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GAME: name that bird!


Jochen

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mvecht

@Galana  You are correct. We did have one of its cousins recently and as another clue I can tell that its range does include areas that you have visitedB)

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I've always viewed the thread "Where was the picture taken" as an extension of this thread "Name the bird", except that the former had to have a picture of wildlife, not necessary a bird. I think both

Woo Hoo! You got it. @mvecht It is a female Jungle Bush Quail. Shot (with a camera ) in Ranthambhore n November 2019     and here is the male    

~ Dear Friends @Soukousand @Galana:   Thank you so much for your kind comments above. I'm grateful for your interest in the East Asian students who have enjoyed playing this game.  

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Galana

Yes. It's a Prinia alright, the tail is a dead giveaway. I was mighty tempted with a Cisticola at first.

But it is not one of the usual 'african' ones.

So we are looking at Asia I think. That would mean India for me and I sense northern climes.

Kaziranga and the Terai.

I think I saw it in Corbett.

Graceful Prinia I think as a starter down the list.

Edited by Galana
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mvecht

@Galana  well done. This particular Graceful Prinia was photographed in the Northwestern part of its range in Israel.

As you mentioned the tail was a giveaway.

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Galana

OK.

I hope there are others playing but staying silent.

This couple may draw them out.

Not one of my best efforts but......

2.JPG.7d6b30b6d195011de958069a63634b2e.JPG

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Soukous

I didn't know Ewoks were birds :D

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inyathi

@GalanaI have been following along, I was confident that the mockingbird was a mockingbird, but I was too busy to look up which one, and I recognised the spiderhunter from my Asian travels, I wasn't sure about the prinia though, as to your birds, I recognise them from my travels also, so for the moment at least, I will offer the following as the answer:D 

 

13720183355_ee96d4e7c9_o.jpg 

Edited by inyathi
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Soukous

OK, I'll get the ball rolling ... Great Horned Owl

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Galana

Not a Great Horned Owl I am afraid.

I think @inyathihas it nailed as I thought he might but for the time being play on.

 

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inyathi

I will post the name some time tomorrow, if no one, if no one else has taken a guess, even if you've not seen it, this owl is a very easy one, if you have been to anywhere in the right part of the world, because it appears in a whole bunch of different bird books, it is so distinctive that if you have any of these books, finding the answer is simple, if you don't then you'll have to rely on the internet.

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Soukous

OK, another try .. a Fish Owl. Neither photo really gives a good look at the eyes but I'll opt for Buffy Fish Owl,

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Galana

Sorry. Not a Fish Owl and to help you find the right book you are on the wrong continent.

Maybe to slow @inyathi down I should insist on him naming the river I was on.:P

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inyathi

@Galana, I might get it wrong, but I could take a good shot, as I don't believe you have travelled as extensively in that part of the world, as some here have and I'm confident as to which country you were in when you saw them, I could if it helps at all give your approximate latitude at the time and suggest 0 degrees.:D

 

I will wait and see what if any answers appear tomorrow, before deciding when or if to jump in.    

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janzin

Pretty certain its a Crested Owl, one of the few large owls I still need to see in Central/South America.

 

For extra credit I'll say the Napo River in Ecuador, but if its the wrong river I hope I'm not disqualified (this isn't the "where were you" game :)

 

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Soukous
2 hours ago, janzin said:

Pretty certain its a Crested Owl, one of the few large owls I still need to see in Central/South America.

 

For extra credit I'll say the Napo River in Ecuador, but if its the wrong river I hope I'm not disqualified (this isn't the "where were you" game :)

 

 

If @janzinis correct I'm not surprised I didn't get it as I've never ventured into that Continent. 

BTW, Happy New Year Janet.

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Galana
6 hours ago, janzin said:

For extra credit I'll say the Napo River in Ecuador,

Give the lady a Kewpie Doll. It was the Napo down near Sani Lodge.

And whilst @inyathigot the latitude correct and darn well knew the bird from the get go the Line honours go to @janzin.

Happy New Year too and commiserations to @Soukouswho went the wrong way round the 'Blue Marble' we all call home.

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inyathi

@Galana

I assumed that you had seen the birds in the Ecuadorean Amazon, so I had guessed the Napo River as the likely location, although I’m sure it must be possible to visit other areas of the Amazon in Ecuador.

 

The Crested owl is a predominantly tropical rainforest species, found in both North and South America, I looked at its distribution on the IUCN Red List website and it lists 17 countries, hence it is found in a lot of different bird books. I have, I think four South American books that it is in, and there are a few more South American books that I don’t have, and there are a lot of different Central American books available now. So, there must now be over a dozen field guides that contain crested owl, it is the only owl in the region with prominent white ear-tufts like that, @Soukous but of course, if you’ve never been to Central or South America, then you won't have any of these books on your shelf, finding it then is not quite so easy, as you may not have seen a picture of it before.  Great horned owl does occur in the same region, but it's much bigger and the ear-tufts are not white.     

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Galana
20 minutes ago, inyathi said:

although I’m sure it must be possible to visit other areas of the Amazon in Ecuador.

Yes. You should take a week or so down the Shiripuna with the Huaorani indigenes. We did.

For background read "Savages" by Joe Kane. Great account of the Oil problem.

Peter Allison (Aussie author of a few books on African) also traveled that way.

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janzin

I know you are all waiting eagerly for the next installment...I haven't forgotten...been busy...hope to post something later today :)

 

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janzin

Okay try this one.

 

JZ8_6074.jpg.d9438f39d6862de29574558f641ba078.jpg

 

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Galana

Wild first guess. Blue-winged Warbler (f)?

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janzin
46 minutes ago, Galana said:

Wild first guess. Blue-winged Warbler (f)?

Nope.

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mvecht

@janzinLooks like a warbler and it is yellow. Yellow Warbler B)

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Galana

Prothonotary Warbler?

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janzin

nope, not Prothonotary nor Yellow Warbler. 

 

I'm not ready to give a hint quite yet :)

 

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Galana
19 hours ago, janzin said:

I'm not ready to give a hint quite yet :)

 

Well confirmation that we are on the correct continent would help.:(

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