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xelas

Nope, those were rooms on arrival and departure nights. To answer your other Q, we do share the same room at home and abroad, but when travelling preference goes to twin. Camera is always under control!

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Zim Girl

Great start - so much to look forward to in this report, and can't wait!

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PeterHG

Excellent start to the trip report. Looking forward to more!

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xelas
Posted (edited)

IMPERIAL BOTANICAL GARDENS

 

 

As our trip started on Monday, we have had one full day in front of us, and what better way to spent it then doing some walking and birding inside Imperial Botanical Gardens, which is located very close to AGH. The weather was perfect, sunny yet not too hot or humid. Zvezda and me did felt tired, for our overnight flight was not among the most comfortable ones even for economy class, and with only having 3 hours in proper bed. But Fred would not accept any excuses, birding is a serious activity!

 

Gardens are located on the shores of Lake Victoria; no reservation is needed. The entry fee for foreign visitors was 10.000 UGX (2,70 USD). The park is large enough for the whole day of exploring, especially if you are interested in birds. Beside birds, monkeys are numerous, and some smaller mammals and lizards.

 

Our main interest was to “tick and click” as many bird species as possible. We were very successful; I have counted over 60 different bird species … and a couple of hundreds of bulbuls. 

 

Bulbuls were everywhere, and soon our group has invented a few acronyms for them: AFB being the most often used, but this one the rest of our group likes more: ISAIMB – If Spotted by Alex It Must be a Bulbul. What can I do, every birder has to start somewhere!

 

COMMON BULBUL

454743256_UGN010.JPG.63dbfdbab3beb54e9071f1ed126b4e57.JPG

A couple (!) of other larger and easier to spot and ID birds

 

BLACK-AND-WHITE SHRIKE-FLYCATCHER

281763182_UGN011.JPG.7a3adbd646b4420052dd9740253b8e9f.JPG

 

 

RED-EYED DOVE

1615168749_UGN012.JPG.113538e2c62ea1c8bf5ec1aad84bd5bf.JPG

 

 

Edited by xelas

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xelas
Posted (edited)

Ladies have their sharp eyes not tuned only for birds, but also for monkeys. 

 

111068392_UGN013.JPG.a10d06b9c693bcb2f03d6aa38801031c.JPG

 

Vervet monkeys have been seen all over Uganda; some do not like them, as they can be quite cheeky, and has “sticky fingers”, however as with humans also with monkeys, kids are just adorable.

 

VERVET MONKEY

 

189733114_UGN014.JPG.8e62173d72e755f5912f9e00485484c2.JPG

 

1645802451_UGN015.JPG.fbf621d9fad8d1c32b9ce3afee64a716.JPG

 

289384387_UGN016.JPG.f29d904edb99710b34801bff73ac4301.JPG

 

 

Monkey with a red tail … it must be a Red-tailed monkey?! Yes, but it also has several different names, like Schmidt’s red-tailed monkey, Red-tailed guenon,  Schmidt’s guenon, or the most elaborate one: Black-cheeked white-nosed monkey!!

 

RED-TAILED MONKEY

 

1005980601_UGN017.JPG.8c682df9f9d298c3175636f46e47f9bb.JPG

 

1149373449_UGN018.JPG.6a60fa7a0645a607197449730cb384ff.JPG

 

 

Another species that we have seen also in other parts was Black-and-white colobus. Aptly named, for sure. Belongs to Old World monkeys. They were more shy than vervets.

 

BLACK-AND-WHITE COLOBUS

 

1601648190_UGN019.JPG.353e9d6d5634381200f01c2cd68a287a.JPG

 

1746476310_UGN020.JPG.b510b9e3dd69c73284a2f5f7743580e1.JPG

 

1045419145_UGN021.JPG.8d2d5eb84980500dd555a7255f936f85.JPG

 

2129437700_UGN022.JPG.9c908911582c6ab74170340cf5c428d3.JPG

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by xelas

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xelas
Posted (edited)

Enough of mammals, said Fred, we are here for birds! And they must be somewhere up in the trees, isn’t it so, Alex?!

 

848412555_UGN023.JPG.6a90b1b2568dcaf7128d9d8d2736713d.JPG

 

Not really! Sometimes they do like to be on the grounds, with other residents of the park.

