Jump to content

Better late than never - Porini Camps October 2018


wilddog

Recommended Posts

wilddog

Oh thanks @Atdahl lots of hiccups here! but as long as you guys can see properly it that is great :)

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 139
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • wilddog

    59

  • CDL111

    9

  • shazdwn

    6

  • Atdahl

    6

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Amboseli October 4th   The second day in Selenkay we were scheduled to drive down to Amboseli  National Park for a full day of game viewing and a picnic lunch. We had breakfast before we wen

The route to the view point was comparatively uneventful. Huge wide open spaces with animals scattered across the landscape. The day was now pretty hot and sunny, so many, may have gone to locate some

Posted Images

Great start to your time at the Mara camp, and it sounds as your room gives you some really good viewings of the wildlife.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...
wilddog

DSC08475.JPG

 

 

7th October – Mara Camp

During the day we saw a range of game and birds some of which I photographed with examples below.

 

We also visited the Hippo pool which was crammed with Hippos and a delivered a memorable. pungent smell to one's nostrils.

 

DSC08348.JPG.838b4684ce32b577ffc9c495ddb4b970.JPG

 

DSC08472.JPG.5c3ff1a1b36d955fdd59494087954edb.JPG

 

DSC08478.JPG.7166f140e6ac9b1477cb586d53ea444e.JPG

 

DSC08484.JPG.058e75eb34fcfa962db9398673b5419d.JPG

 

DSC08423.jpg.38808e456248b40d9f097aac7febdc9a.jpg

 

Breakfast was served at the top of a hill. I always enjoy these meals and love the opportunity to sit and relax my eyes gazing in to the distance.

 

Just a note to say that camping stools were provided, but I prefer to sit on the ground; it makes me feel more at one with nature.

 

20181007_094435.jpg.cf3a02ac1c729332b7a66dba36255a3a.jpg

 

20181007_093030.jpg.0e4d381bc026af0e5c30a9bcef11d19e.jpg

 

20181007_095148.jpg.ef42205f1575e0540924eef79364b3ab.jpg

 

The rest of the day would prove to be another predator, and action, packed day.

 

The morning predators.

 

Hyena

 

DSC08350.JPG.cab4d0df029dd28534c5bffa0afa61ae.JPG

 

DSC08357.JPG.237c90af9f5e1dbb8c96d502f7cc16cb.JPG

DSC08362.JPG.c77450dfa0cf81686ed61de8c7f63a38.JPG

 

DSC08366.JPG.07c5f5b1519d3846272c0972b5f584a7.JPG

 

DSC08369.JPG.453644aabd4f25ed416b02de8383b55e.JPG

 

Then a group of three lions

 

DSC08370.JPG.be89c67f80325ac054ab93d2fff6cc37.JPG

 

DSC08379.JPG.f80221e8dc56470d03e177f41f6fd005.JPG

 

DSC08381.JPG.349d5a53427281866b6ce2c2f9e6f23f.JPG

 

DSC08382.JPG.c03c4b85f6f104a1e15ae9fda0055fa9.JPG

 

Then a mating pair.

 

The male was not overly keen on our intrusion. We did see them mating but as those of you who have seen this before you know how quick this can be. My fellow travellers quite naturally interested in see in the action but by the time our guide had had moved the vehicle to a suitable spot and cameras were in hand, it was all over.

 

DSC08383.JPG.857ee0dea4befe5190dc5d7e6e9b566d.JPG

 

DSC08386.JPG.fd3fbd8faf965ea3578e1d66a284e5cd.JPG

 

DSC08395.JPG.6ebf3e3d492981438a5a7484201436ec.JPG

 

Then a pair of young male lions walking steadily across the plains

DSC08399.JPG.fe91b10911a37d8dc40770539cc06fed.JPG

 

DSC08408.JPG.13a4c17062a041b937b2facdd228a345.JPG

 

DSC08410.JPG.9d8b85c4d727308d38a6279f704f11ef.JPG

 

DSC08413.JPG.55a7cfd4fc08502853a702277b752262.JPG

 

Then Cheetah and Cubs

 

This female was called Nabor and had two maturing cubs. She was stalking the gazelle at the bottom of a slope and then burst out attempting a kill and she succeeded. Once she had caught she brought it around the back of our vehicle and then her cubs joined her.

 

DSC08429.JPG.74f12a69357ee6a936b742659bdc2c77.JPG

 

DSC08430.JPG.b2fcdc50228f178621af953b3196af1e.JPG

 

DSC08433.JPG.7e257813baccbf33c5032271c6ea84a9.JPG

 

 

DSC08437.JPG

DSC08438.JPG.a2f983d220435445533ccdc592007308.JPG

 

DSC08445.JPG.68adbfbe65024ebde3405fe58caf7793.JPG

 

The first clip in the video is slowed by 50% to show Nabor in action. Some of it is a bit shaky, so my apologies

 

 

 

Afternoon predators

 

This proved to be one of the most unusual and rare sightings of my life and that of the guides, none of whom had ever seen this before.

