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Galana
4 hours ago, inyathi said:

I'm certainly no expert on these matters, so  I'll leave it to you guys to decide.

 

I have always been led to believe the Duiker was 'Rwenzori Red' since my first sightings back in 2002. It was mentioned in my early guide books and called that locally.  I am more than happy to still learn.

The quote says it all. "Sightings of very russet duikers from the bamboo zone of Bwindi forest in SW Uganda suggest a distinctive duiker in relictual habitat once similar to that in which C. rubidus occurs in the Rwenzori Mts." There is a lot of commonality of species between the two areas.

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Thinking of our time at Mweya Lodge reminds me of another event that should not pass unrecorded. There is a band of Banded Mongoose to be found in the grounds that can give rise to some unusual e

Boat with Jo and Zvezda took a closer position, but the sun was behind the bird. We have stopped at a distance yet the sun position was more favourable. Then the clicking started. OK, clicking started

As the title is suggesting, there were 7 specials for Zvezda and me during this trip. As the number is not 5, the tale is not about the five travellers in our group; although all of them are special,

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Galana
4 hours ago, xelas said:

butterflies and moths (please help with ID). And squirrels.

I will leave the Squirrels to Jo and her experts but I have always regarded, been advised, that the plain one is Carruther's Mountain Squirrel and the striped one a Rope Squirrel, probably Boehm's.

 

As for the Butterflies. Don't go there or you risk an obsession several times worse than birds.

But as a curious amateur I have tried to learn what I am finding in the parts of Africa that I visit. Uganda especially is a fantastic place for them. Butterfly books are huge as befits the number of species and consequently heavy on both the table and your pocket. Years ago I bought a copy (2nd hand) of Williams Field Guide which scratches the surface and the itch.

So from the top.

1. Green Patch Swallowtail. (It's a Swallowtail with a green patch. I love the methodology of some folks.)

2. It's an Acrae that does not have a common name. I could think of several, AFA being one!

Full title Acaea Amicitiae

3. This is a Hairstreak but I cannot see the upper side.

(There should be a law against people photographing things they cannot identify or is it EBC all over again?)

4. This is  a mix of "whites" all feeding on something obnoxious no doubt. I think I can see African Veined White and African Small White but there are Wanderers too.

5. Everyone should learn this one. "African Map" Butterfly.

6. Black-winged Acraea.

7. Brown Pansy. Another one that should prove easy to remember.

 

I might as well do the "Grasshopper". Band-winged or to give it its common name Locust..The wings are exposed to ward off predators so it obviously saw Emmy as a threat and not his boot as a possible mate. :P

 

 

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kittykat23uk

Yes, I think Emmy had said this one was carruthers:

 

P2200331 Carruther's mountain squirrel (Funisciurus carruthersi)

 

And the plain one @xelas posted which seems to have a more banded tail I think Emmy said was red-legged sun squirrel:

 

P2200340  red-legged sun squirrel (Heliosciurus rufobrachium)

 

and:

 

P2200405  red-legged sun squirrel (Heliosciurus rufobrachium)

 

 

 

but at the moment we are not sure of they aren't all Ruwenzori Sun Squirrel. 

 

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xelas
6 hours ago, Galana said:

(There should be a law against people photographing things they cannot identify or is it EBC all over again?)

 

Oh dear, and I have only wanted to show some beauties, and add some colours to my trip report :huh::mellow:B).

 

Thank you so much for your effort to educate me, and others. About butterflies, last year in Hungary I bought a book about them, opened it, and that was the last I saw it. No, I will not be succumbed !

 

Edited by xelas
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Galana
47 minutes ago, xelas said:

No, I will not be succumbed !

I agree. Lady Galana has book on Britain and Europe. cost £8.99. More than enough for me!

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xelas

Birding occupied the majority of our time at Broadbill Forest Camp. Each day Emmy took us to different places to show us what specific birds were there. Here below is a quick overview of those more attractive ones, shown in chronological order. 