 

LITTLE SPARROWHAWK

1986784940_UGN024.JPG.3fc7ad5346fc9fbe3dec2cd0f49c9992.JPG

 

MARABOU STORK

2083808722_UGN025.JPG.08979ec7f0c795a97a345bb7b653e940.JPG

 

STRIPED GROUND SQUIRREL

321419002_UGN026.JPG.f49bb1df8772df8c1e7855dc25dd2168.JPG

 

 

Speaking of grounds, Imperial Botanical Gardens are lush and green, as expected from such in the tropical climate. It is also very well maintained, cleaned daily, at least it was such on the day of our visit. Locals likes to visit it, and it is a place where groups can be seen either doing their religion’s stuff, or playing football (that is soccer for readers from the other side of the pond).

 

1903006172_UGN027.JPG.eeb6ad342172eaa1dc872e9130589280.JPG

 

1178846189_UGN028.JPG.afd86f7eb030e47dd6474cefc2f36802.JPG

 

1921445275_UGN029.JPG.ebcb0c7393a035ef6919f1fc269709ab.JPG

Edited by xelas

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xelas
Posted (edited)

We have left Alex looking into the trees for birds. And he has found some (and not the AFB, would you believe?!). Here are Zvezda’s photos of proof.

 

GREAT BLUE TURACO

242190420_UGN030.JPG.bccb55d8d18446312146f020354478dc.JPG

 

EASTERN GREY PLAINTAIN-EATER

1547731218_UGN031.JPG.5b19f1a2a0d05bd087d91dbb8a74ab6e.JPG

 

BLACK-AND-WHITE-CASQUED HORNBILL

 

1707529572_UGN032.JPG.3d5c8b247eec553192c36ed3bcdee744.JPG

 

CROWNED HORNBILL

 

2096449093_UGN033.JPG.6e62a88d8b15eca9a1f23e846d258188.JPG

 

WHITE-THROATED BEE-EATER

1589903583_UGN034.JPG.7b0be16799a46b25bb90faa7958aaeab.JPG

 

Birds were many, but taking (good) photos of them was a difficult task. They will be presented in larger numbers in Big Year 2020 thread. To show how difficult is to spot even a larger animal in the dense undergrowth, this lizard was only found by sharp eyes belonging to Emmy.

 

SOUTHERN TREE AGAMA

1023344595_UGN035.JPG.c5a7ffc4cb50de6b493cffb798210c92.JPG

Edited by xelas

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xelas

Park is bordering to the famous Lake Victoria. Largest lake in Africa, and main source of water for river Nile, it is shared between Uganda and Tanzania, and even Kenya is bordering to it. Its massive water body helps to keep the temperatures within acceptable limits … but more so helps a cold Nile Special.

 

1925736595_UGN036.JPG.c3cb2bad0562af73db4a69793b0cfeff.JPG

 

1696532387_UGN037.JPG.feaab1e2e23e92829eb23092923d07b2.JPG

 

977811002_UGN038.JPG.122ca07dcd84a1809ecf2a2f2c27a8ad.JPG

 

Fishing the lake is not only reserved for humans; this Clawless otter got his (her?) lunch. They might be clawless but they surely have sharp teeth.

 

1862027110_UGN039.JPG.fb79bee3b8195395f3ffe9a65c992413.JPG

 

225625873_UGN040.JPG.c21801c967b2d5837d71e58d17e3d1d2.JPG

 

 

It was a pleasant day in the nature, with many more birds seen and photographed. On our way home Emmy took us to a nearby shopping mall where we have indulged in a very good mango extravaganza (I think that was the name of the iced milkshake).

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Galana
Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, xelas said:

BLACK-AND-WHITE CRESTED FLYCATCHER

Actually Black and White Shrike Flycatcher. Bias musicus. OK for your TR but watch out on your BY.

Zvezda certainly learned about the camera position.

 

Mango Madness was the Ice.

Edited by Galana
Corrected text.

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kittykat23uk
Posted (edited)

Before we got to the botanical gardens Emmy heard some Meyer's Parrots calling from  a small green space in the city, he asked if we wanted to stop and look for them but we all thought we would see them later on, so we carried on. Perhaps this was a mistake? Time will tell...

 

Anyone familiar with Kirstenbosch Botanical Gardens  in South Africa or Kew  in London may be surprised by the Royal Botanical Gardens of Entebbe. My impression was one of mature trees, rambling shrubs and open woodland, bordering the beautiful lake-shore. It felt more of a birder's paradise than a botanist's one, lacking in those beautiful rainbow carpets of daisies or carefully manicured borders of proteas and other colourful flora. But the birds and other wildlife don't seem to mind and we saw plenty to keep us occupied. 

