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offshorebirder

Show us your Otters

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elefromoz

@@Patty, great to see on the beach, I'd never thought of them doing that.

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Patty

@@Patty, great to see on the beach, I'd never thought of them doing that.

 

I had no idea until I went to Moss Landing for the first time. I initially thought there was an injured otter until I read the sign :)

Edited by Patty

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offshorebirder

 

When I lived in CA I used to love visiting Point Lobos and adjacent Garrapata State Park.

 

 

I try to go to Point Lobos weekly and love hiking in Sobranes Canyon.

 

Sadly both are currently closed and Sobranes Canyon is on fire right now :(

 

 

I saw in the news that there was a wildfire at Garrapata State Park - so sorry to hear that! Especially since the rains are so far away...

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offshorebirder

Yesterday I had a wonderful day in the field at Santee National Wildlife Refuge in South Carolina. One of the highlights was an encounter with a River Otter (Lontra canadensis).

 

At first it was snoozing on a grassy dike between a freshwater marsh and a lily pad-covered pond. It was partially facing away from me, and the wind was in my favor, so I was able to sneak a little closer after spotting it.

 

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Then it woke up and sat up a bit, scanning the area drowsily.

 

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Then, perhaps hearing the shutter of my camera clicking, it glanced in my direction.

 

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Unconcerned by my low-key presence, he began marking his territory (I presume it was a male)

 

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After using his scent glad to mark the dike, he scuffed his back feet and ambled over and down into the water. I felt privileged to be semi-accepted by the otter - or at least not viewed as a threat.

 

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Patty

Another one from Moss Landing this morning

 

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monalisa

Ooo! I have something contribute!!

 

Giant river otters - They are so funny because they always look grumpy

 

5f5Wrt3h.jpg

 

 

In case you were wondering what the inside of an otter's mouth looked like

 

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I like this one because it's carrying a new pup

 

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I've never seen the furry river otters before, but I really really really want to!! They are seriously cute.

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wschulte

African clawless otter seen in the Kafue National Park in Zambia, 21-02-2014

They are terribly nice to watch: playful, curious and fast.

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Edited by wschulte

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CheetahFan

This isn't an image, but I thought I would link to some video I took of giant river otters in the Pantanal last year, in case anyone is interested in watching them on land for 8 minutes!

 

EDIT: Sorry I just realised there is a separate section for posting videos!

 

 

Edited by CheetahFan
Wrong place to put videos

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wilddog

No problem @CheetahFan It sits well here.

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Tom Kellie
On 8/24/2017 at 7:04 AM, Patty said:

Another one from Moss Landing this morning

 

large.IMG_0912.JPG.371b19cded76f4ffef0bb

 

~ @Patty

 

What a terrific shot!

 

You've captured the ideal “off-duty otter” image.

 

I love it!

 

Thank you for posting this!

 

Tom K.

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offshorebirder

@Tom Kellie - I hope you can access these photos as well.

 

Yesterday afternoon I was able to get away from work with a little daylight left.  I joined my friend Matt, whose father-in-law is a co-owner of a big (12,000+ acre) wildlife and hunting preserve about 50 minutes drive south of Charleston..  

 

After birding around for an hour and a half and seeing good stuff (covey of Northern Bobwhite Quail, family of endangered Red-cockaded Woodpeckers), near sundown we walked out on the dike of a former ricefield.   The former ricefield is now maintained as waterbird habitat; the dike separates the impoundment from the tidal marsh.  We had planned to play some rail vocalizations to see if we could get responses and get an idea how many and what kind were in the vicinity.  

 

I heard some splashing and quiet grunting, looked down in the tiny creek that runs from the dike outflow into the marsh proper and saw three North American River Otters (Lontra canadensis) feeding voraciously.    They were eating Striped Mullet (Mugil cephalus) one after the other, with much gusto, smacking of lips, and soft grunts (perhaps a combination contact call and expression of gustatory delight like a duck's feed chatter?).

 

They were only 8-9 meters from us, at a height of about 3 meters lower.  We were slow and unobtrusive and they did not seem to mind us.

 

I had left my tripod behind, and I had a 400mm f/4 lens with a 1.4 extender (giving me only f/5.6 at 560 mm).   I also left my camera bag back at the guest house and did not even have a ziplock bag or anything to put the extender in if I removed it.   So I was stuck with very little fading light, at close range (could not see them if we moved back), with an extender on a lens that was not super-fast to begin with.   At least I had a Canon 5DmkIV which is pretty good at high ISO.

 

RiverOtter1_Cheeha-Combahee_1-10-2019_10x9b.jpg.1fec8d3a959f04a543f8051f43e9df96.jpg

 

RiverOtter2_Cheeha-Combahee_1-10-2019_20x11b.jpg.76393b91a36736c8cf74971b082fbfac.jpg

 

-- After the Otters withdrew we did kick-start a widspread "rail conversation" throughout the adjoining freshwater and tidal marshes:  6 King Rails, eight Clapper Rails, two Virginia Rails and one Sora.

 

Edited by offshorebirder

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Tom Kellie
5 minutes ago, offshorebirder said:

@Tom Kellie - I hope you can access these photos as well.

-- After the Otters withdrew we did kick-start a widspread "rail conversation" throughout the adjoining freshwater and tidal marshes:  6 King Rails, eight Clapper Rails, two Virginia Rails and one Sora.

 

~ @offshorebirder

 

Happily, Yes! Both otter images came through clearly, with splendid detail.

 

Thank you so much! This has unexpectedly been the otter thread's day.

 

What a glorious time in the field for you and your friend.

 

That property sounds like a superbly maintained wildlife habitat.

 

The bonus was the presence of rails and a sora.

 

This type of up-to-the-minute local report brings energy to Safaritalk.

 

Many, many thanks for the images and the information.

 

Tom K.

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melproffit

Olympic Peninsula, WA 2011

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kittykat23uk

Giant otters, Porto Jofre, Brazil

45451390451_0563549f58_b.jpgP9261348 Giant Otters by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

Neotropical Otters, Barranco Alto, Brazil

44623605624_2e6abaecd5_b.jpgP9201325 Don't look now, but.. we are being watched... by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

Eurasian Otter, Norwich UK

5278256696_b26eaa9066_b.jpgPC205971 otter1 by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

Sea otter, Hokkaido, Japan

26362994607_9a03e3e0da_b.jpgP3012577 Sea Otter by Jo Dale, on Flickr

 

Smooth-coated Otter, Kinabatangan, Borneo

13745183633_4b41914062_b.jpgP3233788 Smooth-coated Otter by Jo Dale, on Flickr

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