 

948154001_UGN462.JPG.c86fbd3d33b6e102a5de3ffa799d7847.JPG

 

CHIN-SPOT BATIS

867292063_UGN461.JPG.6a4c686145ee4068db1ffe6827a4e0b2.JPG

 

DOHERTY’S BUSH-SHRIKE

632749794_UGN463.JPG.f2d820db009f91b828ad8247f34ca15d.JPG

 

GREY-THROATED BARBET

1142481823_UGN464.JPG.b88cb5d613e11b9af92d427c2acc3394.JPG

 

BROWN-CAPPED WEAVER

746111486_UGN465.JPG.8572b4753b01d68d3a898a02c284232c.JPG

 

85526068_UGN466.JPG.a5811e4077b01cac474f9070cb8360d9.JPG

 

BLACK-BILLED TURACO

1435247866_UGN467.JPG.84b1cf849f22ed4e252e19df04e21a6b.JPG

 

YELLOW WHITE-EYE

1476329958_UGN468.JPG.f283cda6f4796561c9689ded2933915c.JPG

 

WHITE-EYED SLATY FLYCATCHER

563489201_UGN469.JPG.8e003fdf3b395d25e53507ed8c5986af.JPG

 

HANDSOME FRANCOLIN

179995702_UGN470.JPG.120adf5d155e5ebdd35c9117ab79e92d.JPG

 

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xelas

1550869828_UGN472.JPG.1c12ac38967b640e5b4e15dfece3176b.JPG

 

YELLOW-WHISKERED GREENBUL

1929316894_UGN471.JPG.a87632631bac768157f7cb220aeb4867.JPG

 

SCALLY-BREASTED ILLADOPSIS

167027154_UGN473.JPG.1521457fa0aecf5f0ba82d1556d45ad6.JPG

 

BLACK BEE-EATER

1669290802_UGN474.JPG.fcc287741b2922d193f058b6bf5281fc.JPG

 

MOUNTAIN WAGTAIL

1419798084_UGN475.JPG.7cd9df2d83e6852776dce47ce4a02f01.JPG

 

NARINA TROGON

1171247274_UGN476.JPG.3b060dce0975222157d80f03d2f17f30.JPG

 

821358148_UGN477.JPG.24ab42419a8bee26f39dccc4a316f0c2.JPG

 

CINNAMON-CHESTED BEE-EATER

1428212537_UGN479.JPG.81765f5838149edfb06a71304168b11a.JPG

 

1943188306_UGN478.JPG.56997d1cc7fe4970fd263ce11ca4fb58.JPG

 

 

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xelas

And not to be missed, my favourite bird :D

 

COMMON BULBUL

1737767455_UGN480.JPG.1c6970179af1d81024674e36895737cd.JPG

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kittykat23uk

February 21st 2020 Ruhija 

 

After hearing so much about this camp and seeing some of the accommodation with it's sweeping vistas of the valley on the way in I was quite disappointed that my own tent did not have an impressive view. In fact quit a lot of the tents do not overlook the valley and instead have obscured views of trees and shrubs. I think even @Galana as a regular visitor was surprised ah how much the vegetation has grown up around the lodge. That said, there was still wildlife to be seen in and around the lodge. 

 

Fred had told me of the chameleons that live on the property so after breakfast we took a walk along the entrance road and sure enough, it wasn't long until I found our first one, a female:

 

49695397667_0d72d95910_b.jpgP2210020 Ruwenzori three-horned chameleon (Trioceros johnstoni) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

We headed out to bird the roads. Emmy had asked us if we wanted to pay park fees to visit a site for African Green Broadbill, but none of us were keen to be parted with our cash and so we accepted a dip on this sought-after bird.  Whilst searching for birds I encountered this pretty little bush cricket:

 

49694553058_51d087a424_b.jpgP2210028 Colourful bush Cricket by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

This is Emmy's favourite bird, he named his son after it. It's a difficult bird to see and we spent quite a lot of time with this individual:

