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Wild Dogger

Desert-adapted Elephant feeding on a tree in the dry Huab river in sandstorm

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Merry Christmas everybody!

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2013 Mana ele's   2R4C3380 by Whyone, on Flickr 2R4C3386 by Whyone, on Flickr 2R4C3068 by Whyone, on Flickr 2R4C3664 by Whyone, on Flickr 2R4C3208 by Whyone, on Flickr 2R4C

Desert-adapted Elephant feeding on a tree in the dry Huab river in sandstorm Merry Christmas everybody!

Here's an image from the South Luangwa, taken from a microlight out from Tafika camp back in late June. Many thanks to my pilot John Coppinger for some skillful flying in banking the microlight at ju

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Wonderful light and atmosphere in that one @@Wild Dogger

 

Bedroom visitor.

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Tom Kellie

~ @@Wild Dogger and @@Big Andy

 

Like both of your images with elephants raising trunks heavenward.

They're a well-matched pair.

Taking a photo in a sandstorm sounds like a technical challenge far beyond my current abilities.

I'd never heard of the Huab River before...thanks for mentioning it.

Photographing an elephant that close to a tent must have been a dicey situation. Glad you shared the result with us.

Tom K.

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@@Tom Kellie Surprisingly there appeared to be nothing dicey about it at all, old Vic was the perfect gent and so long as you didn't encroach on his space and let him come to you it appeared to be a comfortable situation for him. This was with two Zim guides there to advise us I might add but either way a wonderful experience and a memory to treasure.

 

And he was this close.

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Tom Kellie

~ @@Big Andy

 

I stand corrected...and AMAZED!

What a TERRIFIC image!

I never realized that such encounters occured.

Thank you for posting it with the followup information.

Tom K.

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pomkiwi

Close up in Sabi Sands March 2015

 

 

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  • 3 weeks later...
Tom Kellie

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Mother Feeding with Baby Beneath



Photographed at 9:08 am on 3 May, 2015 in Masai Mara National Reserve, Kenya, using an EOS 1D X camera and an EF 400mm f/2.8L IS II super-telephoto lens.


ISO 6400, 1/8000 sec., f/10, 400mm focal length, handheld Manual exposure.


*****************************************************************************************************


A small elephant family group was feeding in bushes near the track. Anthony and I stop for elephants. At first there seemed to be adults and older juveniles, as no babies were visible.


However, after Anthony slightly repositioned the safari van, we saw a baby in the shadow of its mother, seemingly attempting to nurse. The mother's placid feeding contrasted with her baby's frantic attempts to obtain milk.

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  • 3 weeks later...
Morkel Erasmus

~ @@Big Andy

 

I stand corrected...and AMAZED!

What a TERRIFIC image!

I never realized that such encounters occured.

Thank you for posting it with the followup information.

Tom K.

 

@@Tom Kellie you need to go to Mana, my friend!!!

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Morkel Erasmus

Another magical afternoon as the sun sets on the Zambezi river (Mana Pools).

 

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Towlersonsafari

@@Morkel Erasmus congrats on you wildlife photographer of the year finalist picture I got very excited when I saw it at the Natural History museum!

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  • 2 weeks later...
Tom Kellie

~ @@Towlersonsafari

 

May I please ask which Natural History museum is displaying an image by @@Morkel Erasmus?

Judging by the superlative images he posts on Safaritalk, it's easy to understand how he would be eligible for a wildlife photographer of the year award.

Tom K.

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Towlersonsafari

Well @@Tom Kellie it was the BBC Wildlife Photographer competition at the Natural History Museum in London

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  • 1 month later...
rajivwelikala

Hi Friends,

 

I have been reading through the discussions and there have been quite some interesting posts about big tuskers.

 

Even though I am from Sri Lanka , I have been studying about big tuskers since I was a little boy.

 

One of the best books on the subject is by Dr Johan Marais. Which covers most of the big tuskers in South Africa.

