Jump to content

A picture a day.


Recommended Posts

Wild Dogger

Stalking lion, Lion Camp, SLNP. Zambia

 

gallery_5715_1316_433658.jpg

Edited by Wild Dogger
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 1.6k
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • Game Warden

    147

  • africapurohit

    145

  • Rainbirder

    97

  • Wild Dogger

    83

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Romance in the Lamai Wedge - Northern Serengeti, Tanzania, August 2013  

Dare to be different! As the wildebeest migration proceeds through the Mara the herds graze on the move creating a low envelope of dust that seems to settle around head-height. One beastie dared to

Posted Images

Peter Connan

It would be difficult to capture more intent and concentration than that @@Wild Dogger

Link to post
Share on other sites
KaingU Lodge

Goliath heron on the river a couple of days ago.

 

 

11846630_931890116868329_664910549119665

Link to post
Share on other sites
Earthian

something different: sunset in one of the atolls of Maldives

 

gallery_45142_1328_247264.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
Tom Kellie

~ @@Earthian

 

What a lovely image!

Both the scene itself and the colors of the image are beguiling.

The red-orange of the solar disk and the sunrays up through the clouds are as fine as the brushstrokes of Impressionist masters.

Love the composition, with fine balance, the Sun in the center.

Man thanks for sharing this on Safaritalk!

Tom K.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Tom Kellie

post-49296-0-69024300-1440023087_thumb.jpg



Beijing Sunrise — 5:54 am



Photographed on 20 August, 2015 at 05:54 am from my 8th floor, north-facing kitchen window in Beijing, with an EOS 1D X camera and an EF 400mm f/2.8L IS II super-telephoto lens.



ISO 200, 1/2500 sec., f/2.8, handheld Manual exposure, leaning out the window-frame, looking eastward.



****************************************************************************************************************************************



There are photographs which circumstances compose, rather than the photographer. Once or twice a year the Sun rises passing directly through the spire of Beijing TV Tower, as viewed from my 8th floor kitchen window. When it occurs, it's a bit before 6 am, lasting only a minute or two.



Today happens to be 七夕节, the Qixi Festival, commemorating long-ago lovers. On this smoggy morning, the blazing solar furnace glowed against the dark background as it ‘threaded the needle’ of Beijing TV Tower, in celebration of 七夕节.


Link to post
Share on other sites
Earthian

Here is one from Yellowstone National Park:

 

gallery_45142_1328_447657.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
KaingU Lodge

JohnD is one of only two guides in the whole Kafue to have fully qualified as a Grade 1 canoe guide. My friend's son is as happy as he was when the results came out!

 

This-river-is-wild-1024x681.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
KaingU Lodge

Following Tom's lead....

 

11891976_935823546474986_525487937054951

Link to post
Share on other sites
Earthian

Here is another one from YNP. There is something sinister looking about this pool and it looks bottomless.

gallery_45142_1328_35398.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

So much nice pictures in here!

 

Let see if I can find some species that have not been posted here yet...
First out, the Cat-like Fossa.

From Kirindy Forest, Madagascar

post-49909-0-88707600-1440531836_thumb.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
Tom Kellie

So much nice pictures in here!

 

Let see if I can find some species that have not been posted here yet...

First out, the Cat-like Fossa.

From Kirindy Forest, Madagascar

 

~ @@Antee

 

Welcome to Safaritalk!

You've given us quite a treat with the Fossa image.

Many, many THANKS for that!

If ever you feel that it's comfortable and convenient, it would be most welcome to read a self-introduction in the Introductions section. But only if you feel like doing so.

Your photo is unique. That's such a pleasure to see.

Tom K.

Link to post
Share on other sites
TonyQ

@@Antee

Great to see a fossa - and welcome to Safaritalk

Link to post
Share on other sites
elefromoz

Lord Howe Island 2014. This small island lies 600KM east of Australia, it is a World Heritage site of "natural significance", namely forests, southernmost coral reef and its Seabirds. This mother White Tern sat waiting patiently for her chick to return, it had gone off for a fly around, lunch was ready.

gallery_49445_1311_159031.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
Wild Dogger

Puku in the South Luangwa NP, close to Lion Camp

gallery_5715_1316_165035.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
Big Andy

Mount Blanc at sunset in the French Alps.

 

734FFD52C3E9497DBE7F6AE7595388CF-0000339

Link to post
Share on other sites
kittykat23uk

@@Big Andy that is a beautiful image lovely light!

Link to post
Share on other sites
elefromoz

Some more non-African wildlife, Bison "fence jumping", Grand Teton National Park Wyoming

gallery_49445_1340_922155.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
KaingU Lodge

New 'parrot hide' in action. Every morning a couple of hundred Meyer's parrots gather and eat mud before dispersing for the day's feeding. Sometimes a couple of grey headed join them. Quite a spectacular sight.

 

 

10984986_940741209316553_875091896437265

Link to post
Share on other sites
Tom Kellie

New 'parrot hide' in action. Every morning a couple of hundred Meyer's parrots gather and eat mud before dispersing for the day's feeding. Sometimes a couple of grey headed join them. Quite a spectacular sight.

 

~ @@KaingU Lodge

 

Why do the parrots eat mud?

Tom K.

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

New 'parrot hide' in action. Every morning a couple of hundred Meyer's parrots gather and eat mud before dispersing for the day's feeding. Sometimes a couple of grey headed join them. Quite a spectacular sight.

 

~ @@KaingU Lodge

 

Why do the parrots eat mud?

Tom K.

 

@@Tom Kellie

 

To obtain minerals and also for medicinal purposes. Parrots are seed eaters and seeds contain alkaloids that can be poisonous. In the parrots stomach particles from the clay bind with the alkaloids rendering them harmless.

 

As an aside I think there is a type of clay that is used in pet foods and human supplements.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Tom Kellie

@@Tom Kellie

 

To obtain minerals and also for medicinal purposes. Parrots are seed eaters and seeds contain alkaloids that can be poisonous. In the parrots stomach particles from the clay bind with the alkaloids rendering them harmless.

 

As an aside I think there is a type of clay that is used in pet foods and human supplements.

 

~ @@Geoff

 

Thank you so much for explaining the motivation for mud-eating.

I'd heard of calcium montmorillonite clay being used as a pet food additive, but was unaware of birds eating any sort of clay.

Yours truly may have nibbled a bit of soil when a wee tot, as the faintest of memories remains.

Who knows? Doing so may have done its part in toughening up the immune system — I've enjoyed fairly good health throughout my life.

As other families of birds are also seed eaters, do they likewise do anything akin to the mud-eating of parrots?

In other words, to bind the alkaloids in their digestive systems, is their a comparable dietary mechanism?

During safaris, I'd never knowingly observed anything like @@KaingU Lodge's fine image, although goodness knows I'm hardly privy to the secret lives of birds!

Tom K.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Safaritalk uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. By using Safaritalk you agree to our use of cookies. If you wish to refuse the setting of cookies you can change settings on your browser to clear and block cookies. However, by doing so, Safaritalk may not work properly and you may not be able to access all areas. If you are happy to accept cookies and haven't adjusted browser settings to refuse cookies, Safaritalk will issue cookies when you log on to our site. Please also take a moment to read the Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy: Terms of Use l Privacy Policy