Jump to content

Show us your worldwide arachnids and insects.


Recommended Posts

  • Replies 87
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • Towlersonsafari

    15

  • graynomad

    14

  • Game Warden

    9

  • offshorebirder

    9

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

These snaps taken on the Oso Peninsula, Costa Rica last August as I was trying to get to grips with the dual frustrations of macro and flash photography for the first time. Taken using Canon 5D mkIII,

Ooo macro, one of my favourite pastimes. I'll start with some spiders. Huntsman spider, Devils Marbles reserve, NT Canon EOS 10D, 100macro, off-camera flash, 1/180s, f16 I think huntsmans are our

Like @TowlersonsafariI am enjoying the view through a macro lens and the challenge of identifying a myriad of different species. Last week I was able to watch a kill in the insect world as a labyrinth

Posted Images

Game Warden

Macro is amazing for highlighting the eye detail: fantastic shots and classic against a dark background Rob!

Link to post
Share on other sites
graynomad

Interesting spider Kittykat.

 

Yes Matt that's one reason I like macro, you get to see a lot of stuff you wouldn't otherwise see.

Link to post
Share on other sites
graynomad

That's one ugly critter there dikdik, most of my mates are better looking although some are almost as bad. I've not seen one of them yet, hopefully one day.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Those are fantastic shots! I've nothing even nearly as good to share, but I want to see some more good ones so thought I'd add a few of mine that are already uploaded on my blog (usually with some stories to go with them, whilch I'll link in case anyone wants more information...)

Pardaleodes_incerta_Amani.jpg

Butterflies are certainly insects, so should be permissable here - I'm sure others will have lots of lovely shots? This is Pardaleodes incerta in Amani NR, East Usambara (no common name I know of I'm afraid). And who can't go to tropical Africa and not see an African Monarch:

African_Monarch_Detail.jpg

 

This one is one of my favourites - Golden-banded Forester. Again from Amani NR this time, but common on the coast.

Banded_Forester.jpg

 

I've loads more butterflies too (these are all from a post on butterfly familes here), but let's move on. How about a proper arachnid from Mwiba ranch - a place my kids know as "The scorpion place" (Don't think that's on the marketing...):

Scorpion_Mwiba1.jpg

And though the picture has no artistic merit scorpion flourescence is just so cool!

 

Scorpion_UV.jpg

 

Back to insects, and these guys really scare me: hope none of you have had any nasty experience of them?

Paederus.jpg

 

Weaver ants are pretty interesting things too:

Oecophylla_longinoda.jpg

 

And millipede sex is just odd:

Mating_Millipede2.jpg

 

There must be others with nice dragonfly pictures around too? This is a Jaunty Dropwing.

Trithemis_stictica.jpg

Anyway, that will do for now! Hope to see more minibeasts soon

Link to post
Share on other sites
kittykat23uk

Interesting spider Kittykat.

 

Yes Matt that's one reason I like macro, you get to see a lot of stuff you wouldn't otherwise see.

Thanks, it's a screen grab off my video. Here's another weird Madagascar critter.

 

8175794986_24ca1d0454_c.jpg

PA276194 Rainbow Bush Locust by kittykat23uk, on Flickr

Link to post
Share on other sites
graynomad

@Kittykat

Those last bugs look like they have that insect-eating fungus.

 

@TZbirder
Nice shots and it's good to have some background as well. Your weaver ants looks and act exactly the same as our green tree ants.

27619.jpg
Green tree ants making a nest, Tyrconnell gold mine, near Dimbulah, QLD

Canon EOS 10D, 100macro, off-camera flash, 1/180s, f11

27622.jpg
Green tree ants making a nest, Tyrconnell gold mine, near Dimbulah, QLD

Canon EOS 10D, 100macro, off-camera flash, 1/180s, f16

27617.jpg
One green tree ant carrying another, Tyrconnell gold mine, near Dimbulah, QLD

Canon EOS 10D, 100macro, off-camera flash, 1/180s, f16

Any idea why it is carrying its mate? I doubt they are interested in helping an injured ant, maybe it's dead and becomes food for the nest.

27229.jpg
Green tree ants making nest, Tyrconnell gold mine, near Dimbulah, QLD

Canon EOS 10D, 100macro, off-camera flash, 1/90s, f16

29563.jpg
Green tree ant, Walsh Point, Port Warrender, Kimberley, WA

Canon EOS 10D, 100macro, off-camera flash, 1/60s, f16

Hard to get a sideways shot of them because they are really agro and arc up at anything, therefore they are normally facing the camera. Check the entrails.

Link to post
Share on other sites
graynomad

@TZbirder (again)

 

I just spent quite a lot of time reading your blog, really interesting stuff. Now I know why you are so worried about those Nairobi bugs.

