Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Galana
5 hours ago, Soukous said:
21 hours ago, kittykat23uk said:

who would go to Uganda and not want to see it's most iconic primates, the Chimps and Gorillas

 

Me !

 

1 hour ago, janzin said:

Me too

They say confession is good for the soul. I did not contradict @kittykat23uk Jo in either of her statements above about Chimps. (Mummy always told me never to contradict  a Lady:P ) BUT now it can be told.

Maybe my aversion to Chimps stems from the early Tarzan films of my youth or those TV adverts for PG Tips. but I cannot abide them and have never paid good money to go and see them in Uganda or anywhere else!

I have seen them in the wild when birding as this example from Budongo shows:-

2009_0105Frd20100.JPG.a711814316b5e24c20b21074057f94fa.JPG

I addition to Chimpanzees my antipathy spreads to Olive/Yellow/Chacma Baboons  (Uggh!) and Vervet monkeys. (Yuk!)  I have a Zambian Lodge owner friend who says the best way to view Baboons is through the sights of his rifle!

However I don't have this feeling for all Primates and have spent much time with my other cousin the Mountain Gorilla and firmly believe that this is one of the finest Wildlife Experiences one can have.

And I am fine with other monkeys too. The lovely l'Hoest's is a firm favourite and I was thrilled last trip, 2018, to find my first Brazza's when birding Semuliki Hot springs. Pattas? Red tails etc? Bring them on. I even harbour a wish to see the Chimp's cousin the Bonobo. I even love seeing Gelada and Hamadryas and would love to find a Mandrill one day which I am sure shows what  a mixed up old g*t I really am.

 

More Bulbuls please Alex. (You snook that Chestnt Wattle-eye past me.)

Edited by Galana
amended text.
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 560
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • xelas

    168

  • kittykat23uk

    115

  • Galana

    113

  • Soukous

    51

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Thinking of our time at Mweya Lodge reminds me of another event that should not pass unrecorded. There is a band of Banded Mongoose to be found in the grounds that can give rise to some unusual e

Boat with Jo and Zvezda took a closer position, but the sun was behind the bird. We have stopped at a distance yet the sun position was more favourable. Then the clicking started. OK, clicking started

As the title is suggesting, there were 7 specials for Zvezda and me during this trip. As the number is not 5, the tale is not about the five travellers in our group; although all of them are special,

Posted Images

Soukous
6 minutes ago, Galana said:

I have a Zambian Lodge owner friend who says the best way to view Baboons is through the sights of his rifle!

 

could that be Herman?

Link to post
Share on other sites
Soukous
7 minutes ago, Galana said:

Olive/Yellow/Chacma Baboons  (Uggh!)

 

Agree absolutely

Link to post
Share on other sites
Galana
5 minutes ago, Soukous said:

could that be Herman?

No. Although it is something I am sure that Herman would endorse wholeheartedly. It was noticed that Baboons gave Wildlife Camp a very wide berth during our stay.

Link to post
Share on other sites
kittykat23uk

Such a shame that some people have such an aversion to these charismatic animals. To be honest I have gone years without Chimps/Gorillas going to the top of my list of must see animals. If it hadn't been for Ethiopia falling through and  @Galana and @xelas being amenable to me joining them i probably wouldn't have had the inclination to visit Uganda or see our cousins. But I'm so glad that I did, it was really worthwhile and I would recommend it to everyone to give it a go. 

 

Well looks like @xelas have already shown most of the special birds we saw in the afternoon and as he mentions, the light was not the greatest. Nevertheless I was very excited to catch my first view of this beauty, the Black Bee-eater, although we got better views later in the trip:

 

49640938101_3d6205f25d_b.jpgP2111426 black bee-eater (Merops gularis) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

A lot of patience and persistence paid off with a very secretive white-spotted flufftail 

 

49640938056_11896c8be3_b.jpgP2111467 White-spotted Flufftail (Sarothrura pulchra) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49641213167_dd280430bf_b.jpgP2111487 White-spotted Flufftail (Sarothrura pulchra) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

Okay @xelas has already shown the following birds but here are some of my shots for comparison. This first one doesn't look very chestnut does it? well it's sexually dimorphic and named for the female which is indeed a chestnut colour. 

