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    • janzin
      Fantastic sighting! Wow it would have been incredible to see tigers mating, I was just thinking the other day we've seen lions and leopards mate, but never tigers.  But even so, a great sighting, too bad Phil missed it!  
    • KaliCA
      The story with the two Kisily tigers continues...   (Sorry for the poor pics from my videos, but as you remember, my photographer is sick at home. Of course, I'm sorry now that I didn't bring along his long lens and learned the basics of using it, but no use crying about this now)   The dirty female tigress is walking towards us, then stops to check us out before veering off behind us. She is walking below the road, looks in our direction and then comes back into the road.       At one point she is looking up into the forest for quite a while.   The male tiger is now becoming visible on a rocky outcrop. He is peering intently down to the road in the direction of the tigress. It looks as though the two tigers are looking at each other, but I can't be sure.      The lady is moving cooly down the road, and we follow. Then she lies down in a submissive way and looks up into the forest.       She moves her tail aside and I’m guessing that she is ready to mate. She moves along the road for another few steps and is whipping her tail from side to side.   Clearly, she is ready to mate, but the tiger on the ledge is not understanding her message, or he is too shy to come down with the three gypsies around the tigress. In any case, he walks through the forest and marks a few trees, before he sprints across the road and climbs the hill in back of the Gaurs. It all went too fast for me to catch it on video. Sadly, there is no meeting of the two tigers as I had hoped. CB is joking and says the male didn't want her because she is too dirty! Later, the female veers off the road as well and lies down about 20 meters from the road looking intently in the direction the male tiger has left.           We wait a few more minutes and then it’s time to leave for home. That was a wonderful last Kanha Tiger sighting and I’m so sorry Phil has missed this. It was extremely interesting to see the behavior of those two adult tigers and I felt privileged to have witness that in the wilds of India.  On the way home, CB is teasing me and says, "Do you still think there is nothing happening in this zone?" He keeps saying, "You just never know when a tiger will pop up." I guess he is right about that.  It’s a long way back through the forest and we get home in the dark with the headlights on.  Phil is much better and without a fever. I tell him the story and show him the videos of the two tigers. He is happy for me that I had a last good sighting here. He decides that he is well enough to have dinner together and tonight it’s outside under a Banyan tree. We get served our usual food, vegetable fried rice, sautéed veggies, and Manchurian chicken which never looks the same and never tastes the same.  It’s become a joke between us.   Tomorrow we will fly back to Delhi and then start the third leg of our trip to Haridwar and the Jim Corbett NP. More tigers to come...
    • kittykat23uk
      It didn't really feel anywhere near as busy as Yala. But that could have been due to the fact that everyone in Yala was concentrated at that leopard sighting whereas in Wilpattu, the only sort of crowded sighting was the leopard on the river bank. If I had to choose between the two I would rather go back to Wilpattu. 
    • TonyQ
      @kittykat23ukthank you for a very enjoyable report. You had really good sightings. I have not been to Willapatu-it looks like a lovely park. Was it busy when you were there?
    • wilddog
    • Galana
      I think they must have as the weather also turned dreich! But I did dodge the showers to do some 'externals' of our hut.   The setting down to Knapdale and Mull of Kintyre, on a clear day.   Wildcat cottage (akas "The Bide awee Rest home". Spacious indeed.   Sitting out area with covered BBQ, midges permitting.   A friendly Siskin drops by to dry out.   No such luck for the Heron but the sawbill is not bothered.   The ultimate madness. D.I.F. We are on the largest raised peat bog in Scotland.   Initial report is that the bed is one of the nicest we have used. It redeems the rest of the place which, sadly, could be better.   Mustn't complain.  
    • kittykat23uk
      We are so familiar with them in stately homes and the like in the UK, but when you see them in their natural habitat that is something else!  