 

The python was first spotted by one of the passengers in the other camp vehicle. As we drove over to join them we could see the python had caught a male Thomsons Gazelle. This was an unexpected bonus and I was delighted but also, delighted, to see the excitement of the guides. This was something really special.

 

Some of you may have seen some of these images before in another thread but I have also included some video this time.

 

We watched for at lesat an hour as the python, dislocated his jaw to get  got his mouth around the gazelle and used his coils to crush the shoulders and rib cage of the Tommy. Fascinating.

 

The whole thing took around 2.5 hours so the majority in the vehicle decided they wanted to move off for a while. Personally I was disappointed about this but 4 to 1 is a majority decision. This meant that when we got back the whole thing was nearly over.

 

DSC08509.JPG.4e4c78276881d4ff74299c35be7e99ce.JPG

 

DSC08522.JPG.3345705e4d8a61d2c770292b75710d33.JPG

 

DSC08530.JPG.c449ffb7bf79dfd53909f76794bd0d3e.JPG

 

DSC08534.JPG.02a48029eba247bb5d0d071c5527997c.JPG

 

DSC08564_edited-1.jpg.fe2c29f978c750110b1f29e46edb49fb.jpg

 

DSC08568.JPG.dafa90d35022efce4c5cfa25a11a06d6.JPG

 

DSC08575.JPG.a17dae0849aae812e2db6005855e2bf4.JPG

 

DSC08581.JPG.536e96267cab42f7b24e2b9ccf3abb44.JPG

 

 

 

So what did we see when we wandered off ?

 

Another Cheetah (name not noted) with very young cubs. Mum wanted a bit of privacy, her stomach looked full I thought, so was rather hidden by the bush but the cubs, as is often the way, were curious.

 

DSC08546.JPG.405aa97dea49d9675f1cc5c1e765e662.JPG

 

DSC08556.JPG.9ce295a8cad8f967e95cd60b193b9cdc.JPG

 

DSC08558.JPG.2fa42fab47f64543d13d4e1b7598e65f.JPG

 

DSC08559.JPG.415ccf3034b33e463b0291495e06282b.JPG

 

What a day!

 

 

 

Edited by wilddog
Link to post
Share on other sites
Towlersonsafari

Wonderful  report @wilddog and to see a python kill!

Link to post
Share on other sites
offshorebirder

What a day indeed @wilddog!    What a great experience seeing the Python with the gazelle, not to mention the Cheetahs, Lions, etc.  

 

Sorry you missed a good look at the Striped Hyena.

Link to post
Share on other sites

A python kill, its a shame your fellow guests didn't appreciate how rare and special that siting was. OK the cheetah cubs are cute and good to see but the chance to see a python in action will probably never occur again. Just for info, a snake doesn't dislocate its jaw to swallow as is widely believed, it is now known that it has specially elongated jaw ligaments to allow the wide gape nessicary to swallow large prey.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
amybatt

@wilddog WOW!  Even manically snake-phobic me would stay for that sighting.  That’s the stuff you see in social media and say “thank god I didn’t see that” but if you do....you HAVE to stay!  Nice capture in any event.   And definitely a life sighting.

 

For @wilddog and anyone else who may know... how exactly was that Tommie slow enough to get caught? Are pythons capable of lightning fast captures? And when the python is done eating does it just stay put until it’s digested, or does it wander off with that bulge?  Inquiring minds want to know.  (I consider this step 1 in my 12-step program to appreciate snakes...)

Link to post
Share on other sites
wilddog

Not sure but I think the python just sneaks up on a grazing and unsuspecting animal and once it has wrapped around a leg, job done. 

 

I don't know how long it stayed in place but it was not there in the morning.

 

The capture and consumption took place near a group of trees and long grass so my guess, it got out of sight until it could make speedier progress. 

 

If we have some snake experts here hopefully they can clarify. 

Edited by wilddog
Link to post
Share on other sites
Atravelynn

So YOU are the better late than never visitor, Wilddog!  I’ll read this as an inspiration to also be a late arrival.

At least you plenty of time to rest up on the plane after sprinting between terminals, weighted down with your camera gear.

That darn camera clock!  I always have such good intentions but about 25% of the time I mess up somehow, and with 2 cameras that need setting, I have double the chance for something to go wrong.  A friend just showed me in Lightroom that you can change the time on a whole group of photos by x # of hours and minutes.  I don’t have Lightroom, but it could help with incorrect time settings.

The open sided vehicles would make that first ele encounter for new guests even more exciting.  I hope they were equally thrilled with my favorite bird that popped up next—Hoopoe!

Nice they did get their lion but what a battered specimen.  Did your guide give any odds for a recovery for the lion?  I see there were more lions in fitter condition to be found.  Good for the Utah couple and for the lions.

You did well with cheetah.  The video works fine with firefox.  At least you were rewarded with more cheetah cubs!!! after being outvoted on leaving the python feasting.  Maybe some of your vehiclemates were not that keen on snakes.

I spotted an English breakfast in the Mara!

Fantastic Porini Safari!