 

49695394617_656aa84990_b.jpgP2210209 Doherty's bushshrike (Telophorus dohertyi) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49695088421_9a729b646e_b.jpgP2210246 Doherty's bushshrike (Telophorus dohertyi) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

Th birding continued with a very distant Green Pigeon:

 

49695393792_82ff993b81_b.jpgP2210259 African green pigeon (Treron calvus) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

And starlings

49694548888_0ba594c10b_c.jpgP2210287 Sharpe's starling (Poeoptera sharpii) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

This has to be one of the oddest barbets around:

49694548808_d49e2aa817_b.jpgP2210305 Grey-throated Barbet (Gymnobucco bonapartei) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49695085931_3372304172_b.jpgP2210551 Strange Weaver (Ploceus alienus) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49695085931_3372304172_b.jpgP2210551 Strange Weaver (Ploceus alienus) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49695390407_16c68bab73_b.jpgP2210620 Cinnamon-chested Bee-eater (Merops oreobates) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49695084541_fd4c675d62_b.jpgP2210656 handsome francolin (Pternistis nobilis) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

In the afternoon, back at the lodge, when everyone else was napping, the old boy who sings and tends the fire showed me to this beautiful male chameleon:

 

49694553653_cb49c33be8_b.jpgP2210005 Ruwenzori three-horned chameleon (Trioceros johnstoni) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49694553413_977eabb0ac_b.jpgP2210013 Ruwenzori three-horned chameleon (Trioceros johnstoni) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49695091856_e3edbe0fcd_b.jpgP2210055  White-eyed Slaty-flycatcher (Melaenornis fischeri) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49694552403_7be80bab86_b.jpgP2210070 yellow-bellied waxbill (Coccopygia quartinia) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

 Lucky for them it was still around and I could show them all on our way out for the afternoon drive:

 

49695090996_6bea5c264f_b.jpgP2210105 Ruwenzori three-horned chameleon (Trioceros johnstoni) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

and we also located the female

 

49694550928_b1bb5e857f_b.jpgP2210152 Ruwenzori three-horned chameleon (Trioceros johnstoni) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

More good birds awaited us in the afternoon

 

49695395087_078e30ce17_b.jpgP2210170 Mackinnon's Fiscal shrike (Lanius mackinnoni) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

Emmy seemed pretty fixated on these dusky crimson-wings..

 

49695394432_f09d685984_b.jpgP2210213 Dusky Crimsonwing (Cryptospiza jacksoni) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49695393647_04ff7d3bbb_c.jpgP2210275 slender-billed starling (Onychognathus tenuirostris) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49695087636_afd7ee4c47_b.jpgP2210383 (2) Handsome Francolin (Pternistis nobilis) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49694547733_bae4f49072_b.jpgP2210444 African Olive-pigeon (Columba arquatrix) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49695086381_96c337732a_c.jpgP2210490 (2) black-and-white-casqued hornbill (Bycanistes subcylindricus) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

 

 

 

Edited by kittykat23uk
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janzin

I must say that Uganda has never been on my list due to my non-interest in chimps and gorillas, but you are definitely selling it as a birding destination with all these great birds (and bird photos.)  Tons here that would be lifers, for sure. So perhaps Uganda gets added to the long list...

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Soukous
1 hour ago, janzin said:

So perhaps Uganda gets added to the long list...

 

Only perhaps ???? :o

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kittykat23uk
39 minutes ago, kilopascal said:

Loving the chameleon pics @kittykat23uk

 

Thanks, then you might like this too:

 

 

Edited by kittykat23uk
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janzin

wow I didn't know chameleons sound like cows! Or is it sheep? :D

 

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Galana
40 minutes ago, janzin said:

wow I didn't know chameleons sound like cows!