 

Regards to weight of east african elephants tusks being less which was posted by a friend in the forum, I have to disagree because the heaviest tusks of a known elephant in recent years was Ahmed. The weights of the magnificent 7 and Ahmed are all there in Johann Marais book, and its clear that Ahmed is way heavier. Also the heaviest pair of tusks are from a tusker killed in the foothills of Mount Killimanjaro.

 

Due to my lifelong interest I made a trip in search of these last giants of Africa.

 

This brought me to Amboseli, which is home to a giant tusker named Tim. He is the biggest bull in the park and has some magnificent pair of Ivory.

 

My search took several days, during which I did see him, but mainly too far away to photograph.

 

I was extremely lucky on my last game drive, when I saw him with a herd in a distance, and decided to park the van and wait patiently. My patience paid off, when the big guy crossed the road in front of me. This is one of the highlights of my life and will treasure this moment for all time.

 

Also in addition to Tim I saw another big tusker, whose name I beleive is Tolstoy.

 

Hope you enjoy the pics.

 

 

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Tom Kellie

~ @@rajivwelikala

 

I was unfamiliar with the background of Tim.

It's very nice of you to explain that and to mention the book by Dr. Johan Marais.

Your strategy of patience in Amboseli, waiting for Tim to pass by was both respectful and ultimately successful.

The photos are GORGEOUS! During three safari visits in three different years to Amboseli, I never attained your level of superb elephant photography.

Thank you so much — seeing your images here made my day!

Tom K.

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Game Warden

@@rajivwelikala Fantastic stuff - thanks for posting these images. Very interested to read your observations about the Sri Lankan elephant population and threats it faces, would you be willing to start a new topic in the World Wildlife subforum, perhaps with photos if you have any?

 

Thanks, Matt.

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Kitsafari

@@rajivwelikala beautiful pictures of an incredible bull, especially with the younger urns by his side. in the last pic, the bull doesn't look like tim and am i wrong but is he appearing a tad agitated? or he may be shaking the dust out of his ears!

 

may tim and tolstoy stay safe always.

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PHALANX

Galdessa camp on the Galana river in Tsavo east Kenya is one of the most amazing places to see some big tuskers at close range.

You are not allowed to walk freely around the grounds because of these regular visitors who can appear in camp at any time, though at certain times of the year they do go walk about, i.e. in the rainy season. You are escorted to and from your tent for meals, drives etc at an arranged time, and providing you stay on your verandah or within the lounge area, these big boys come pretty close enabling great photo opportunities. Through out the day you can watch many family groups crossing to & throw the Galana river, Heaven.

 

post-50530-0-51153100-1459161143_thumb.jpg

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rajivwelikala

@@rajivwelikala Fantastic stuff - thanks for posting these images. Very interested to read your observations about the Sri Lankan elephant population and threats it faces, would you be willing to start a new topic in the World Wildlife subforum, perhaps with photos if you have any?

 

Thanks, Matt.

Dear matt. Thanks for the kind words. Of course would love to contribute to a worthy discussion. Send me the link of the discussion.

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PHALANX

Hi Friends,

 

I have been reading through the discussions and there have been quite some interesting posts about big tuskers.

 

Even though I am from Sri Lanka , I have been studying about big tuskers since I was a little boy.

 

One of the best books on the subject is by Dr Johan Marais. Which covers most of the big tuskers in South Africa.

 

Regards to weight of east african elephants tusks being less which was posted by a friend in the forum, I have to disagree because the heaviest tusks of a known elephant in recent years was Ahmed. The weights of the magnificent 7 and Ahmed are all there in Johann Marais book, and its clear that Ahmed is way heavier. Also the heaviest pair of tusks are from a tusker killed in the foothills of Mount Killimanjaro.

 

Due to my lifelong interest I made a trip in search of these last giants of Africa.

 

This brought me to Amboseli, which is home to a giant tusker named Tim. He is the biggest bull in the park and has some magnificent pair of Ivory.

 

My search took several days, during which I did see him, but mainly too far away to photograph.

