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As other families of birds are also seed eaters, do they likewise do anything akin to the mud-eating of parrots?

In other words, to bind the alkaloids in their digestive systems, is their a comparable dietary mechanism?

 

@@Tom Kellie

 

I'm pretty sure other species of birds would eat clay or dirt. I've watched sparrows and finches peck at mortar between brick work. Also some birds need grit to aid in digestion.

 

Reptiles eat stones to aid in digestion too and you may have seen elephants at salt licks. Lots of creatures eat dirt, and as you pointed out before, even some humans eat dirt.

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Romance in the Lamai Wedge - Northern Serengeti, Tanzania, August 2013  

Dare to be different! As the wildebeest migration proceeds through the Mara the herds graze on the move creating a low envelope of dust that seems to settle around head-height. One beastie dared to

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KaingU Lodge

 

 

As other families of birds are also seed eaters, do they likewise do anything akin to the mud-eating of parrots?

In other words, to bind the alkaloids in their digestive systems, is their a comparable dietary mechanism?

 

@@Tom Kellie

 

I'm pretty sure other species of birds would eat clay or dirt. I've watched sparrows and finches peck at mortar between brick work. Also some birds need grit to aid in digestion.

 

Reptiles eat stones to aid in digestion too and you may have seen elephants at salt licks. Lots of creatures eat dirt, and as you pointed out before, even some humans eat dirt.

 

 

Various pigeon and doves also join in the morning mud frenzy. We often visited this pond before, but never early morning and so once we realised what was going on we have subsequently built a hide there. It is quite a sight, several hundred parrots gather from 06:30 through to about 07:30 before dispersing off for their days feeding. We were lucky enough to catch two Grey headed parrots in among the Meyer's

 

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Peter Connan

There is even a word for it: Geophagy (not sure of the spelling).

 

Ostriches swallow quite a lot of rocks, and there are many stories in the arid south-west of people finding large diamonds in ostrich scat...

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Tom Kellie

~ @@Peter Connan

 

You've given me quite a laugh!

The thought of ‘diamond miners’ diligently breaking apart ostrich ‘byproducts’ is comical on a heavily overcast Tuesday afternoon.

As @@Geoff noted, there are those, like young Tom, who were geophagous. No diamonds, I'm afraid, although no one ever checked.

Kudos again to @@KaingU Lodge for raising the issue with his morning parrot photos.

Tom K.

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@@KaingU Lodge

 

Very interesting behavioural shots.

 

If I was using that hide I'd be tempted to place a perch in a suitable location in the hope that the parrots use it as a staging post before foraging in the mud.

 

Some nice portraits might be in the offing. You never know your luck.

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KaingU Lodge

@@KaingU Lodge

 

Very interesting behavioural shots.

 

If I was using that hide I'd be tempted to place a perch in a suitable location in the hope that the parrots use it as a staging post before foraging in the mud.

 

Some nice portraits might be in the offing. You never know your luck.

 

Good idea. Maybe later today if things go to plan. I did the same at the bee-eater hide (just a pole in the ground) and it worked well. Very short video of them below.

 

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@@Tom Kellie

Parrots in South America are well known for eating clay. Here are a couple of shots from Peru - Amazon region (in 2007!). The sites they visit are called "clay licks" and I think the birds are responsible for the strangely shaped erosion on the bank.

 

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And slightly less spectacular birds, but in very large numbers


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Edited by TonyQ
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Tom Kellie

@@Tom Kellie

Parrots in South America are well known for eating clay. Here are a couple of shots from Peru - Amazon region (in 2007!). The sites they visit are called "clay licks" and I think the birds are responsible for the strangely shaped erosion on the bank.

And slightly less spectacular birds, but in very large numbers.

 

~ @@TonyQ

 

Thanks to you, @@KaingU Lodge and @@Geoff, Safaritalk is strongly fulfilling the educational facet of its overall mission.

I'm grateful to all of you for the explanations and instructive photographs. This is fresh territory for me, hence highly interesting.

Your “parrots at clay licks” images are fascinating. I've never seen anything like that.

The intensely vibrant parrots on the neutral earth tones results in compelling images, from both the educational and the decorative perspective.

