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The_Norwegian

The dreaded black mamba with the smile of death ;-) 

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Taken by Kathy Duplessis on our recent trip to Katavi NP in western Tanzania. This giant crocodile was trying to devour a large crocodile, shaking it like a wet rag. Nikon D300 with a 70-200 f2.8 VR

In July 2016 I captured the attached images of an African Puff Adder in Ruaha N.P. Over the years I have seen several specimens but never one with this striking ( no pun intended ) colouration. Usuall

Bush Snake   Walter Sisulu Botanical Gardens, Roodepoort.       Nikon D750 + 500mm f4 f4, 1/2500 ISO 900

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michael-ibk

Wow fantastic, where did you take these? 

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  • 2 weeks later...
The_Norwegian
On 9/30/2020 at 9:24 PM, michael-ibk said:

Wow fantastic, where did you take these? 

 

 

Sabi sands :-) Thank you :-) 

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Petter Sverke

Here's a few crocodilians from different trips.

 

Saltwater crocodile, Kinabatangan, Borneo 2015

Black caiman, Yasuni National Park, Ecuador 2016

Nile crocodile, Kazinga Channel, Uganda 2017

Mugger crocodile, Dudhwa National Park, India 2019

Indian gharials, Jim Corbett National Park, India 2019

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Edited by Petter Sverke
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Petter Sverke
19 minutes ago, Petter Sverke said:

Here's a few crocodilians from different trips.

 

Saltwater crocodile, Kinabatangan, Borneo 2015

Black caiman, Yasuni National Park, Ecuador 2016

Nile crocodile, Kazinga Channel, Uganda 2017

Mugger crocodile, Dudhwa National Park, India 2019

Indian gharials, Jim Corbett National Park, India 2019

 

Quote

Saltwater crocodile, Kinabatangan, Borneo 2015

Black caiman, Yasuni National Park, Ecuador 2016
 

Nile crocodile, Kazinga Channel, Uganda 2017
 

Mugger crocodile, Dudhwa National Park, India 2019
 

Indian gharials, Jim Corbett National Park, India 2019
 

Saltwater crocodile, Kinabatangan, Borneo 2015

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Black caiman, Yasuni National Park, Ecuador 2016
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Nile crocodile, Kazinga Channel, Uganda 2017

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Mugger crocodile, Dudhwa National Park, India 2019

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Indian gharials, Jim Corbett National Park, India 2019fullsizeoutput_ee2.jpeg

Edited by Petter Sverke
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  • 4 months later...
Soukous

Croc infested waters

Luangwa river, Zambia

 

Croc infested waters

 

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Tom Kellie

~ @Soukous:

 

That's as apt of a photo caption as I've read.

 

Dipping a toe in those waters wouldn't be for the faint-hearted.

 

Thank you for posting that.

 

Sic transit gloria hippopotami...

 

            Tom K.

 

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MABU Photography
On 3/28/2016 at 10:40 PM, Ben mosquito said:

@KaingU Lodge , really impressive, great shot. .

 

 

Boomslang

 

 

The Boomslang is not a Boomslang, it's a spotted Bush Snake, completely harmless ....

 

 

 

 

 

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inyathi

Seeing this topic come up again, I thought I would check back and see what photos I had posted and noticed that some of my photos back at the beginning on page one, were missing, so I have reinstated those, and edited some of the information on Crocs, that I had included in my first post. At the time of posting 9 years ago, I had thought that there were only three species of African Crocodiles, the current opinion is that there are actually five.

 

Nile Crocodile (Crocodylus niloticus)

West African Crocodile (Crocodylus suchus)

West African Slender-snouted Crocodile (Mecistops cataphractus)

Central African Slender-snouted Crocodile (Mecistops leptorhynchus)

African Dwarf Crocodile (Osteolaemus tetraspis) 

 

My photos on page one, were of Central African Slender-snouted Crocs in Gabon, I’ve not seen the West African species of the Slender-snouted and missed seeing Dwarf Crocs in Gabon, I have of course seen plenty of Nile Crocs on my travels and as a consequence of visiting Zakouma NP in Chad and most recently Ghana, I have seen West African Crocs.