 

49641212972_fedd5af569_b.jpgP2111515 Chestnut Wattle-eye by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49640937481_b16892598a_c.jpg

P2111549 Hairy-breasted Barbet (Tricholaema hirsuta) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49640414733_2099b69403_c.jpg

P2111582 Hairy-breasted Barbet (Tricholaema hirsuta) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49641212137_11be881951_b.jpgP2111630 Uganda crested mangabey (Lophocebus ugandae) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49640414148_247363f234_b.jpgP2111677 yellow-crested woodpecker (Chloropicus xantholophus) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49640413988_ef7b6ee9b9_b.jpgP2111687 African dusky flycatcher, dusky-brown flycatcher or dusky alseonax (Muscicapa adusta by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49641211567_398e1f4204_b.jpgP2111689 Ashy Flycatcher (Fraseria caerulescens) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49641211472_a1f12121f9_b.jpgP2111726 African Blue-flycatcher (Elminia longicauda) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49640413523_bf02a5bab1_b.jpgP2111742 Blue-headed Sunbird (Cyanomitra alinae) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49641210437_38b00460fa_b.jpgP2111751 Speckled Mousebird (Colius striatus) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

@xelas did you amalgamate the following afternoon's roadside birding in with your last post? I have crowned eagle but dated the 12th? 

Edited by kittykat23uk
Link to post
Share on other sites
Galana

Nice Flufftail. I take it this was when Emmy led the two ladies down into the forest? Nice Wattle-eye too. Hmmm!

Link to post
Share on other sites
xelas
2 hours ago, kittykat23uk said:

@xelas did you amalgamate the following afternoon's roadside birding in with your last post?

 

Yes I did. Not very chronologically, I know. But it was in the afternoon, after all :D.

 

Thank you also for making me double-check the mangabey. I have corrected the ID accordingly.

 

Your White-spotted Flufftail is another Special bird from our trip! Well done, Jo! Zvezda has missed it. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
Galana
1 hour ago, xelas said:

Zvezda has missed it. 

I was stood with Zvezda earlier and thought she had got it then.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Galana

And just in case anyone should think I don't like all Primates here are some from the trip so far that I cannot include in my BY.

1-DSCN5503.JPG.01a0ef0e313db12d4a2d421d5d20d2bd.JPG

1-DSCN5555.JPG.6f702b563e245bab682c0b8a9bf22038.JPG

1-DSCN6837.JPG.3630ed17ffa9ac0ca46c400858625532.JPG

1-DSCN6407.JPG.922bed43a34f553e6d2e7adaf9f8aa92.JPG

and...1-DSCN6404.JPG.3e57b98ce2e936edb29bbefdc88914a1.JPG

Look out Jo. He's behind you.

 

Might as well do an Ellie while I am at it.

1-DSCN5909.JPG.d700bc8981ffe223d3c9e7872b61eff0.JPG

1-DSCN5969.JPG.1a05c3797e69acd703eb430c585a2aea.JPG

 

 

 

Edited by Galana
Additional photo.
Link to post
Share on other sites
janzin

Just to clarify... ;) there are a few primates I like...certainly lemurs are primates...but they are not monkeys! Also, there are even a few monkeys I don't mind...like the tamarins of South America. They are cute. :D I think the more human-like they are, the less I like them.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Soukous

A Black Bee-eater, lovely. Another one for the list.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Galana
51 minutes ago, Soukous said:

Another one for the list.

I hope that you are writing them all down. You will need a notebook!:lol:

Link to post
Share on other sites
Soukous
19 minutes ago, Galana said:

I hope that you are writing them all down. You will need a notebook!

 

No need, I can just check @xelas Big Year when the time is right.

Link to post
Share on other sites
xelas

Ugh, I am afraid we have missed quite some species. Latest count of ticks was above 400, and my present count of clicks (until Buhoma) is 225.

Above number will increase with every BY post by @Galana, who can send you his Birds list, so you can prepare yourself.

Edited by xelas
Link to post
Share on other sites
Galana
19 minutes ago, xelas said:

Latest count of ticks was above 400, and my present count of clicks (until Buhoma) is 225.

Obviously not counting your 3257 Yellow-vented Bulbuls.:P My good friend Fraulein Klickunttick says you should aim for 75%.

Link to post
Share on other sites
kittykat23uk
On 3/15/2020 at 9:59 AM, Soukous said:

I should also say that I am happy @kittykat23uk is not participating in BY as it would mean yet another person is way ahead of me. 

 

I doubt that @Soukous, in any case I think @Galana and the Alex/Zvezda team took way more different birds than I did, since I have not needed to capture EBCs.. and I have to take time out to look for primates too. So not much point doing a big year for me.  

Link to post
Share on other sites
xelas
17 minutes ago, kittykat23uk said:

I have not needed to capture EBCs.

Neither do we ... they just happens :ph34r:.

Link to post
Share on other sites
janzin

What's an EBC? (I think i've asked this before but I don't remember. And folks here not on BY threads might want some clarification :lol:

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
Galana
11 minutes ago, janzin said:

What's an EBC?