    • kittykat23uk
      On the way back we encountered either the same or another Golden Jackal as we drove the forest section. Birds seen included some nice views of an Oriental Magpie-robin. We also had a nice view of a Red Muntjac.   P2196056 Golden Jackal by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2196109 Golden Jackal by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2196112 Golden Jackal by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2196132 Oriental magpie-robin by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2196128 Oriental magpie-robin by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2196145 Oriental magpie-robin by Jo Dale, on Flickr   IMG_20240219_115045 Wilpattu by Jo Dale, on Flickr   IMG_20240219_115120 Wilpattu by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2196178 Red muntjac deer by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2196192 Red muntjac deer by Jo Dale, on Flickr   A Ruddy Mongoose had caught itself a breakfast of a hapless monitor lizard. Views were a bit distant and obscured by branches.        P2196229 Ruddy Mongoose by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2196220 Ruddy Mongoose by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2196243 Ruddy Mongoose by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2196270 Ruddy Mongoose by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2196273 Ruddy Mongoose by Jo Dale, on Flickr   With that last sighting in the bag it was time to leave the park and head back to the lodge for lunch and to pack. A Greater Coucal and the Malabar Pied Hornbills were hanging around.    P2196366 Greater Coucal by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2196373 Malabar Pied Hornbill by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2196385 Malabar Pied Hornbill by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2196406 Malabar Pied Hornbill by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2196419  Malabar Pied Hornbill by Jo Dale, on Flickr   We spent our last night at the Goldi Sands Beach Hotel, Negombo. Chin said his goodbyes to us and advised us that Suresh would be back in the morning to take us to the airport.    We had a little wander along the beach but there wasn’t a lot going on there and the constant pestering by hawkers didn’t really make for a pleasant experience. So I decided to have a swim in the pool instead. We enjoyed the buffet dinner and then got an early night.    P2196485 House Crow by Jo Dale, on Flickr   IMG_20240219_174435 beach near Colombo by Jo Dale, on Flickr   IMG_20240219_174348 beach near Colombo by Jo Dale, on Flickr   IMG_20240220_070920  beach near Colombo by Jo Dale, on Flickr   Our journey home the following day was uneventful and we arrived back in the UK on time. 
    • kittykat23uk
      Overlooking the lake we came across a whole tree full of pelicans. A few Water Buffalo were feeding on the meadows. We took a route around a wooded pond where we found a Grey-headed Fish Eagle drying off. Suitably dry, it took off and flew away from us over the pond, backlit by the sun.   P2195474 Grey-headed Fish Eagle by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2195511 Grey-headed Fish Eagle by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2195514 Grey-headed Fish Eagle by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2195552 Grey-headed Fish Eagle by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2195546 Grey-headed Fish Eagle by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2195549 Grey-headed Fish Eagle by Jo Dale, on Flickr   Some large crocodiles were also spotted either in the lakes or on the shore. A Woolly-necked stork was seen sunning itself with its wings akimbo, his metallic purple plumage catching the light and sparkling in the morning sun.   P2195580 Crocodile by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2195610  Asian woolly-necked stork by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2195629 Asian woolly-necked stork by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2195629 Asian woolly-necked stork by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2195640 Asian woolly-necked stork by Jo Dale, on Flickr   As we carried on through the forest, we were delighted to see a Golden Jackal trotting straight towards us along the road. Seemingly uncaring of our presence, it trotted in and out of the forest as it partolled its territory.   P2195761 Golden Jackal by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2195758 Golden Jackal by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2195767 Golden Jackal by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2195770 Golden Jackal by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2195772 Golden Jackal by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2195804 Golden Jackal by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2195814 Golden Jackal by Jo Dale, on Flickr   We then arrived at the centre point for our breakfast. I asked Chin if there were any good spots for stripe-necked mongoose, the last of our daytime mammal targets. To my surprise, Chin said that the place where we’d had all those waterbirds the previous day was where he had been looking for the mongoose. It would have been helpful if we’d have known that at the time as I might have focused more on looking on the ground had I known this!    P2195872 Dryzone Toque Macaque by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2195886 Dryzone Toque Macaque by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2195912 Dryzone Toque Macaque by Jo Dale, on Flickr   IMG_20240219_095444_1 Wilpattu by Jo Dale, on Flickr   IMG_20240219_095447 Wilpattu by Jo Dale, on Flickr   IMG_20240219_095537  Wilpattu by Jo Dale, on Flickr   IMG_20240219_095546 Wilpattu by Jo Dale, on Flickr   IMG_20240219_095555 Wilpattu by Jo Dale, on Flickr   IMG_20240219_100741 Wilpattu by Jo Dale, on Flickr   IMG_20240219_104438 Wilpattu by Jo Dale, on Flickr   IMG_20240219_104443  Wilpattu by Jo Dale, on Flickr   IMG_20240219_104450  Wilpattu by Jo Dale, on Flickr   IMG_20240219_104458  Wilpattu by Jo Dale, on Flickr  
    • AndrewB
      Peacocks up in trees is one of my abiding memories of a lovely trip to Sri Lanka a few years ago. I had never thought of Peacock flying and then roosting high up in a tree before!