 

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West African Crocodile, Bahr Salamat, Zakouma National Park Chad

 

 

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The crocodile bird, Egyptian plover and West African Crocodile on the Salamat in Zakouma National Park in Chad

 

 

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Defassa Waterbuck and West African crocodiles at Tim in Zakouma National Park in Chad

 

West African Crocodiles are said to be less aggressive than Nile Crocodiles, and these crocs on the Salamat River apparently don't eat mammals only fish, the local baboons and waterbuck seemed happy to put this to the test, but I certainly wouldn't want to get too close to the water, to test this, there are some pretty big crocs.

 

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West African crocodiles at Tim on the Salamat in Zakouma National Park in Chad

Edited by inyathi
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inyathi

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West African crocodile on the Bahr Salamat in Zakouma National Park in Chad

 

The crocodiles in Zakouma as a survival strategy dig deep caves into the banks of the Salamat River when it is very hot, they will seek refuge in these caves.

 

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Crocodile Cave on the Bahr Salamat in Zakouma National Park in Chad

 

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Crocodile Cave on the Bahr Salamat in Zakouma National Park in Chad

 

In the dry season if it gets really dry, perhaps there is a drought and all of the pools have largely dried up, they may retreat deep into these caves, where they will aestivate (the hot weather equivalent of hibernation) until the rains come the rivers fill up and they can emerge once more, they can go for very long periods without food, so once underground, they will effectively just shut down for perhaps months. The Nile Crocodiles (Crocodylus niloticus) along the Katuma River in Katavi National Park in western Tanzania are particularly noted for doing this, large numbers of them will actually congregate in the same caves. I would assume that crocs must do this in various parts of Africa, but Zakouma and Katavi are the only parks where I have seen crocs in caves and Katavi is really the one park that is famous for this behaviour.

 

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This Nile Croc is swimming in liquid mud, in what is left of the Katuma River

 

 

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Not very obvious but this is the tail of a Croc in thick mud 

 

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When all the water has gone, they have no option but to walk away and look for a hole/cave or other place to shelter

 

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Not very obvious but this is the tip of a crocs tail that still sticking out of the croc cave

 

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Cropped version 

 

 

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If they don't have a suitable cave, they may just seek refuge in the shade of bushes and trees

 

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Not a great shot, whilst on a walk, we found this Nile Croc lying under a bush a long way from any water, even if it might be lacking in energy. it seemed wise not to get too close.

 

When visiting Katavi observing this interesting croc behaviour does very much depend on the weather, on my last visit the park was not nearly as dry as expected so there was far more water in all of the rivers than would normally be the case in August, so the crocs were not having a hard time, they would though still leave the water to bask in the sun or move around.

 

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Nile crocodile, Ikuu River, Katavi National Park, Tanzania

 

When they are out of the water you can see that some of them are real monsters 

 

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Nile crocodile and common hippo, Ikuu River, Katavi National Park, Tanzania

 

 

You really don't want to get too close to the water in Katavi, at least not too close to the Ikuu River

 

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Nile crocodile, Ikuu River, Katavi National Park Tanzania

Edited by inyathi
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Dave Williams
On 7/15/2021 at 9:12 AM, MABU Photography said:

 

 

The Boomslang is not a Boomslang, it's a spotted Bush Snake, completely harmless ....

 

Well, not completely harmless, my other half had a nasty shock when she found one under her suitcase in our chalet in KNP!

48951277838_680d40fa19_b.jpgGreen Spotted Bush Snake by Dave Williams, on Flickr

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Peter Connan

Beautiful Dave!

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Toxic

Wow! Just found this thread so I will enjoy going through it and looking at all the photos and descriptions have put. I started on page 6 and have finished it - thank you @Dave Williams, @inyathi, @Soukous, @Petter Sverkeand @The_Norwegian- I'm sure I'll have many more thanks to give when I go through the rest of this thread (and apologies for the flood of likes coming to everyone :lol:)

 

That photo of the black mamba is incredible and all those crocs surrounding the hippo carcass is like something out of a horror movie.  


I didn't get to see many crocs on my first safari in Sabi, and no snakes. I love crocs so whenever we're able to travel freely again I definitely want to explore the possibility of going to a place with a healthy population and a higher chance to observe.

 

I followed my guide on Instagram after my trip and he recently posted the most amazing photo of an African Rock Python, which seems like a good fit for this thread - she is HUGE!  I'll definitely be keeping an eye out overhead next time I'm on safari... hahahaha.

 

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https://www.instagram.com/p/CRJOG_fgL_Z/

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