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    • John M.
      Awesome collection. I especially like the lechwe herd in the green landscape. The older I get, the more appealing are the 'atmospheric' images for want of a better word.    For me, fewer eyes in a vehicle were often an upside😊
    • Atravelynn
    • Atravelynn
      It's good the lion shots and "getting bogged in shots" did not overlap.  Kids at sunset (or sunrise) photo is lovely.  All of your family shots are brochure quality!   We all felt like we were in a movie on the dog hunt.  That lead dog is such a beautiful muted color.  You got dogs in the midst, in the sun, then the sunset, in a row, on the hunt, through the meadows, even engaged in greeting.  The dogs and giraffe shot is almost comical for the discrepancy in size.  What a repertoire.   Roan and sable, both a treat.   Nice job on the knob-nosed duck taking off.  Flock of flying ground hornbills, wow!
    • Galana
      That's it. We are packing the car for the drive home.   We spent a quiet day.   Quite dull.   Had a walk up the Glen and then bid goodbye to the local Ospreys and wished them well. Caught them both having time off from the kids. Ma   Pa.   Some more squirrels from the other day when the Goshawk nearly got lucky but stayed hungry.   She was out playing the high wire and attracted unwelcome, to her, attention.   A goshawk whizzzed in but the feeding birds all alarmed so the squirrel leaped to the tree trunk screened from the attack, And hid frozen still out os sight for severla minutes. I got lots of no movement.   Then when the birds all came back, out she came and resumed her showing off act. Byee!   So now the drive tomorrow. and home.    
    • Zubbie15
      Thanks for sharing @janzin, you had challenges but lots of rewards too! 
    • pomkiwi
      @AtravelynnThank-you. Yes it was good to spend time with my son. We previously got together to photograph bears in Alaska and plan to meet next February to go to Yellowstone.
    • janzin
      Our last safari day started off with a bang. In fact--a Bajrang. Yes, that's the name of the gorgeous male tiger we saw within minutes of starting our safari. The name means "Strong man" and is also one of the many alternate names of the god Hanuman, known for his strength. He is about 8 or 9 years old.   Unfortunately, we were not the first ones there and this was actually the only truly "crowded" sighting of our trip. We were behind other gypsies--in the second row, so to speak--and so I had to stand on the seat and try to get photos. To compound things, he was in the tall grass.   But he was magnificent!     He was in and out of grassy patches and a few times he came out a bit into the open. Of course all the gypsies were jostling and trying to follow but at times we couldn't move.       I kept hoping he would look our way, and finally he did, for a moment.     Wow what a great way to start the day!  We (and it seems everyone else) more or less played hide and seek with this tiger most of the day; returning to this area where he was still somewhere hiding in the grass. A few times we caught glimpses and heard from others that they saw him again, but we never got a better look.   At this point, we were more relaxed about finding tigers and stopped more often to photograph birds.   We'd seen many Green Bee-eaters during the trip but this time I finally asked to stop and get some photos.   Back...     and front.     Likewise, stopped for these common birds.           Since we were leaving early the next morning, and still had to re-pack, we decided once again to return to the lodge for lunch. We also didn't want to be too exhausted. Now you might think it was a waste of money to pay for the full day and return for lunch anyway, but we still found it to be advantageous--that extra 15 minutes in the morning and afternoon really made a bigger difference than you'd expect; and the ability to go between zones made it worthwhile as well. And we did return to the gate after the lunch break somewhat earlier than the afternoon safari-goers were allowed in.   After lunch, we again checked the grassy area for Bajrang; ran into a photography group that had been parked there pretty much all day (they had a full-day permit as well); but they had only caught glimpses.  He was still in there, but not showing himself. So after a bit we moved on, deciding to return late in the afternoon when it was cooler and he might start moving.    Meantime, more birds.   We'd seen many Jungle Owlets but here for some reason they seemed more skittish than in other places, taking flight at the first sight of the vehicle. This one however sat for a moment for a portrait.     I can't leave you without one more Crested Serpent Eagle LOL!     A Sambar in nice light in the marsh.     Late in the afternoon Rajen asked if we wanted to go see the famous statue of Lord Vishnu which is situated up a small rocky hill.  Sure!  we climbed the hill in the gypsy to a small parking area, where we then climbed some steps to the statue, situated in a forested glen alongside a murky pond.     The statue is abut 35 feet long, and is known as the Sheshshaiya statue. It is a holy site to Hindus who come to pay tribute to Lord Vishnu. The statue, carved out of sandstone, dates back to the 10th century and symbolizes the origin of the Charanganga River, which flows through Bandhavgarh. Here is the plaque which gives more details.     Rajen told us a funny story of a certain proprietor of Wild World India who drank from the water here, and got violently ill. We won't mention names   Rajen and Alan pose.     After this interesting interlude, we headed down for a last look for Bajrang. Arriving at the grassy area there already were several other gypsies with the same idea.  Apparently now there was word of another tiger, a female, also in the grass!   We actually caught a glimpse of her but impossible to photograph.  We drove around the area a few times, when suddenly we saw several vehicles going at high speed up ahead. Well, you know what that means! Sure enough there was a tiger...I don't think it was Bajrang but can't even be sure...moving up the hillside at a rather rapid pace. There was no way to take any photos as he was moving fast, as were we...bounding along...we tried to get ahead where we thought he might come down off the hill, but instead, he (or it may have been she, don't know) went deeper into the forest. Sigh. That was our last tiger sighting.   By now it was almost dark and we soon had to exit. But there was one last treat. This Brown Fish Owl was hunting right by the road, and in the near dusk his eyes shone bright.     Saying goodbye to Bandhavgarh...       The END.  All in all a successful trip, despite the lows of Alan getting sick and the near-disaster with the camera. Next time though, it will be back to Ranthambhore, my happy place, no matter what!    
    • janzin
    • Zim Girl
      Enjoyed reading this report @TonyQ.  Great variety of places visited and birds seen - wonderful!
    • Bush dog
      So we went back to where we came from and found the couple there.              
    • Galana
      The second outing was to the head waters of the famous whisky river from which Speyside Malts are named. Makes one get a dry throat just writing about it.   So up we went to see where the water that makes the critter comes from.   And here it is.   Ready for bottling after a modest treatment and passage of a few years. I can wait.     We also passed the more famous Harry Potter Bridge where he faught a famous battle to keep the source pure by hiding the infant river from those who soght to do evil to Scotland's economy. See the book. Harry Potter and the Brig tae naewhere due out next year.
    • wilddog
    • Atravelynn
      You did more than chase the cats.  You found 'em!  And much more.  As a couple of ST reports inspired you, this action-packed report will certainly inspire others.  You were wise to book when you could get your guide of choice.  April turned out well.  Splurging for the thermal imaging monocular also likely increased your success.  Thanks for the hint on that device.   Your excellent shots cover felines, birds, reptiles and more, but the shot of you and your wife in front of the vehicle really displays your enthusiasm and passion for this kind of adventure. Another accomplishment of your guide, I bet.   Nature documentary stuff here!
    • Atravelynn
      @wilddogand I will just have to return to India and visit 4 parks, so we can distinguish our report from yours with term QUAD in the title.  Hey...you've got me thinking now.  That's not a bad idea.
    • Atravelynn
      I am sweating just looking at your thermometer.  But those very early starts in Nov proved fruitful.  The elephants must have felt the heat too and enjoyed some extra splashing.  They were very playful for you.  The  colors of Violet-backed Starling and Chameleon on the road really pop.  Your arrival aerial shots are superb too.  Sable firsts, and nicely grouped!!   How wonderful you could have such an action-packed father-son getaway.
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