 

I was extremely lucky on my last game drive, when I saw him with a herd in a distance, and decided to park the van and wait patiently. My patience paid off, when the big guy crossed the road in front of me. This is one of the highlights of my life and will treasure this moment for all time.

 

Also in addition to Tim I saw another big tusker, whose name I beleive is Tolstoy.

 

Hope you enjoy the pics.

 

 

Magnificent photo's Rajiv. In Amboseli I saw Dionysus way back in 1998, do you know if he is still alive? he would be extremely old now.

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rajivwelikala

~ @@rajivwelikala

 

 

I was unfamiliar with the background of Tim.

It's very nice of you to explain that and to mention the book by Dr. Johan Marais.

Your strategy of patience in Amboseli, waiting for Tim to pass by was both respectful and ultimately successful.

The photos are GORGEOUS! During three safari visits in three different years to Amboseli, I never attained your level of superb elephant photography.

Thank you so much seeing your images here made my day!

Tom K.

Hi Tom.

Thanks.

Tuskers are of special interest to me since i was little and hence seeing Tim was a childhood dream come true. Not only does he have magnifficent ivory but also hes quite tall. Maybe around 12 feet.

The other bull I think is Tolstoy. He was abit irritated and shook his head. We backed off.

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PHALANX

Natures crowning glory.

Not up to Rajiv' standards but I hope you enjoy them.

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Game Warden

@@rajivwelikala Please feel free to start a new topic of your own in this Subforum. It will be great to have a Sri Lanka wildlife expert keeping us abreast of conservation and wildlife issues there.

 

Many thanks again, Matt

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rajivwelikala

 

Hi Friends,

 

I have been reading through the discussions and there have been quite some interesting posts about big tuskers.

 

Even though I am from Sri Lanka , I have been studying about big tuskers since I was a little boy.

 

One of the best books on the subject is by Dr Johan Marais. Which covers most of the big tuskers in South Africa.

 

Regards to weight of east african elephants tusks being less which was posted by a friend in the forum, I have to disagree because the heaviest tusks of a known elephant in recent years was Ahmed. The weights of the magnificent 7 and Ahmed are all there in Johann Marais book, and its clear that Ahmed is way heavier. Also the heaviest pair of tusks are from a tusker killed in the foothills of Mount Killimanjaro.

 

Due to my lifelong interest I made a trip in search of these last giants of Africa.

 

This brought me to Amboseli, which is home to a giant tusker named Tim. He is the biggest bull in the park and has some magnificent pair of Ivory.

 

My search took several days, during which I did see him, but mainly too far away to photograph.

 

I was extremely lucky on my last game drive, when I saw him with a herd in a distance, and decided to park the van and wait patiently. My patience paid off, when the big guy crossed the road in front of me. This is one of the highlights of my life and will treasure this moment for all time.

 

Also in addition to Tim I saw another big tusker, whose name I beleive is Tolstoy.

 

Hope you enjoy the pics.

 

 

Magnificent photo's Rajiv. In Amboseli I saw Dionysus way back in 1998, do you know if he is still alive? he would be extremely old now.

 

Hi

Thanks for the kind words. It was quite an ordeal searching for him. and Really rewarding when I finally got a good encounter. Tim is the biggest bull now. Dionysus died some time back I beleive.

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PHALANX

Snapshot from Kwara:

 

gallery_5715_361_219691.jpg

 

 

sunset @ Nxai Pan with Elephant:

 

gallery_5715_317_44152.jpg

 

Trunkless @ Lebala:

 

gallery_5715_317_369080.jpg

 

Lagoon:

 

gallery_5715_317_305711.jpg

RE: your trunkless Elephant. I saw one in Murchison falls Nat' pk in 2002, A young bull.He was in a family group & good health feeding along the rivers edge. I was told it was a snare? In Tanzania/Kenya there was a period where Elephants were being seen with the lower part of their trunks half severed.

Edited by PHALANX
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