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offshorebirder
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Towlersonsafari

Whilst lookin through and culling some older photo's i came across some otters we saw on Mull in April 2017 that, with the dxo sotware, don't seem too bad

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@Towlersonsafari

It's very good!  I like the framing.  

It looks a little, even a lot to the neotropical otter that can be seen in the Pantanal.

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Towlersonsafari

Thank you @Bush dog. i have only ever seen otters in the Uk! We do our otter watching on Mull mostly from the car- my days of being stealthy and sneaking down to hide behind a rock and get very close, over slippery seaweed -if they ever existed- are long gone! Also it it means we can view them and not disturb them- we do tend to watch first and then try to take photo's, and on Mull there are good paces where you can do that and not disturb the otters or the locals!

In fact Mull has become comparatively busy, especially the Loch na Keal area so we tend to look for them in other equally good places-they are  always such  uplifting sightings

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  • 2 weeks later...

Another recommendation for Mull. I spent a week there earlier this month on a trip with two other photographers and a guide with the main aim of photographing otters. We saw several otters every day but not always close to or in positions where we could approach them without causing disturbance. On our last afternoon however we were able to spend 4 hours lying in wet seaweed in the rain with this very relaxed male:

 

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4 hours ago, pomkiwi said:

On our last afternoon however we were able to spend 4 hours lying in wet seaweed in the rain with this very relaxed male:

Things we will do to watch wildlife!!  Beautiful picture!

 

 

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  • 7 months later...

On my safari to Chad back in Feb/March, whilst staying at Tinga Lodge in Zakouma National Park, I made the very silly mistake of setting up my trail camera on a small ground spike, I knew that there were plenty of Olive Baboons around the lodge and should have thought don’t use the spike, use the strap and attach the camera to a tree. Inevitably the baboons messed around with my camera, on the last occasion I was surprised to discover that one of them had managed to shear the screw off the top of the spike, rendering the spike useless, the broken screw was left in the base of camera, I feared it might have to be drilled out, if I ever wanted to use the camera on a spike again, when I investigated it at home, I found to my relief that I was in fact able to quite easily unscrew it and get it out, the camera itself seemed to be entirely undamaged.

 

The loss of the spike was a bit of a bore, but conveniently I already had a second much larger spike that I’d not used very much, so I didn’t need to go online and order a replacement spike, I hoped I could just get by with the bigger spike, it’s longer and heavier than my broken one so I wouldn’t want to take it on my travels, but for use at home it’s fine. Positioning it on the edge of a lake or a stream, I could push it in deep enough to get it down, to much the same level as I would have done on the small spike. Anywhere else at the moment during our drought, I might struggle to get it very far into the ground and miss having the smaller one, but then having it next to water at the moment is the most obvious place to put it and there’s nearly always soft mud that I can push it into. Largely because my last camera had stopped working and I haven’t got around to having it repaired, I haven’t had a camera out very much until I bought my latest trail camera ahead of my trip to Chad, the last trail camera videos of otters I captured, were in 2020. I was very relieved when I set the camera up after my Chad trip, to find that it had not been damaged at all during its encounters with Tinga’s baboons and works just as well as it did before my time at Tinga. The following video is a compilation of clips taken this year, initially I had the camera set up in the edge of a lake where I’ve obtained all my previous footage of otters, then more recently I moved it to beside a nearby stream, although it is only a very narrow and shallow stream, that’s not likely to have many fish in it, I wondered if the otters might use it as a highway all the same, so I was pleased to get confirmation of this, the final sequence is about a third of mile of away from where the first sequences of the swimming otter were taken.    

 

 

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  • 2 months later...
Botswanadreams

A sleeping Northern Sea Otter (Enhydra lutris kenyoni), East Pinta Rocks, Southeast Alaska

 

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P1230224.jpg.a608a782bcc72bbd391a90000a442eba.jpg

 

P1230233.jpg.c063fdf73fba7759e3a1da73e02f2f07.jpg

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