Yes. they have only hissed at me when  I go to pick them up! :lol:

Jo @kittykat23uk

6 hours ago, kittykat23uk said:

In fact quit a lot of the tents do not overlook the valley and instead have obscured views of trees and shrubs. I think even @Galana as a regular visitor was surprised ah how much the vegetation has grown up around the lodge. T

It is true but do please remember that even your Norfolk garden will grow quickly. Just imagine how fast stuff grows in a Montane Forest. There is  a balance to be struck between a natural forest ambience and a neatly trimmed municipal ornamental park. Emmy does his best to achieve this.. Last year I could see your tents (and the occupants antics)  from 'mine' and whilst a good trim is needed and in fact has now been done it has to be done sensitively. Remember it is for the wildlife as well as us!

 

BTW your Slender-billed Starlings in your post 394 look totally different to those in post 409. Are they related?;)

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kittykat23uk

22 February 2020

 

The day followed much the same pattern as previous with us heading out in the morning to bird the roads. 

 

49603177458_110e04ddb9_b.jpgIMG_20200222_092437 Ruhija by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49603935417_832250cefd_b.jpgIMG_20200222_092454 Ruhija by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49695144101_47f0080638_b.jpgP2220027 butterfly by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49695143426_0fed500d84_b.jpgP2220051 Grey-throated Tit-Flycatcher (Myioparus griseigularis) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49695101096_1f07f57380_b.jpgP2220114 Cassin's flycatcher (Muscicapa cassini) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49695100716_c08cfceb4f_b.jpgP2220149 Cassin's flycatcher (Muscicapa cassini) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49694560883_a713c65f89_b.jpgP2220195 Dusky-blue Flycatcher (Bradornis comitatus) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

We also found some Blue Monkeys

 

49695100416_de1d57fc93_b.jpgP2220299 blue monkey or diademed monkey (Cercopithecus mitis) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49695100061_e04b2c525a_b.jpgP2220367 blue monkey or diademed monkey (Cercopithecus mitis) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49695404907_afc61e2b65_b.jpgP2220397 blue monkey or diademed monkey (Cercopithecus mitis) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

We found nesting black bee-eaters and staked them out for quite a while

 

49694559888_319b502662_b.jpgP2220465 Black Bee-eater (Merops gularis) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49695098406_e3c175d8a1_b.jpgP2220898 Black Bee-eater (Merops gularis) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

Then turned our attention to looking for trogons. The Bar-tailed only put in a fleeting glimpse. 

 

49694559723_0f8d732c9c_b.jpgP2220527 Bar-tailed Trogon (Apaloderma vittatum) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49695404327_0f29c8d9fb_b.jpgP2220537 Butterflies by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49694558973_da567947a4_b.jpgP2220644 Scaly-breasted Illadopsis (Illadopsis albipectus) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49695403332_dc27c31b9f_b.jpgP2221000 African shrike-flycatcher or red-eyed shrike-flycatcher (Megabyas flammulatus) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

The wet weather was causing a lot of problems. this lorry got stuck, and a 4x4 with high ground clearance was definitely needed to get to and from Broadbill camp. Even then it was interesting driving..

 

49603177858_a6d834159e_c.jpg

IMG_20200222_155813 Lorry got stuck! by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

Back at the lodge for lunch and the requisite down-time and I had a nice visitor outside my tent:

 

49695143841_8c072f878b_b.jpgP2220035 Great Blue Turaco (Corythaeola cristata) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49695097516_641c9e193f_b.jpgP2220046 Great Blue Turaco (Corythaeola cristata) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

Birding around the lodge delivered a couple of goodies.

 

49695447987_2212467bd7_b.jpgP2220079 Tropical Boubou   Laniarius aethiopicus by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49695406527_ceba4ecb24_b.jpgP2220095 African paradise flycatcher (Terpsiphone viridis) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49695101296_412cfd790a_c.jpg

P2220101 African paradise flycatcher (Terpsiphone viridis) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

That night, we had arranged to go on a night drive. We spotted an African Wood Owl, some rather distant Senegal bush-babies and on the way beck we had a  nice, but fleeting sighting of a Side-striped Jackal that was close to Broadbill camp.