Link to post
Share on other sites
Kitsafari

Wow what a "predatorful" day! That python is ginormous! I can't imagine how it can swallow as entire male Tommy and I'm sorry you didn't get a chance to observe the entire sequence. 

 

The lions look healthy and well fed and the cheetahs look good as well. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Amazing seeing a python kill.  I am really enjoying your report.

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

What fantastic sighting to see a python kill, it really is disappointing when other guests are not appreciative of something that is unique. I am sure that the guides would have also been very happy to have stayed to watch.

Link to post
Share on other sites
wilddog

Thanks @CDL111 @Raelond @Kitsafari and @Atravelynn

 

I think the guides would have preferred to stay too; but I have to remind myself that the other guests were first timers 'in the bush'  and the iconic species were what they wanted.

 

I might have felt the same many years ago. 

 

For me it was unforgettable

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
Atravelynn
6 hours ago, wilddog said:

Thanks @CDL111 @Raelond @Kitsafari and @Atravelynn

 

I think the guides would have preferred to stay too; but I have to remind myself that the other guests were first timers 'in the bush'  and the iconic species were what they wanted.

 

I might have felt the same many years ago. 

 

For me it was unforgettable

 

 

What an agreeable safari-mate you are.  And I know that for a fact.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Amylovescritters

REMARKABLE python action. Pythons, and many serpents, are typically lay in wait predators. They coil and patiently wait for an unknowing victim to happen by. Their wonderfully beautiful markings provide the perfect camouflage. Where they do not have the speed to “chase down” prey once a victim is in striking distance the strike, grab, and coil are lightning fast and virtually inescapable. These large constrictors are immensely powerful. This is likely how this beauty caught the Thomy. 

Some snake species will chase down prey but these snakes are built for speed (lean and fast) and generally diurnal, such as the deadly black mamba or the non-venomous racers here in the states. These types of snakes will “periscope” or raise the forefront of their bodies off the ground while searching for prey and are very athletic. Another example of a lay and wait, ambush serpent would be rattlesnakes, and most viperidae. Just fascinating. I am so jealous. I think I would have come unglued if I was not able to witness this entire feeding, but I am a herpetolgist and snakes are truly my passion. So jealous. I would just be over the moon!

Link to post
Share on other sites
wilddog

Thanks for the information @Amylovescritters

 

I must say it was fascinating to watch the crushing technique. 

 

Glad you enjoyed the python event and perhaps...one day for you too . ?

 

 

Edited by wilddog
Link to post
Share on other sites
Amylovescritters

I leave for 2 weeks 17 days in TZ in 5 weeks @wilddog... Fingers definitely crossed for simple sightings let alone a kill and feast!! Fantastic report. Thanks for sharing!

Link to post
Share on other sites
Amylovescritters

Not two weeks but 17 days... only 14 days are safari though. Excuse typo

Link to post
Share on other sites
wilddog

enjoy your travels @Amylovescritters.  I know that feeling ... simple sightings are never to be 'sniffed at'.  They are the mainstay of safari; the others are once in a lifetime for most of us. :)

 

Looking forward to hearing about it when you get back.

Link to post
Share on other sites
amybatt
34 minutes ago, Amylovescritters said:

REMARKABLE python action. Pythons, and many serpents, are typically lay in wait predators. They coil and patiently wait for an unknowing victim to happen by. Their wonderfully beautiful markings provide the perfect camouflage. Where they do not have the speed to “chase down” prey once a victim is in striking distance the strike, grab, and coil are lightning fast and virtually inescapable. These large constrictors are immensely powerful. This is likely how this beauty caught the Thomy. 

Some snake species will chase down prey but these snakes are built for speed (lean and fast) and generally diurnal, such as the deadly black mamba or the non-venomous racers here in the states. These types of snakes will “periscope” or raise the forefront of their bodies off the ground while searching for prey and are very athletic. Another example of a lay and wait, ambush serpent would be rattlesnakes, and most viperidae. Just fascinating. I am so jealous. I think I would have come unglued if I was not able to witness this entire feeding, but I am a herpetolgist and snakes are truly my passion. So jealous. I would just be over the moon!

 

thank you for this excellent description, @Amylovescritters! Hopefully you’ll get to see this for yourself out there on safari one day!  Maybe your next one!

Edited by amybatt
Link to post
Share on other sites
Amylovescritters

Thanks ladies... I will be so happy to be back in Africa again (last Safari was 2004) and whatever Mother Nature blesses me with will be wonderful, but one can hope. Lol

Link to post
Share on other sites
michael-ibk

Extraordinary, extraordinary stuff with the Python Linda! And many other top sightings as well, really enjoying your report.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Safaritalk uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. By using Safaritalk you agree to our use of cookies. If you wish to refuse the setting of cookies you can change settings on your browser to clear and block cookies. However, by doing so, Safaritalk may not work properly and you may not be able to access all areas. If you are happy to accept cookies and haven't adjusted browser settings to refuse cookies, Safaritalk will issue cookies when you log on to our site. Please also take a moment to read the Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy: Terms of Use l Privacy Policy