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wilddog

Personal anecdotes - your most memorable experiences in the bush

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wilddog

I understand you @micmic and @ForWildlifeThere is a difference in qualifications between a tour guide/driver and a safari/wildlife guide.

 

To those who are experienced in safari travel we know what we are looking for but I do get concerned that new safari guests may not understand this. I think if this requires further discussion is it worth opening  a new topic on this subject  @ForWildlife do you want to lead the way on this?

 

 

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xcrunch

Our most memorable moment was in early June 2016 at Little Kwara Camp.  Our afternoon drive was not as successful as the previous two. We tried to re find the leopard we had been tracking but were unable to do so.  After searching a long time we all decided to go and try to find the cheetah cubs again. They had moved further North – East, but we did find them. It was obvious that they had not eaten and the mother desperately wanted to find a kill. We watched until the sunset and then started back to camp. This is when a call came in from another guide who had gone East almost to the border of the Shinde concession. A “Drama” was unfolding we were told, would we like to see it. Of Course! Dix (our guide) said to all of us to get into the front two rows of the vehicle as he was going to drive very fast. We all hung on for dear life! and within 20 minutes came across the two male lions they call the “Residents”. They were marking their territory by rolling into the grass, and brushing against the bushes. In the background you heard the roar of lions and we were told that there was a group of four young males coming into the area that were going to make their claim. Deep down we were all hoping to see a fight between them, but it was almost completely dark by this time. The “Residents” began to respond to the roaring of the intruders by roaring themselves, each time getting louder and longer in succession. We lost them when they went into some thick brush. But then low and behold we come across the four intruders. They continue to roar less than five feet from the car. All of us had shivers going up and down our spine. They began to cancel all the markings that the “Residents” had made, going from one bush to the other, and rerolling in the same spots that they had been. At this point all of us were in awe of what we were witnessing. Then a third roar chimed in from a totally different direction. We were told this was the Marsh Bros. ika “ the Hippos Killers” whose large territory goes from the Shinde Concession to the Kwara one. They were responding to tell both of these groups who the real boss was. And in a flash the “Drama” was over when the “Residents” decided to vacate the territory, and move further East. No battle – it was already 9.30 so we decided at this point to go back to camp. But the roaring continued for the rest of the night.  That changed my perspective of what Africa really is, and made me realize I have to go back.  We have just finished booking a trip for June 2020 and can't wait.

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wilddog

I can almost feel the vibration of the vehicle due to the lions roar so close, as you describe it. Awe inspiring and spine tingling sound particularly when you can hardly seem them. Thanks for sharing

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vikramghanekar
On 9/7/2019 at 4:30 PM, xcrunch said:

Our most memorable moment was in early June 2016 at Little Kwara Camp.  Our afternoon drive was not as successful as the previous two. We tried to re find the leopard we had been tracking but were unable to do so.  After searching a long time we all decided to go and try to find the cheetah cubs again. They had moved further North – East, but we did find them. It was obvious that they had not eaten and the mother desperately wanted to find a kill. We watched until the sunset and then started back to camp. This is when a call came in from another guide who had gone East almost to the border of the Shinde concession. A “Drama” was unfolding we were told, would we like to see it. Of Course! Dix (our guide) said to all of us to get into the front two rows of the vehicle as he was going to drive very fast. We all hung on for dear life! and within 20 minutes came across the two male lions they call the “Residents”. They were marking their territory by rolling into the grass, and brushing against the bushes. In the background you heard the roar of lions and we were told that there was a group of four young males coming into the area that were going to make their claim. Deep down we were all hoping to see a fight between them, but it was almost completely dark by this time. The “Residents” began to respond to the roaring of the intruders by roaring themselves, each time getting louder and longer in succession. We lost them when they went into some thick brush. But then low and behold we come across the four intruders. They continue to roar less than five feet from the car. All of us had shivers going up and down our spine. They began to cancel all the markings that the “Residents” had made, going from one bush to the other, and rerolling in the same spots that they had been. At this point all of us were in awe of what we were witnessing. Then a third roar chimed in from a totally different direction. We were told this was the Marsh Bros. ika “ the Hippos Killers” whose large territory goes from the Shinde Concession to the Kwara one. They were responding to tell both of these groups who the real boss was. And in a flash the “Drama” was over when the “Residents” decided to vacate the territory, and move further East. No battle – it was already 9.30 so we decided at this point to go back to camp. But the roaring continued for the rest of the night.  That changed my perspective of what Africa really is, and made me realize I have to go back.  We have just finished booking a trip for June 2020 and can't wait.