 

49695406092_f231006662_b.jpgP2220117 African Wood-owl   Strix woodfordii by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

Also on our night drive, we could just make out the distant glow of an active volcano,  it was absolutely amazing! 

 

I have some videos that I need to edit for this day too..

 

 

Edited by kittykat23uk
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Galana
On 4/2/2020 at 11:49 PM, xelas said:

a local man came to start the fire in the fireplace, and while taking care of it, he played different local musical instruments, and sing. 

This man, Gate keeper, nightwatchman and fire keeper is one of Emmy's success stories in providing employment for local people.

The man, with an unpronounceable name, is a reformed poacher who now gets wildlife friendly work and sees that the  NP can provide an income without law breaking. Win win!

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kittykat23uk

23 February 2020 Ruhija

 

Another day, and more beautiful views awaited us:

 

49603679651_29a68d3d19_b.jpgIMG_20200223_081514 Ruhija by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49603178218_b68b97de14_b.jpgIMG_20200223_081710 Ruhija by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

We birded the road, as was our custom, but not just birds awaited us:

 

49694602848_7c0b446fc2_b.jpgP2230041 Boehm's bush squirrel (Paraxerus boehmi) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49695140256_659318f804_b.jpgP2230234 (2) (2) P2230041 Boehm's bush squirrel (Paraxerus boehmi) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49695446322_07dd980004_b.jpgP2230099 Grey Cuckooshrike (Ceblepyris caesius) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49695445897_5ab59a881e_b.jpgP2230163 Banded Prinia (Prinia bairdii) Black-faced Prinia by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49695445022_67fe0c1c00_b.jpgP2230267 Olive Woodpecker (Dendropicos griseocephalus) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49695444237_8609d2185e_c.jpg

P2230315 (3) Blue-headed Sunbird (Cyanomitra alinae) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49695444127_d6e68b54f6_b.jpgP2230324 (2) Blue-headed Sunbird (Cyanomitra alinae) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49695444037_afb8229a38_b.jpgP2230366 P2230279 Olive Woodpecker (Dendropicos griseocephalus) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

 

The star bird of the day undoubtedly goes the this very cooperative Narina Trogon that, once Emmy had his attention, posed very nicely for us for a significant period of time:

 

49694599533_a9d9a9d6f8_b.jpgP2230395 (2) Narina Trogon   Apaloderma narina by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49695443717_af39ec09d2_b.jpgP2230405 Narina Trogon   Apaloderma narina by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49694599058_db737a2c68_b.jpgP2230626 Narina Trogon   Apaloderma narina by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49695442982_6edabd13dd_b.jpgP2230646 (2) Narina Trogon   Apaloderma narina by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

Finally we left it to go back to whatever it was doing as we carried on:

 

49695138066_4b39a5e798_b.jpgP2230654 Mackinnon's Shrike (Fiscal)   Lanius mackinnoni by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49695137866_2d3a3a7dcf_b.jpgP2230683 Yellow-whiskered Greenbul   Eurillas latirostris by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

Whilst we chased after butterflies

 

49695137591_ed199d9063_b.jpgP2230697 Acraea Amicitiae butterfly by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49695137376_a062ee0195_b.jpgP2230715 Common fairy hairstreak (Hypolycaena hatita hatita) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

We collared this bird:

 

49695137151_317126aeab_b.jpgP2230793 Rwenzori (Collared) Apalis (Oreolais ruwenzorii) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

Black and White colobus are so photogenic, who can resist them against this backdrop of lichen-covered vines and mountain ridges?