Every Bird Counts! Started to creep into BY posts a few years back and now even has a special award.

Link to post
Share on other sites
kittykat23uk

@janzin You only have to look at @Galana's "Caspian Plovers" in his BY2020 thread to understand what I mean :lol: 

Link to post
Share on other sites
Galana
2 hours ago, kittykat23uk said:

@janzin You only have to look at @Galana's "Caspian Plovers" in his BY2020 thread to understand what I mean :lol: 

Yeah! Learn from the Master!:P

Edited by Galana
Link to post
Share on other sites
kittykat23uk

12 Feb 2020

 

I was up with the birds, so shot the purple dawn from my room at 0649, before heading out for some pre-breakfast birding. 

 

49600169296_83bd7273d1_b.jpgIMG_20200212_064947 by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

I got better views of the iconic African Grey Parrot on the way to breakfast. The light was bad, this shot is enhanced. 

 

49654523278_827ce4964d_b.jpgP2120059 copy African grey parrot (Psittacus erithacus) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

The "Golden Hour" doesn't last long, but I made good use of it with a bird I have wanted to see for a long time- the Palm-nut Vulture. This shot is taken at 0735

 

49654523033_9e862f5884_b.jpgP2120290 Palm-nut Vulture Gypohierax angolensis by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

Birding continued over the breakfast table:

 

49655061141_3ae0a07511_b.jpgP2120310 Vieillot's black weaver (Ploceus nigerrimus) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

The light was probably best close to 0800, the parrots and vultures posing in the palms:

 

49655060911_5dde827aca_b.jpgP2120351 grey parrot (Psittacus erithacus) by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

49655060781_a20842dc35_b.jpgP2120374 Palm-nut Vulture Gypohierax angolensis by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

At 0830 we assembled for our day trip to Bigodi Swamp

 

49654512978_0da982c34b_c.jpg

P2120408 Blue-headed agama by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by kittykat23uk
Link to post
Share on other sites
BRACQUENE

That Palm-Nut Vulture is really fantastic but @kittykat23uk if you hadn’t mentioned it I never would have thought it was a vulture in the first place!

Link to post
Share on other sites
xelas

BIGODI SWAMP

 

 

There must be a special thing between Fred and swamp. We have been taken to many swamps on our trip, some bigger some smaller. It looked like Fred really likes them, browsing through the reed and trying to spot a hidden gem there. 

 

Bigodi swamp, or more properly, Bigodi Wetland Sanctuary located in Bigodi swamp, is one of the long time prime birding locations. That this sanctuary is operated by the local community for many years was quickly understood, by the lack of the maintenance of the wooden boardwalks. It may be a birdwatcher’s paradise, but birders must better watch where they step. Also important to notice is that there is no “pit stops” available on this round trek. So use the toilets before starting the walk. 

 

After paying the entry fee (50.000 UGX pp), a guide was allocated to our group, and we have started a 3 ½ hours journey through the wetlands. 

 

1006966567_UGN134.JPG.c995da9143161d1c5180ceab19ff0692.JPG

 

78868458_UGN135.JPG.c440d4dbe39320d6d4a2987aba82f522.JPG

 

1839929918_UGN136.JPG.2594f886e190383351b2665b07f3010e.JPG

 

1795317749_UGN137.JPG.3b8a038b2197cd901a8003ea4c8abdab.JPG

 

527551958_UGN138.JPG.831b0465dcda8a7c51aebde3daaa3a05.JPG

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
xelas

Frankly speaking, the birding was not as good as I have expected to be. Vegetation was dense, light was scarce or too bright, and we might also been there too late, starting our hike at around 9:00. Part of the track is within dense vegetation, and part of the track is bordering with cultivated land.  Also the walk is quite long, and can be a bit boring on the last 1/3, walking on the local road. It was hot and humid, a small bottle of water was not enough liquid for one person.

 

Nevertheless we have had some nice encounters, with butterflies, birds and monkeys.

 

354663092_UGN139.JPG.30b5a9ac905a4773ea007f57477620cf.JPG

 

1773933817_UGN140.JPG.a6970db9883d53399b58f1f56d3afeab.JPG

 

1518468001_UGN141.JPG.d8ec84251da484131ff91fa776cd6e53.JPG

 

 

Edited by xelas
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Safaritalk uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. By using Safaritalk you agree to our use of cookies. If you wish to refuse the setting of cookies you can change settings on your browser to clear and block cookies. However, by doing so, Safaritalk may not work properly and you may not be able to access all areas. If you are happy to accept cookies and haven't adjusted browser settings to refuse cookies, Safaritalk will issue cookies when you log on to our site. Please also take a moment to read the Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy: Terms of Use l Privacy Policy