Jump to content

GAME: name that bird!


Jochen

Recommended Posts

inyathi

@Galana Well the bird in your first shot clearly has a red eye and only the female of the Rwenzori has a red eye, the male in your next shot has I would say an orange eye, there are a few other batis species illustrated with red eyes in Birds of Africa South of the Sahara, but most species have yellow eyes, Stevenson and Fanshawe doesn't illustrate the female Rwenzori, so it would have been easy to get thrown by the eye colour. My first thought when I saw it, was it is a batis, the absence of any sign of a wattle around the eye, ruled out wattle-eyes. It was the dark head, the absence of a supercilium and the eye that gave it away. 

 

Have ago at this, it shouldn't be too hard. 

 

191.jpg.8e384ad6efe65731c3c923698fbb3bce.jpg

Edited by inyathi
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 2.9k
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • inyathi

    383

  • Galana

    275

  • Soukous

    257

  • kittykat23uk

    226

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

I've always viewed the thread "Where was the picture taken" as an extension of this thread "Name the bird", except that the former had to have a picture of wildlife, not necessary a bird. I think both

Woo Hoo! You got it. @mvecht It is a female Jungle Bush Quail. Shot (with a camera ) in Ranthambhore n November 2019     and here is the male    

I was lured here by  the call of a Siren and like all Siren calls I may end up on the rocks as they are hard to resist. But may I offer a Clapper Lark? I was gong for Eastern Clapper but maybe Ca

Posted Images

Galana
11 hours ago, inyathi said:

it would have been easy to get thrown by the eye colour.

How very true. There were are sequence of four shots taken over 2mins 30secs. My 2nd was '1st', my 1st was the 2nd if you understand what I mean.

3 & 4 are here (in the interest of scientific research)

1139901937_1-EastAfrica20101034.jpg.fe191258aab6495434649102b089fc29.jpg

833469385_1-EastAfrica20101035.jpg.7e421e9a8e9144b79a8802b582c88953.jpg

My money is on them all being the same bird given the time scale. Of course we could have had a pair as they are tough little buggers to get to sit still.;). (And even tougher for me to get them in the viewfinder when they do!!:angry:)

 

12 hours ago, inyathi said:

Have ago at this, it shouldn't be too hard. 

Really?

Link to post
Share on other sites
Galana
13 hours ago, inyathi said:

it shouldn't be too hard. 

I think the least you could have  done is got that darn bird to clean its feet and bill.  I thought 'black' until I noted some red showing through.

I have wavered from Cape Spurfowl (imm ) to Swainson's via Natal and Nahan.

Nothing to bring on a surge of excitement.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Galana

Well that was a blind alley indeed.

Woodhen or Weka I think from NZ.

Link to post
Share on other sites
inyathi

@Galana I was going to be rude and suggest that it is not the bird that needs cleaning and that perhaps you could make use of a lens cloth :lol:, but you quickly realised your mistake and demonstrated that as I said, it shouldn't be too hard, my bird is a Stewart Island Weka (Gallirallus australis scotti) photographed on Ulva Island, a tiny bird sanctuary off Stewart Island, I didn't ask for the specific subspecies, so Weka is the correct answer I wanted. The Weka is a flightless rail endemic to New Zealand, like so many of New Zealand's birds the population has suffered markedly due to a combination of habitat loss and introduced predators, predator free islands like Ulva are important for their survival, although being omnivores, they are themselves predators and will take lizards and the eggs and young of other ground nesting birds, so they can't be introduced to some of the smaller off-shore islands, that have been turned into sanctuaries for other endangered species.  They are very curious and confiding birds, not afraid of people, Ulva Island is a short distance by water taxi from Oban the main town on Stewart Island, Wekas are still reasonably common on Stewart Island itself, but perhaps more easily seen on Ulva, some of the bird species introduced to Ulva like South Island Saddleback and Yellowhead are not found on Stewart, and other species are more common on Ulva. The island makes for a great daytrip or half daytrip, I walked around the island birding on my own, but you can do guided tours like in this video, which illustrates how confiding wekas are.

 

 

 

Back to you.