 

A correction to the above post first, those otters. Emmy thought that they were African Clawless, but on closer inspection and having consulted some mammal experts I have concluded that they are actually Spotted Necked Otters. 

 

Since I am not doing a Big Year, this report will have to showcase most of my photos. Sorry for any doubling up! I'm sure you will all be quite disappointed by this news! 

 

49636123676_4c83801903_b.jpgP2090512 (2)  vervet monkey (Chlorocebus pygerythrus) babies by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

Why is it that monkeys are always so judgemental of us human beings, this ones holds up a plastic bin bag, as if to accusingly say, "is this yours?"

 

49636400517_d9d3533a3d_b.jpgP2090612  vervet monkey (Chlorocebus pygerythrus) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49635596753_f60311a567_b.jpgP2090710 Schmidt's red-tailed monkey  Cercopithecus ascanius schmidti by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

So I said I only had three targets; well not strictly true, as I was very much looking forward to clapping my eyes on one of these beauties:

 

49635596033_6bc6fe64e3_b.jpgP2090790 Great Blue Turaco (Corythaeola cristata) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49636397812_11e585ec45_b.jpgP2090878 Great Blue Turaco (Corythaeola cristata) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49636119901_e4dd2dbabf_b.jpgP2090904 blue-throated brown sunbird (Cyanomitra cyanolaema) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

Sorry Woody, this perch is taken! 

 

49636119451_a321fde059_c.jpg

P2091023 Woodland Kingfisher (Halcyon senegalensis) Grey Woodpecker (Dendropicos goertae) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49636396637_ddba8900c6_c.jpg

P2091093 (2) Crowned Hornbill (Lophoceros alboterminatus) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49636118636_ebb8fd9872_b.jpgP2091190 Red-chested Sunbird (Cinnyris erythrocercus) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49636117796_50b82fae5f_b.jpgP2091353 Black-and-white colobus monkey by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49636375802_d0999933ae_c.jpg

P2091474 Black-and-white colobus monkey by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49636116931_911316d24b_b.jpgP2091552 Striped Ground Squirrel – Euxerus erythropus. by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

This was a very special bird too, another one I hoped we would see:

 

49635591923_b56413ce4f_b.jpgP2091650 (2) Ross's Turaco (Musophaga rossae) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49636125856_081d0c3eb6_b.jpgP2091596 (2) Ross's Turaco (Musophaga rossae) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49635590983_fd82ed2e8c_b.jpgP2091744 (2) Black-and-white-casqued Hornbills, Bycanistes subcylindricus, by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49636115366_7d129ff2f1_b.jpgP2091837  little sparrowhawk (Accipiter minullus) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49636392337_10675cc905_b.jpgP2091887  western cattle egret (Bubulcus ibis) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49635589898_f395686bf8_b.jpgP2091966  marabou stork (Leptoptilos crumenifer) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

I'm not a kiddy person, I am a bunny person, but these kids were quite cute, considering the lack of fur..

 

49636391487_7df41a5838_b.jpgP2092000 Ugandan kids by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49635588773_29f0fde05f_b.jpgP2092071 wood sandpiper (Tringa glareola) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49636389832_377e9fa502_b.jpgP2092249  marabou stork (Leptoptilos crumenifer) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49635586443_6be49ed3dd_b.jpgP2092343 Diederik Cuckoo (Chrysococcyx caprius) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49636387312_4dba7410a4_b.jpgP2092422 (2) African Openbill (Anastomus lamelligerus) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49635584058_8d9874aa25_c.jpg

P2092463 Ugandan kid by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49636385827_3452a56b77_b.jpgP2092507  common greenshank (Tringa nebularia) & wood sandpiper (Tringa glareola) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49635583283_509549c432_b.jpgP2092524 dragonfly by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49635582958_dc97016926_b.jpgP2092528   spur-winged lapwing or spur-winged plover (Vanellus spinosus) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49636383637_b59d3585af_b.jpgP2092685 (2) spotted-necked otter (Hydrictis maculicollis) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49636383417_fca1edf637_b.jpgP2092704 black-winged stilt (Himantopus himantopus) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49516524448_01723b4c9c_b.jpgIMG_20200209_131200 by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49516534673_0a8afc7042_h.jpgIMG_20200209_131254 by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

A stop for lunch, but no cool libation for me, cider is hard to come by in Uganda..

