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Game Warden

Dik-diks, Duikers, Grysbok, Klipsringer, Oribis, Steenboks, etc. Please include when and where taken, tech specs and any other pertinent details from the sighting.

 

Matt.

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marg

first, steenbok Hwange 2010 and second klipspringer Malilangwe 2013

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Game Warden

Thanks for starting us of in this topic @@marg - great shots...

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marg

@@Game Warden you are welcome and thank you!

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Game Warden

@@marg What was your camera set up?

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Treepol

Red duiker, Phinda. September 2012

 

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Damara Dik-dik, Klein Namutoni, Etosha NP. September 2014.

 

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Treepol

These 2 males were fighting over territory in Ruaha NP early one morning in July 2008. Small but feisty!

 

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Peter Connan

The biggest of the bunch: Steenbok.

 

Kgalagadi Dec 2013.

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Safaridude

gallery_6003_1115_171288.jpg

 

Common duiker (or grey duiker), Nanzhila area of Kafue Natinoal Park, Zambia, September 2011

 

 

 

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Klipspringer, Lewa Wildlife Conservancy, Kenya, January 2010

 

 

 

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Oribi, Wogakuria area of Serengeti National Park, Tanzania, September 2010

 

 

 

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Sharpe's grysbok, Nanzhila area of Kafue National Park, Zambia, September 2011

 

 

 

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Steenbok, Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park, South Africa, April 2008

 

 

 

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Vaal rhebok (or grey rhebok), Bontebok National Park, South Africa, March 2011

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marg

@@Game Warden..okay

the steenbok, Nikon D70, ISO 250, 300mm, f5.6 and 1/200

 

the klipspringer, Nikon D7000, ISO 1800, 260 mm, f5.6 and 1/1,600

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Wild Dogger

Sharpe´s Grysbok

gallery_5715_552_36284.jpg

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Caracal

gallery_6223_1125_57980.jpg

 

Oribi - Lubungu area Kafue National Park August 2014

 

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Oribi Nkala GMA near Ngoma Kafue NP - August 2011

 

@@Safaridude - Are there subspeciesof oribi that do not have the black tail and the black spot under the ear that I've always associated with them. I ask this as your beautiful Serengeti oribi does not appear to have these?

 

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Common duiker- Nanzhila area Kafue National Park September 2014

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Safaridude

@@Caracal

 

That is a very keen observation!

 

There are 13 races of oribi (Ourebia ourebi) described, but only one is considered unique enough: Haggard oribi (Ourebia ourebi haggardi) found in Somalia and coastal Kenya in the north. The other 12 are usually bunched and described as common oribi.

 

That said, the Serengeti oribi (Ourebia ourebi cottoni) is more rufous than the others and has a tail that has a tan upper-side and white underside.

Edited by Safaridude

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Caracal

@@Safaridude

 

Until I saw your photo I thought from reading Estes Safari Companion and the drawing in Kingon's Pocket Guide that all oribi had the black tail.

I had no idea that there were different races of oribi with some different features. Thanks for this informative and interesting answer to my query.

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Tom Kellie

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~ @Safaridude:

 

The image above appeals to me because of the mix of vegetation, with varying textures and hues.

The alert male Vaal Rhebok in the foreground stands out due to his stance, horns and eye.

It's a subtle yet superb image.

I was glad to find your set of smaller antelopes as I've been reading about them in field guides but had a poor sense of what they looked like.

I also wanted to confirm what was for me a first-ever sighting of a Steenbok, last weekend in Masai Mara.

Your photo greatly helped in the identification, as it unmistakably shows the slightly arched quality of the back.

Thank you for such clear photography.

Tom K.

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Tom Kellie

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Resting Steenbok



Photographed on 3 May, 2015 at 11:46 am in Masai Mara National Reserve, Kenya by an EOS 1D Mark IV camera with an EF 400mm f/2.8L IS II super telephoto lens.



ISO 12,800, 1/6400 sec., 400mm focal length, handheld Manual exposure.



We observed three separate Raphicerus campestris, Steenbok, within a fifteen minute period. Two females, one male, all solitary in long grass beside the track.



Although there were other images of this female walking, I liked this photo showing her nestled down in the grass and wildflowers, her limpid eyes observing the photographer.








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Morkel Erasmus

Always love seeing these cuties!

 

This Steenbok was photographed on the red dunes of the Kgalagadi.

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gagan

I am confused about springbok , impala , thomson gazelle , grant gazelle

 

All look alike ..how to differentiate..??

 

There can be many more which look similar. ..

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TonyQ

@@Morkel Erasmus

What a stunningly beautiful photograph (and animal!)

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Game Warden

@@Bugs, was it the male steenbok which Ken Barker described as the poor man's buffalo?

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Tom Kellie

Always love seeing these cuties!

 

This Steenbok was photographed on the red dunes of the Kgalagadi.

 

post-49296-0-69545300-1432848908_thumb.jpg

~ @@Morkel Erasmus

 

The fly on the forehead offers a sense of scale.

Beautiful image — much appreciated!

Tom K.

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Game Warden
The fly on the forehead offers a sense of scale.

I didn't even notice that. Thanks for pointing it out @@Tom Kellie

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Bugs

@@Bugs, was it the male steenbok which Ken Barker described as the poor man's buffalo?

 

He was talking about a bushbuck.

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Tom Kellie

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Afternoon Visitor



Photographed at 4:54 pm on 28 April, 2014 in Samburu National Reserve, Kenya, using an EOS 1D X camera and an EF 400mm f/2.8L IS II super-telephoto lens.


ISO 200, 1/80 sec., f/4, 400mm focal length, handheld Manual exposure.


*****************************************************************************************************


Stock-still on the track...no twitching...no tail-flicking...no blinking. Utterly motionless. What thoughts pass through its mind? What emotions are stirred by our presence?


The delicacy of the hooves and legs, so petite in scale, contrast with the magnificent eyes which must provide superb vision. Seeing such an organism never cloys, never disappoints.


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Antee

Let´s put some Ugandan Kob in here.

 

Capture in beautiful Murchison Falls NP , Uganda

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Edited by Antee

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