought thick cloud on the plateaux and we would not have seen anything at all had we been up there early on.. 

 

I think it's fair to say that I was really the only one in our group that had the patience for birding as opposed to photographing birds, and Mari took delight in showing me what Canastra had to offer. Gabriel took the others off to look for capuchins whilst we tried to call up some special avian friends. 

 

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PA061247 (2) Black-chested Buzzard-eagle by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

We were in some farmland near a babbling river and Mari was trying to find me one bird that I had expressed a strong desire to see. sadly, the murky morning really doesn't do this little gem of a hummingbird justice, but I was still stoked to see a Frilled Coquette!

 

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PA061395 Frilled Coquette by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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PA061409 Female Purple-throated Euphonia by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

We caught up to the others by the stony beach and Herbert kindly:blink::unsure:  tired to herd a rather large and rather creepy-looking spider towards me! Err yeah! Not a fan Herbert! :o No idea what species it is, so please don't ask.. ;)

 

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PA061417 spider by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

I much preferred this butterfly:

 

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PA061424 butterfly by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

Having failed to locate any monkeys, we carried on birding..

 

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PA061438 Boat-billed Flycatcher by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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PA061446 Short-crested flycatcher by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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PA061454 Butterfly by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

Another mega bird that Mari found for me was the beautiful Helmeted Manakin. I had seen this species in the Pantanal with Julio on our first trip there and it was a real rarity for that area. This one played really hard to get and I had to persevere for some time to get any decent shots.

 

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PA061486 Helmeted Mannakin by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

This is the view of the Casca D'anta the main waterfall. Unfortunately you can't drive to it, you have to hike, which we had nether the time, nor the inclination for! 

 

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PA061496 Casca D'anta by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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PA061503 Plumbeous Kite by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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PA061543 Yellow-headed Caracara by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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PA061552 Yellow-headed Caracara by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

 

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PA061556 Red-legged Seriema by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

It was now getting on for lunchtime and so we stopped off at CiRene's Restaurante just outside  São Roque de Minas for another delicious meal of fresh fish.

 

There was time for a bit of birding afterwards, parrots this time feeding on the fruiting trees in the grounds:

 

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PA061578 White-eyed Parakeet by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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PA061588 White-eyed Parakeet by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

And a very tiny parrot..

 

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PA061596 Blue-winged Parrotlet by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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PA061603 Blue-winged Parrotlet by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

Then we headed back to drop Christa and Herbert off before our afternoon drive to the top of the plateaux as they felt like taking the afternoon off. 

 

Edited by kittykat23uk
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kittykat23uk

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PA060434 Serra do Canastra National Park by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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PA060441 Serra do Canastra National Park by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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PA060442 Serra do Canastra National Park by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

In the afternoon were were back at the top of the park looking for giant anteaters. First we saw a Fork-tailed Flycatcher.

 

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PA061612 Fork-tailed Flycatcher by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

Then Mari managed to spot a shambling shape in the long grass, it was a Giant Anteater! We were able to approach quite closely, I suggested to Bob that he go first since this was his only chance of seeing one on the trip. We were able to follow for a very brief time, until the wind suddenly changed and the anteater caught wind of us. He turned tail and galloped away! 

 

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PA061619 Our last Giant Anteater Sighting by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

We spotted a few more birds, but the weather was quickly closing in so we didn't have long before we had to head back.

 

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PA061629 Southern Crested Caracara by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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PA061634 Southern Crested Caracara by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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PA061658 Interesting seed head by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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20181005_085854 Views of Canastra by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

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20181006_170919 Views of Canastra by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

 

We had another enjoyable evening of live music, delicious food and Cuba libres at a local restaurant before we retired to bed. The next day it was raining, I think Brazil was crying over our departure. We had an uneventful drive back to the airport at Belo Horizonte. I didn't take any new pictures on our final morning. We dropped Christa and Herbert at Linx Confins and headed on to get our respective flights after saying our heartfelt goodbyes to our wonderful guiding team. 

 

 

 

 

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kittykat23uk

So that is the end of the trip. 

 

Here is a link to the bird list- to be honest this is probably an under-recording as I wasn't all that disciplined where the birds were concerned!

 

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/10Crs-RvTsm_rxalY36RPlMfKM9ATA8XYFtMnQEb02EA/edit?usp=sharing

 

I'll also do a mammal one and add this later. 

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Kitsafari

the gilt-edged tanager is splendid! such a gorgeous feathered creature. love that puffer and that cock tailed tyrant - what a cute tail!

 

but for me the highlight of your second section is definitely the maned wolf. the background and history that you related made it even more special. what a stunning canid. 

 

a big thank you to you and @safarichick for working onthis TR. I'm not likely to go to SA anytime soon, so seeing its wildlife through your eyes is very special for me. 

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Great job on the trip report and thanks for all the hard work setting up the trip. I had a wonderful time.

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SafariChick

Glad Bob got to see his Giant Anteater!  It really was a great trip overall!

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kittykat23uk

Thanks all 

 

Here is the mammal list, 33 mammals seen, and we didn't really get that deep into the bats:

 

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1xNFMStMk0fGJSG-xGyehK9tI6MBdMobc4pX310r8eCE/edit?usp=sharing

 

Thanks @SafariChick and @Wildship I really enjoyed travelling with you both. @Wildship if you have any photos you'd like to add or any thoughts on your six nights feel free to add. :)

Edited by kittykat23uk
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