 

49517049681_6d1418c69b_b.jpgIMG_20200209_132314 by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49516529598_a0f656f468_b.jpgIMG_20200209_132321 by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49517060596_fb2b1e8dd4_b.jpgIMG_20200209_132330 by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49635580668_bf360673b3_b.jpgP2092729 pied kingfisher (Ceryle rudis) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49635579918_cc9588ef6e_b.jpgP2092766  yellow-billed kite (Milvus aegyptius) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49635579558_fcff821956_b.jpgP2092775 Woodland Kingfisher (Halcyon senegalensis) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49636381472_8ff422d3c3_b.jpgP2092776 Blue-cheeked Bee-eater (Merops persicus) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49635578923_66f3c6dd05_b.jpgP2092792 Agama Lizard by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

Another superb bird that we saw! 

49636103066_4d80df5d55_b.jpgP2092867 (2) Superb Sunbird (Cinnyris superbus) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49636102926_dce6f8806f_c.jpg

P2092887 (2) Superb Sunbird (Cinnyris superbus) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

I have no idea about this one! Is it a canary or a female weaver?!

 

49636380652_79b5b87bba_c.jpg

P2092936 (2)  ID needed by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49636380597_64dd15b0ce_b.jpgP2092962  bronze mannikin or bronze munia (Lonchura cucullata) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49635577618_aacdc08a7a_b.jpgP2092995 Vieillot's black weaver (Ploceus nigerrimus) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

The goodies kept coming at the Botanical Gardens! We lost Fred at this point.. 

 

49636101641_27c2a97689_b.jpgP2093067 (2) African grey parrot (Psittacus erithacus) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

Some of the locals came up to me and practically begged me to photograph this caterpillar that they had found:

 

49636379472_957a21c5f8_b.jpgP2093103 Hairy caterpillar by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

Returning to the AGH, there were still birds to find before the sun went down...

 

49635576483_67315d0b19_b.jpgP2093131 Northern Black-flycatcher (Melaenornis edolioides) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49635576153_bd60c694e0_c.jpg

P2093138 Red-chested Sunbird (Cinnyris erythrocercus) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49636100156_63b9643b83_b.jpgP2093155 Red-chested Sunbird (Cinnyris erythrocercus) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49635575463_b1c6e7317c_b.jpgP2093158 African thrush or West African thrush (Turdus pelios) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49636377742_5affc54868_b.jpgP2093213 Red-billed Firefinch (Lagonosticta senegala) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49636377122_8eca8ed31c_c.jpg

P2093267 Speckled Mousebird (Colius striatus) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49636376757_832084e839_b.jpgP2093282 African harrier-hawk, harrier hawk, or gymnogene (Polyboroides typus) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49635573078_d125c8f4bd_b.jpgP2093347 Red-chested Sunbird (Cinnyris erythrocercus) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

 

 

 

Edited by kittykat23uk

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xelas

Thanks Fred for catching this typo. On BY it is correctly ID.

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kittykat23uk

A quick note on my photographic equipment. I was shooting with my Olympus OMD EM1 MK2 and Panasonic 100-400 lens the vast majority of the time. The following exceptions applied:

 

1. Chimps/Gorillas - swapped out the 100-400 with my old 50-200 non SWD 4/3 F2.8-3.5 attached with the MMF-3 adapter. This worked well for the chimps, but badly for the gorillas- too slow to focus in what was a much darker understorey- to the extent that I had to switch to manual focus at times. I should have bitten the bullet and upgraded to either the 12-100 F4, the 12-40 F2.8 pro or maybe the 40-150 F2.8 pro. Any of those would probably have done a better job. I also took a 14-42 4/3 kit lens, but that was way too slow for the gorillas and I quickly replaced it with the 50-200. cameraphone shots were even worse. 

 

2. Wide angle shots/landscape and some candid people shots were mostly taken with my Huaweii Mate 20 Pro phone. A few were taken with the aforementioned kit lens on my EM1 mk1.

 

3. Video- mostly shot with my M1 Mk2 and 100-400 lens, again exceptions applied when shooting gorillas/chimps and some candid/scenic stuff.

 

4. Night photography- we did very few night drives, but I used an FL50R flash at times again with the M1 MK2 & 100-400.  

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TonyQ

What an amazing collection of birds from the botanical gardens.

Is it so big that you drive around it? (Seeing picture of you vehicle)

Good to see the otters.

The guest house looks very good

Excellent photos from all contributors 

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kittykat23uk

It's quite spread out and some of the tracks were flooded. 