 

49695441972_5b1cc38dbe_b.jpgP2230825 by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

Personally I think they are worthy of "honorary lemur" status, on account of how plushy they are:

 

49694597433_b4188576d4_c.jpg

P2230834 Black-and-white colobuses by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49695441482_2c72cb4172_c.jpg

P2230896 Black-and-white colobuses by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49694596983_2d8503125d_c.jpg

P2230943 Black-and-white colobuses by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

Soon though, our attention refocused towards our feathered friends

 

49695441072_400fa20ffd_b.jpgP2230961  mountain oriole (Oriolus percivali) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49694596343_54160dc9e1_b.jpgP2231012 Cinnamon-chested Bee-eater (Merops oreobates) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49694595888_bf629ae15d_b.jpgP2231086 Cinnamon-chested Bee-eater (Merops oreobates) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49695134601_3a49f298a8_c.jpg

P2231126 (2) Yellow-whiskered Greenbul   Eurillas latirostris by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

We returned to the lodge for lunch. We were not the only ones eating. From the balcony a hoard of ravenous caterpillars seemed intent on defoliating everything in view!

 

49695447777_9dcb4a628f_b.jpgP2230006 catterpillar by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

In the afternoon I tried a different view, opting to camp out at one of the other tents that was unoccupied. 

 

49695445667_52e80ca6ba_b.jpgP2230170 Variable Sunbird (Cinnyris venustus) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49695141706_d44d98f26e_b.jpgP2230098 (2) (2) golden-breasted bunting (Emberiza flaviventris) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

I had been hoping for better views of Black-billed Turaco but sadly they kept a low profile. 

 

We were out again in the afternoon, but we saw very little:

 

49694601023_821ac9118b_b.jpgP2230205 Levaillant's Cuckoo (Clamator levaillantii) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49695139771_7635ac67ef_b.jpgP2230281 Regal Sunbird (Cinnyris regius) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

I mentioned about the rain, here is a mobile phone video of the drive to Broadbill Camp in the rain. It is not for the faint-hearted even in a 4 x 4!

 

49612787388_22793a62a2_b.jpg

VID_20200221_120352 Treacherous drive to Broadbill Forest Camp by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

Even worse when you encounter traffic coming the other way!

 

49613307516_781eef97db_b.jpgVID_20200221_120942 Treacherous drive to Broadbill Forest Camp by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

We met another group of visitors who were staying at the lodge. Their travel company had supplied two minibuses for the group. One was 4WD the other was not. One lady was particularly shaken up at being in the second minibus as they had a very harrowing experience on those muddy tracks, so much so that they had to abandon the minibus down the road and walk the rest of the distance. We could not fathom why the other minibus just did not make two trips to rescue the other group. It all seemed rather odd at the time.

 

We ourselves had an rather heated encounter with another larger vehicle, that was blocking our way into the lodge. There is work going on to build another lodge close to Broadbill Camp, so this heavy traffic, coupled with unseasonable rains, is really degrading this track. Emmy finally managed to "persuade" them to give way to us, but not without a very lengthy discourse.. 

 

I am aware that as we left there was some work going on to try and fix this road, perhaps Fred knows more on the current state of the track? 

 

and Fred, are you sure that the Broadbill Camp team have trimmed up the garden or did those caterpillars do all the work? :blink: :D

Edited by kittykat23uk
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Soukous

Love the Great Blue Turaco - I want one

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Safaridude

@xelas

 

Very late to this party, but what a great, comprehensive report!

 

Is there a practical way to get to Mabamba at first light?  Also, did you see any papyrus gonalek there? 

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Galana
1 hour ago, Soukous said:

Love the Great Blue Turaco - I want one

To get your own GBT you need:-

 A Norfolk Turkey. Apply three coats of Sky blue paint. Now teach it to fly!

 

31 minutes ago, Safaridude said:

Is there a practical way to get to Mabamba at first light?  Also, did you see any papyrus gonalek there? 

There is  a Lodge about 10 minutes from the boat 'dock' but why would you want to? It's easy enough to get lost out there in broad daylight without adding to the problem. I doubt there would be any boat available and am not sure of what 'office hours' they keep. We were out on the water at 9.30. Maybe two hours earlier would have been better. Who knows?

