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Game Warden

Who will start the ball rolling with an African image - the subject of which begins with Y?

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  • 4 weeks later...

Yellow-winged Bats

 

Masai Mara September 2009

 

YellowWingBat5.jpg

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Game Warden

Wow, I think that's a first. Tell us a bit about them Paul T. Thanks, Matt.

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Wow, I think that's a first. Tell us a bit about them Paul T. Thanks, Matt.

 

The yellow-winged bats were found at Keekorok Lodge.

 

There are a number of chalets located on the southeast corner of the lodge which overlook the Keekorok grounds. I was staying in one of the standard rooms (cabin) at the rear of the lodge so I had no idea that these bats were present. We arrived back after an afternoon game drive and got talking to some of the other guests on our tour and one of them mentioned that they had seen bats outside their chalet. Now me having an interest in bats quizzed them further and asked to see where they were. Off we went to the chalets where I got told "They're in those trees". The trees line the path outside the chalets and there are quite a number of them. So I walked up to a couple trees to have a closer look thinking I'd see black bats. I couldn't see the bats until one of them flew out of the tree. I stood still, kept quiet, looked closer and saw them. The bats were very aware of my presence and with them being positioned inside the tree the branches would obscure them so it took time to find a clear view to get the picture.

 

The following info about the bats is courtesy of Wikipedia:

The yellow-winged bat is a behaviorally monogamous species. Pairs of males and females are formed and maintained during the breeding season and each pair maintains exclusive foraging territories. The male and female of a pair roost less than 1 m apart. One member is vigilant during the day and will turn its head 225° and pin its ears to the back to check for disturbances. Between the foraging periods in the morning and evening, the male visits the peripheral roost and defends it from conspecifics. In the morning, one member of the pair will swoop up to its partner and hover, with or without hovering. The pair then separates for the day. The male and female meet again at the primary roost tree before the evening foraging and will groom and stretching and perform other social interaction. The maximum amount of male-female social interaction occurs between May and early June. This is when the rains are abundant, insects are plentiful and the young learn how to forage. Male and females will interact at midday, dusk and dawn.

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  • 1 year later...
Game Warden

Last post here over a year ago. Time for an update. Who has a Y themed Africa photo to upload?

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  • 1 month later...

yellow-billed hornbills

post-17651-0-25321900-1357080453.jpg

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  • 3 years later...
IamFisheye

Yellow-Throated Longclaw

 

26026725005_e0ac520667_z.jpg

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