Number Tom as one of those who didn't realize that birds — in this case, parrots — were agents of erosion.

This ‘A picture a day’ thread is a mini-course in animal behavior, if only to redress the ignorance of yours truly.

Great photos, great cooperation and explanations from all three of you, and great education about this subject!

With Gratitude,

Tom K.

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Now that we´re on the birds, let´s continue on that path...

Let me introduce the first King Penguin in this thread!
He was totally lost from far away when he entered the beach of Martillo Island outside Ushuaia, Patagonia, Argentina with all of the Magellan Penguins.

 

Let´s hope he found his way home!

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Tom Kellie

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Repartee at the Emakoko



~ Photographed on 28 July, 2015 at 2:03 pm at the Emakoko, Nairobi, Kenya, with a Sony RX1 R camera.



ISO 400, f/5.6, 1/80 sec., 35mm focal length, handheld Automatic exposure.



*******************************************************************************************************



While game drives are understandably the primary focus of most safaris, there's also much pleasure in conversations with friends old and new at lodge or camp dining tables.



In this case my safari traveling partner, ZHU Jinjie of Peking University Health Science Center in Beijing is talking with Kenya guide @@Zarek Cockar about future career options.



The open-air dining room of the Emakoko is a relaxed setting for such genial repartee as they, and I, enjoyed one very pleasant Tuesday afternoon.


Edited by Tom Kellie
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Earthian

Turtle bay in Oahu, Hawai'i.

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Tom Kellie

Turtle bay in Oahu, Hawai'i.

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~ @@Earthian

 

WOW !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Love it !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Hawaii's home for me, thus seeing it in such a vibrant image makes my morning!

The blues...the greens...the clouds...the waves...the coconut palms...all tug at my heart.

Yet the pièce de résistance is the resting sea turtle. TERRIFIC!

Thank you for lighting up Safaritalk with this special image of Turtle Bay!

Tom K.

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Earthian

@@Tom Kellie

you do know how to light up one's day!

here is another one for you from Hawai'i:

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Tom Kellie

@@Tom Kellie

you do know how to light up one's day!

here is another one for you from Hawai'i:

 

~ @@Earthian

 

Hanauma Bay!

GORGEOUS!

I'm so glad that you went there.

The colors, coral, and atmosphere — Happiness!

Very family friendly — ideal for teaching children to observe and respect tidal and reef life.

Thank you!

Tom K.

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Earthian

@@Tom Kellie

 

yes, Hanauma bay. you still remember your Hawai'i.

 

Though in all fairness, i must confess that it was very crowded and quite choppy. We reached there a few minutes after 9 am and yet we didnt get parking and hence no entry. We came back around noon and we got parking.

 

Lets see if you recognise this one.

 

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Not often you get a bum and a face as the same subject! (Oops...meant to put th is with the Bum thread! I will repost...)
Taken in the OMC last November, we watched this mom struggle for 30-40 minutes before she was able to give birth. It seemed that something was a little "stuck." We stayed well back so as not to righten her, so this was taken at 560mm I think, and cropped down. But it was an extraoprdinary moment to catch!

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Edited by NJW
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KaingU Lodge

Lesser bushbaby on a evening drive two nights ago.

 

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kittykat23uk

So cute! :)

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Earthian

we came upon this isolated beach in Oahu near the US defence radar station The road suddenly ended.

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Black Faced Impala from Etosha, Namibia

 

Of course they have a place in here :)

 

Less then 1000 individuals existing but the numbers are rising.

 

Much more funnier than the quite boring common Impala :)

Anyhow, slightly beautiful and bigger than their cousins.

post-49909-0-33340500-1441643242_thumb.jpg

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This is Chip!
We met this summer in Yellowstone NP.

Become best friends, sharing peanuts and talk about everything.

 

Hope you have a great winter Chip!

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Wild Dogger

The tuskless Tuskers

We found many of the elephants in the South Luangwa NP without tusks.

gallery_5715_1316_417741.jpg

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@@Wild Dogger There's an interloper with tusks in that herd.

 

Nice shot, I like the comp.

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Earthian

Here is another from Hawai'i:

 

gallery_45142_1346_2126420.jpg

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