 

Edited by inyathi
Link to post
Share on other sites
Galana

Thanks. My thought process was convoluted. I went into "AutoFrancolin" mode where leg and bill colour play a large part in Field clues. Hence my comment on clean legs and bill as they were neither black not red. Then came a 'eureka' moment when my hard stare at the bill to get to grips with the colour revealed it was not a Francolin bill but possibly a crake or rail. The brown plumage threw me a little til I remembered the flightless rails down under and "job done!" Or so I thought and hoped.

Back with another soon.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Galana

Here we go.

Time for an LB J.

1-DSCN0481.JPG.74885097ca4332e9ec3c00cfc0a4a2c6.JPG

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

@GalanaSince no one has gone for this, I thought it was time to make a guess, to show this game hasn't been forgotten, I'm not at all confident that this is correct, but I think I am probably in the right region of the world, is it a Sind Sparrow (Passer pyrrhonotus)?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Gosh. There is life out there after all. I was thinking I had locked down too hard! Where is everybody?

Sorry @inyathiit is not a Sind Sparrow (I had to look that one up.:o)

This is one that actually does what it says in the book.

Link to post
Share on other sites
inyathi

@Galana

 

I thought that was likely wrong, but my initial thought had been, that it might be a female rosefinch, but after looking at the different species, I changed my mind and binned that idea, and looked at other options but clearly not the right one.

 

I will now suggest the humble Rock Sparrow (Petronia petronia)

Link to post
Share on other sites
Galana
5 hours ago, inyathi said:

I will now suggest the humble Rock Sparrow (Petronia petronia)

Sorry. Not the humble or any other Petronia.

Good to see somebody trying. I would have thought this would have been right up somebody's street. How about you @Peter Connan?

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
Soukous

It looks very much like a female House Sparrow to me. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
Galana
3 hours ago, Soukous said:

It looks very much like a female House Sparrow to me. 

It does but it's not. Try not to ruffle the birds feathers as it may sue.

Good to see another player returning.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Soukous

I should be used to the fact that your replies are as cryptic as the Daily Telegraph crossword. Which I also rarely succeed with.

 

I'm now leaning towards Bishops & Queleas, although the bill does not look chunky enough, but as the illustrations from one book to the next barely resemble each other I am not really much closed to an answer. :(

Link to post
Share on other sites
pedro maia
41 minutes ago, Soukous said:

I should be used to the fact that your replies are as cryptic as the Daily Telegraph crossword. Which I also rarely succeed with.

 

I'm now leaning towards Bishops & Queleas, although the bill does not look chunky enough, but as the illustrations from one book to the next barely resemble each other I am not really much closed to an answer. :(

 

I don´t read the Daily Telegraph but to say that @Galana´s replies are cryptic may be an understatement, just look where we are in the other game...

Link to post
Share on other sites
mvecht

@Galana How about Lark-like Bunting?

Link to post
Share on other sites
Galana

Now perhaps the clue was not so cryptic after all. Or Michael just knew the answer.

It is indeed a Lark-like Bunting. Take the initials LLB and you have a Bachelor of Law although perhaps our non British players would not know that.

'Up your street' was for @Peter Connanas the bird is almost a SW African Endemic. This particular specimen frequented my tent at Entendeka Lodge along with about 50 of his relatives.. I would have thought the red/brown primaries would have done enough.

I love the description in Sinclair. "A rather nondescript superficially lark-like bunting". Well it bloody would be with a name like that, hence my comment

On 1/18/2021 at 11:17 PM, Galana said:

This is one that actually does what it says in the book.

What more can a man do?

All yours @mvecht

Link to post
Share on other sites
mvecht

@Galana as a non native Englisk speaker the LLB clue went over my head but bringing Peter Connan into the game led me in the right directionB)

Have a go at this one.

Not the best picture but it should still be possible to work it out.

IMG_4963Crcl.jpg.565063bcc1912b7624eff865f25ab854.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Safaritalk uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. By using Safaritalk you agree to our use of cookies. If you wish to refuse the setting of cookies you can change settings on your browser to clear and block cookies. However, by doing so, Safaritalk may not work properly and you may not be able to access all areas. If you are happy to accept cookies and haven't adjusted browser settings to refuse cookies, Safaritalk will issue cookies when you log on to our site. Please also take a moment to read the Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy: Terms of Use l Privacy Policy