    • kittykat23uk
      Day 17 Wilpattu to Colombo   We had originally been meant to be leaving today on the lunchtime flight, but having looked at Google maps it was suggesting that we would have needed to leave very early in the morning (probably as soon as we got back from our night drive) in order to make that connection, so we judiciously decided to add an extra night and spend that close to the airport. This meant that we had time to have a final morning in the park. Had I just had myself to consider I would have been even happier having a full day in the park and getting to the hotel later at night but Eric wanted a more leisurely end to our stay so a half day it was!   P2194839 Golden-backed woodpecker aka Black-rumped flameback by Jo Dale, on Flickr   Before we even entered the park we had nice views of a pair of woodpeckers, one was a Golden-backed woodpecker aka Black-rumped flameback, one was a  Red-backed Woodpecker. It was interesting to see the two together on the same tree. Apparently they sometimes intergrade in the north west of Sri Lanka.   P2194843 Golden-backed woodpecker aka Black-rumped flameback by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2194908 Golden-backed woodpecker aka Black-rumped flameback by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2194943 Golden-backed woodpecker aka Black-rumped flameback by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2194946 Golden-backed woodpecker aka Black-rumped flameback by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2194977 Golden-backed woodpecker aka Black-rumped flameback by Jo Dale, on Flickr On entering the park we first encountered some chital, White Ibis and a lovely Peacock posing on a branch. A pair of  Orange-breasted Green Pigeon glowed in the morning sun. We stopped for a perched Grey-headed Fish Eagle and then a pair of Indian Grey Mongoose entertained us for a while. I tried to focus on getting some scenic shots of Wilpattu, knowing that this was our last chance to do so and it was such a pretty park.    P2194988 Chital (spotted deer) by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2195001 White Ibis by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2195005 Indian Peafowl / Peacock by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2195046 Indian Peafowl / Peacock by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2195096 Chital (spotted deer) by Jo Dale, on Flickr   IMG_20240219_072344  Wilpattu by Jo Dale, on Flickr   IMG_20240219_072419  Wilpattu by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2195112 Orange-breasted green pigeon by Jo Dale, on Flickr   IMG_20240219_073141  Wilpattu by Jo Dale, on Flickr   IMG_20240219_073148 Wilpattu by Jo Dale, on Flickr   IMG_20240219_073154  Wilpattu by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2195148 Grey-headed fish eagle by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2195286 Indian Grey Mongooses by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2195290 Indian Grey Mongooses by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2195304 Indian Grey Mongooses by Jo Dale, on Flickr   IMG_20240219_074618 Wilpattu by Jo Dale, on Flickr   IMG_20240219_074626  Wilpattu by Jo Dale, on Flickr   IMG_20240219_074640 Wilpattu by Jo Dale, on Flickr   IMG_20240219_074647  Wilpattu by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2195350 Pelicans by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2195355 Pelicans by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2195364 Wilpattu by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2195365 Wilpattu by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2195369 Lesser Adjutant by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2195409 Water buffalo by Jo Dale, on Flickr    
    • kittykat23uk
      Heading on into a more remote area of the park we came up onto an embankment overlooking marshes and ponds. In one particular pond, a whole host of waterbirds had gathered with dozens of Lesser Adjutant, Painted Storks, Spotted-billed Pelicans, egrets of varying kinds, and White Ibis. It was an incredible sight!    P2184043 Lesser Adjutant & Painted Storks by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2184070 Spotted-billed Pelicans,  Lesser Adjutant & Painted Storks by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2184062 Spotted-billed Pelicans & Painted Storks by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2184079 Spotted-billed Pelicans by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2184167_02 Spotted-billed Pelican by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2184171 Spotted-billed Pelican by Jo Dale, on Flickr   By now it was getting on for lunchtime and the heat haze was getting really harsh. We started to head back to the central picnic point for lunch.  In the haze in the distance we did find a small herd of elephants but the punishing haze killed any chance of getting a good view or decent shot.    P2184168 Spotted-billed Pelican by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2184163 Spotted-billed Pelican by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2184172 Spotted-billed Pelican by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2184160 Spotted-billed Pelican by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2184187 Spotted-billed Pelican by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2184196 Spotted-billed Pelican by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2184189 Spotted-billed Pelican by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2184230 Spotted-billed Pelican by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2184249 Lesser Adjutant & Painted Storks, White Ibis by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2184272 Spotted-billed Pelican by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2184303 Lesser Adjutant by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2184320  Painted Storks by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2184324 Lesser Adjutant & Painted Storks by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2184331_01  Painted Stork & Lesser Adjutant by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2184330_01  Painted Stork & Lesser Adjutant by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2184337  Painted Stork & Lesser Adjutant, Spot-billed Pelicans by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2184351  Painted Stork & Lesser Adjutant by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2184360  White Ibis, Painted Stork & Lesser Adjutant by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2184391_01 Painted Storks by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2184403 Painted Storks & White Ibis by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2184408 Painted Storks by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2184415 Indian Elephant by Jo Dale, on Flickr   We also had a mystery bird, which after further examination of photos was identified as a steppe Buzzard. Crested Serpent Eagles were clearly also feeling the heat and one was flat on the road sunbathing. We encountered another White-rumped Shama.    