Sadly we never got to grips with Papyrus Gonalek despite hearing them calling at various known haunts.

 

@kittykat23uk

Well the caterpillars certain helped as they are designed to do but some of the larger shrubs/trees are gone by more expedient means. The problem is of course if you remove too much too quickly you end up denuding the soil of essential nutrient. I have no updates on the state of the track.

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kittykat23uk
40 minutes ago, Safaridude said:

@xelas

 

Very late to this party, but what a great, comprehensive report!

 

Is there a practical way to get to Mabamba at first light?  Also, did you see any papyrus gonalek there? 

 

Sure there is if you leave early enough and if you are so inclined. . No we dipped papyrus gonolek. 

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xelas
On 3/12/2020 at 10:59 PM, xelas said:

Close by is Nkima Forest Lodge - http://nkimaforestlodge.com.

 

@Safaridude thanks for your kind words. This is the name of the lodge that is close to Mabamba Swamp entry point.

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Galana

Before we leave Ruhija for our next leg to Lake Mulehe perhaps a few words on the area may help those who have yet to go get  an idea of where we are.

The attached map of Andy Roberts will give you some idea but in fact the area really starts at the town of Kabale to the east of the map. Please note the map is Copyright. I attach it simply to show how compact an area the last two weeks of the trip occupied.

1-Ishasha164.jpg.774db509ac25d291c66c777a4c0c8e21.jpg

Locally known as "The Kigezi Highlands" , from the eponymous local district of Kigezi, the area is 5100 sq km and at an altitude of between 1,500 and 2759. It receives around 1000mm rain per year so is lush and green (and has lots of Swamps for me as well as lush forest!:lol:) The area is extremely fertile from the volcanic soils so it is no surprise that the local people are agriculturalists.

577976816_NkuringoBwindisouth..JPG.46ac5a3a786e0f968e0225b3858a0f9c.JPG

Bwindi is of course the main focus and what most folks associate with this area of the South West of Uganda.

Hard up against the border to two other famous, or infamous, countries, Rwanda and the Democratic Republic of Congo where there have been incidents in the fairly distant past. However the publicised 'kidnapping and ransom' of last year was a local put up job that failed.  Having said that the 'victims' really only had their lodge to blame for being in the wrong place at the wrong time.

The area is safe and the people friendly.

The population comprise three main groups, the Bakiga who created the distinctive terraced hillsides and their neighbours the Bafumbira who farm the volcanic plains around Kisoro at the foot of the Virunga volcanoes.

Those who know a little kiSwahili will know the collective for a tribe is "Wa" and in Uganda it is "Ba" hence the two tribes above comprise Makiga and Mfumbira just as I am a Mzungu and part of the Wazungu 'tribe' of all foreigners and not just those of us of one pigmentation.

The third group is the smallest, in both senses, the BaTwa. Sadly they are the most troubled too. Known to the west more commonly as "Pygmies" this term is no longer in polite use.

 

Historically they were Hunter-gatherers in the regions forests and their homeland has been massively reduced by agricultural clearance for many years over recent millennia as the agriculturalists moved in.. Whilst their traditional way of life was inevitably doomed it was brought to a sudden halt as recently as  1992 with the desperate attempt to save remnant forests by "gazetting" both Bwindi and Mgahing as National Parks. Echuya Forest, straddling the main Kabale-Kisoro highway is one remaining area not yet a National Park but it no doubt will follow.

In 1992 both BaTwa and any encroaching farmers were evicted and sadly now subsist as landless squatters along the forest edges.

Many lodges will organise traditional village visits for 'tourists' but these are rather sorry affairs much like others for other tribes. (Masai in Kenya/Tanzania and Himba in Namibia spring to mind).

Much better in my opinion to support one of the many charitable organisations that are doing their best to find ways of providing employment and thus a creating a more worthwhile and meaningful existence for these unfortunate  people.

Edited by Galana
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