What a story ! When you hear lions roaring next to your vehicle or in the dead of the night as you lie back in your tent, you don't forget that sound for a long time!

 

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monalisa

I had a hyena run through my small campsite in Botswana once while I was sitting by a fire. From the car they don't look very big, but when you're level with them they are enormous. That was a fleeting but great memory. It made me rethink how big all the animals really are!

 

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chui71

It was June 2015. I was in Nambiti GR (Kwa Zulu Natal, South Africa). I was with my first daughter, almost 4 years old at the time.

We were having our break of the afternoon game drive. The ranger was at one side of the table serving sundowner and I was at the other side of the table speaking to him.  Suddenly I saw the ranger open his eyes wide, he stopped smiling and talking and shouted very seriously "everybody in the vehicle, now!!!". It wasn't my first safari so I knew he had surely seen something very dangerous. I saw his worried look and I knew he wasn't kidding at all.  There was something very dangerous behind me but I had no time to look and watch. i had to locate my daughter first.  She was right  beside me so the first thing I did it was to take her in my arms. The vehicle was 2 meters from me on my right. I took a step in the direction of the vehicle and in the meanwhile I took a fast look behind me to see what was the problem. I saw a big male lion no more than 8 meters from me. He was standing and watching us. The vehicle was now less than one meter from me and I almost threw my daughter on it. Than I took a second step to jump my self in the vehicle. 

When i was in the vehicle I realized we were in the front row. Since we used to seat in the back row (the children seat of my daughter was fixed there) I thought it was better to go there and leave everyone his own seat (I didn't want to change the order in a panic moment). So I started to climb over the seat with my daughter in my arm to reach the back row. While doing this I took a look at the lion: it was still motionless looking at us, while the other safarigoers where hurrying to the vehicle. It was almost in my seat where I heard my daughter saying: "Dad, why is everybody running??? You don't have to run with lions!!!". When I saw that everybody was seated in the vehicle, I got a very silent laugh. I was in fact very proud of her. It was  her 4th time in Africa and since she was able to understand my words I teached  her that whatever will happen she never has to run with lions.

Sometimes education pays :D.

After a couple of minutes the lion went. The ranger  asked if everybody was okay,  he took a big breath of relief and smiled. He then jumped out of the vehicle, cleared the table, folded it and put it into the vehicle. He then we went for the lion to locate him and take a picture of the big guy who scared us. 

Here it was

 

1121974301_Sudafrica2015completo(2345).JPG.5021ae04367e50c84b0f6856b5ddf2bd.JPG

 

Once back, at the lodge,  before dinner, the staff wanted to hear our story. Everybody explained his own story. I spoke to a man that was drinking is second beer and told me that he felt as a new man and had to celebrate :D. In fact, when he heard the ranger saying to jump into the vehicle he turned around to see what was the problem and the lion was less than 5 meters from him. When he started to run for the vehicle he also cut the way of his wife and jumped in the car first :D

When it was my turn I told the ranger what my daughter said. He bursted into laughs and called the other rangers to tell them what she said. During  dinner my daughter was the queen of the evening: all the rangers came to tell her she did good and she was very happy. I'm still in contact with the ranger and he told me that he still recounts this anectode on every sundowner :D.

 

 

 

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