P2184470 Crested Serpent Eagle by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2184501 Crested Serpent Eagle by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2184505 Crested Serpent Eagle by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2184536 Crested Serpent Eagle by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2184553 Crested Serpent Eagle by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2184593 Crested Serpent Eagle by Jo Dale, on Flickr   IMG_20240218_133921 Wilpattu by Jo Dale, on Flickr   IMG_20240218_150410 Wilpattu by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2184602_02 White-rumped Shama by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2184632 White-rumped Shama by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2184642 White-rumped Shama by Jo Dale, on Flickr   We did get word of another leopard but it was flat and very obscured when we arrived on the scene so we didn’t linger on the sighting.    P2184669 Very obscured leopard by Jo Dale, on Flickr     An Indian Star Tortoise gave us a nicer view as it ambled along a shortly cropped area of grass. It was a fairly quiet afternoon otherwise and it was soon time to leave the park.  A herd of chital were feeding opposite the lodge and I also thought I heard an elephant crashing around in the undergrowth some distance away. It did not materialise however.       P2184706 Indian Star Tortoise by Jo Dale, on Flickr   Our last night drive produced Brown Fish Owl, Indian and Jerdon’s Nightjars, another Indian Crested Porcupine and a Small Indian Civet. Chin was clearly really very tired this night (as were we all) and kept drifting off in the car. In the end we decided to call it a night. As we were heading back into the lodge we spotted the eyeshine of another cat, Eric and I quickly identified it as one of the feral lodge cats but I think in desperation Chin really tried to turn it into a rusty-spotted cat! I think if we had given it any longer Eric would have got out of the jeep and walked the short distance back to the lodge, but at this point Chin admitted defeat and we returned to our beds in the knowledge that our last chances for fishing cat, rusty spotted cat and pangolin were now gone.   P2184720 Sunset by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2184726 Chital (Spotted deer) by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2184726 Chital (Spotted deer) by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2184755 Brown Fish Owl by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2184779 Small Indian Civet by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2184800 Indian Nightjar by Jo Dale, on Flickr   P2184807 Jerdon's nightjar by Jo Dale, on Flickr
    • Galana
      Oh, shoot! Vangat is the clincher for me. My kind of place.  I can see India climbing back up the stem of my marigold. Now I need to correlate it with my diary.   Great birds from my balcony ticks the final box.
    • Kitsafari
      Gorgeous views. Gorgeous birds. Gorgeous photos.     
    • KaliCA
      At 2:30 I’m going out alone again on my last game drive in Kanha NP.  At first, Phil is thinking about joining but he is still very weak and sleepy, so he is staying in the cabin to rest and sleep some more.  We are assigned the Kisily track, a new one. We see a few birds, and it's quite a rollercoaster ride as it is steep up and down and around bends in deep forest.   We stop for a few Barasinga Deer grazing in a waterhole. and there is a “toilet” as well. The driver points to a woven fence put into a semi-circle with an opening. Inside there is the dirt floor covered with leaves and toilet paper and some wet spots. Well, that's a first... I mention to CB that there is not that much to see along this track.  We stop at a bridge and there is an alarm call by a Barasinga Deer, CB says.  Not 5 minutes later, a female very muddy tiger appears and walks parallel to the water and then disappears behind brush. Well, that was very nice, but also very short. We wait a little longer, but then continue driving. (Again, I'm bad at taking pictures with my Lumix, so I'm showing you equally bad video stills. I really miss Phil and his photography skills in what is to come...so the pictures are mainly there to illustrate the story)   Soon, there is another alarm call by a Barasinga deer and CB says,”Tiger in the road!” Sweeter words were never spoken, and I see a huge male crossing in front of another Gypsy. He walks up to our right into greenery and lies down behind a tree trunk. I can just make out his ears moving once in a while and can see the black spot on one ear.   We wait for him to get up. Then all of a sudden, there is an alarm call behind us and the five Gaurs across the road who have been grazing peacefully, lift their heads and stop eating.   When I look back at the male, I see him moving, sitting down and peering intently into the undergrowth. What has caught his attention?     I follow his gaze and see a second tiger approaching through the trees.   I see it wallowing in the dead leaves, sit up, then stepping out into the road.     The tiger is marking a tree and then steps out into the open.     Wait a minute: I see a muddy tiger.... as CB whispers, "It's the dirty female." Yes, indeed, it's the muddy female tiger from earlier on the bridge. She walks in the road towards us for a while and I can finally see a beautiful tiger face without any obstructions! She may be dirty, but she is beautiful none the less.   Story to be continued...      
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