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xelas

Our equipment consisted of Nikon D7200 + Nikon 200-500 f/5.6, Nikon D610 + Nikon 300D f/4 + TC14 and Sony RX100II. Some photos were also done by Huawei phone. I did have 24-120 f/4 but have never put it on D610.

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Soukous

I'm starting to understand the dynamic now. Zvezda has the long lens and takes pictures of wildlife, Alex carries the spare equipment and follows Zvezda around taking pictures of her taking photos. :rolleyes:

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Galana
14 hours ago, kittykat23uk said:

It's funny we all have more or less the same shot of that pole sitting weaver.

1-DSCN5309-001.JPG.f64530d529e912c8b2ac2191ed20abcf.JPG

Alex 'suggested' Holob's Golden. I think it is Golden-backed (Jackson's). female of course.

If we are talking 'equipment' I carry the humble Nikkon P900. I hate the viewfinder and the electronic zoom that requires what seems like 24 hours notice to extend but at least I don't get a hernia lugging the thing around.

 

@TonyQ The gardens are quite large. 40 Hectares about. Established in 1898 and hence quite mature and natural but most specimen trees are named. There are no formal 'gardens as such. Cars are permitted at the gatekeeper's discretion. Lakeside tracks are currently flooded due to high water in the lake.

A visit should be a must for all birders.

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Soukous
1 minute ago, Galana said:

I hate the viewfinder and the electronic zoom that requires what seems like 24 hours notice to extend but at least I don't get a hernia lugging the thing around.

 

Agree with all of those reasons. But Zvezda has Alex to get hernias for her. :ph34r:

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Soukous
3 minutes ago, Galana said:

A visit should be a must for all birders.

 

it is on the list

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xelas
3 hours ago, Galana said:

Alex 'suggested' Holob's Golden.

 Did I? I mean, suggested. As with those birds that all looks the same to my untrained eye, I am only guessing :D.

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Galana

 

20 minutes ago, xelas said:

Did I? I mean, suggested.

Actually now that I check back you guessed right. See! You can do it.

D72_1921
Golden-backed Weaver female: dark eye, red legs

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kittykat23uk
57 minutes ago, Galana said:

 

Actually now that I check back you guessed right. See! You can do it.

D72_1921
Golden-backed Weaver female: dark eye, red legs

 

OK I'm confused, is it Holob's or Golden-backed (Jackson's)? 

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Galana
5 hours ago, kittykat23uk said:

Golden-backed (Jackson's)? 

I think.:P

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PeterHG
On 3/10/2020 at 8:44 PM, kittykat23uk said:

I was shooting with my Olympus OMD EM1 MK2 and Panasonic 100-400 lens

You obviously used the combo well. I have the same camera, but with the zuiko 300 f4. A great birding lens, but I did miss the zoom in Africa, so there your Panasonic was definitely a better option. 

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xelas
Posted (edited)

MABAMBA SWAMP

 

 

Mabamba Swamp is home to one of the “Holy Trinity” of Uganda: chimp, gorilla and … shoebill. It is located close to either Kampala or Entebbe, and as such a must stop for about every visitor to Uganda (unless they come only for a few days to do the gorilla trekking).

 

As Monday is a working day, Emmy started very early. It became his habit, to force us on having a quick breakfast and coming back not before sunset. We were lucky to be on equator thus the day only has 12 hours.

 

The shortest way from Entebbe to Mabamba is by using the ferry. From Kampala or Entebbe the easiest route is via the Nakiwogo landing site in Entebbe where you take a 10 minutes ferry crossing to Kasanje landing and from there drive for about 20 minutes to Mabamba. It is a small ferry so one needs to be in the line early. The line of vehicles in front of us was already long, with several trucks. So when the boarding started, Emmy realized we will not get on the ferry. So he decided not to wait for the next ferry ride (about 1 hour). Driving around the lake was OK while we were still on tarmac, but once we got onto the red dirt roads, speed was down, and African massage started. 

 

Arriving at Mabamba Swamp, first iwe have had to “pay the lady”. This was done by Fred, as he is used to handle large amounts with ease. Although also he was surprised by the rise in the entry fee (25.000 UGX per foreign visitor) and boat (150.000 UGX). He must have passed as a local the last time there, as locals only pays 10.000 UGX entry fee.

 

1298704583_UGN041.JPG.2a54cdaf4ac147c95b9303d53de1cd24.JPG

 

2114133090_UGN042.JPG.6e2b67da900b9be4b3cc81edfb282d55.JPG

Edited by xelas

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