 

I agree about the lunacy of introducing elephants to Oz, but man I'd love to have them here all the same :)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks! The similarities are because they are indeed very closely related, both Oecophylla ants. And your pictures where just the sort of set I was hoping to prompt! Kowing how fast they move, that's a truly amazing set...

Link to post
Share on other sites
kittykat23uk

@Kittykat

Those last bugs look like they have that insect-eating fungus.

 

.

Thanks, that is how they naturally look in their nymph stage. Then they transform inton these weird red things

 

8175754525_9db3834d4b_z.jpg

PA276313 Flatid leaf bugs by kittykat23uk, on Flickr

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 year later...

these photos are just fabulous!

Link to post
Share on other sites

post-45513-0-20408400-1392035897_thumb.jpg



Caterpillars! (Peru, amazon, August 2007)


Sorry I don't know what they are but I found them fascinating.


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 4 weeks later...
Treepol

Fruit chaffers, Tarangire NP, June 2008

 

P1000491.JPG?gl=AU

 

 

Neo-tropical Amazonian spider, Tambopata, Peru August 2013

 

P1030913.JPG?gl=AU

Link to post
Share on other sites
TonyQ

@@graynomad

The caterpillars were taken with the built-in pop up flash

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 9 months later...
Game Warden

Who has more insect and arachnid photos to upload?

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 months later...
Game Warden

Let's see some more close ups...

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 months later...
offshorebirder

Aye, aye @@Game Warden.

 

@@graynomad has set the bar exceedingly high with his outstanding images, but I will paddle along in his wake:

 

 

Scarlet-Bodied Wasp Moth (Cosmosoma myrodora) nectaring at African Blue Basil. This moth is a wasp mimic, which helps protect it against predators.

 

8004606172_74e8b9d07f_b.jpg

8004606204_a382c3306d_b.jpg

8004606140_28dcf7cc81_c.jpg

Cow Fly (one of the giant Tabanus species) at Santee National Wildlife Refuge in South Carolina. This huge relative of Horse Flies is not one you want to bite you!

 

9743716582_8b9b0ea2db_b.jpg

Four-spotted Pennant (Brachymesia gravida) - male

 

9437400900_f6580df483_b.jpg

Four-spotted Pennant (Brachymesia gravida) - female

 

9434423299_930e0f9211_b.jpg

Orange Holomelina. This moth species has the most unusual eyes of any moth I have ever encountered:

 

9405579976_4097e1bfae_b.jpg

Bee Fly (Xenon tigrinus) family Bombyliidae. A Carpenter Bee predator.

 

14432262575_c2046bc0de_c.jpg

Giant Leopard Moth (Hypercompe scribonia) in a Red Mulberry (Morus rubra) tree, its host plant.

 

13897869750_f50014b7f3_c.jpg

13897832590_521e54c320_c.jpg

Centipede species, Santee National Wildlife Refuge.

 

15185494697_aabdf432c2_b.jpg

Hentz's Orbweaver (Neoscona crucifera). This charming nocturnal spider comes out and spins a web each evening and then eats the web and retreats into a hiding place at dawn.

 

14430954382_5a929b1528_c.jpg

Carolina Wolf Spider (Hogna carolinensis) - largest wolf spider in North America.

 

14467632507_f0ba1377e1_z.jpg

Carolina Mantis (a young one / early instar):

 

14245659478_c6de88456a_c.jpg

Mournful Sphinx (Enyo lugubris) nectaring at Mexican Bush Sage just before sunrise.

 

8050437686_7289a40c33_c.jpg

Pink-spotted hawkmoths (Agrius cingulata)

These last images were taken at night a few years ago with a Canon point-and-shoot (A630) so the quality is not the best. But it gives an idea how long their proboscis is!

 

1414033542_e58dcfccf6.jpg

1414033538_d6f6e419ee.jpg

1414033526_c66b2e4f3c.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
offshorebirder

A friend at work just came and got me to show me this marvelous scarab beetle he saw in the wooded patch behind our building - it is a male Eastern Hercules Beetle (Dynastes tityus). It is huge! I used an iPhone to take the photo, so the image quality is not the best...

 

In doing some online research, I learned that well-fed individuals are a darker color than this one, and that adults feed on fruit (especially rotten fruit). So I took an aged banana out and smeared a little on the tree bark above the beetle so he could feed if he wanted to. I will keep an eye on it in case the banana attracts ants - but the beetle can fly, drop to the ground, etc. if it needs to, so I figured it was a good move to offer it some food.

 

18930514129_69c25f0eef_o.jpg

18928915360_163c6b4dff_o.jpg

Edited by offshorebirder
Link to post
Share on other sites
Tom Kellie

A friend at work just came and got me to show me this marvelous scarab beetle he saw in the wooded patch behind our building - it is a male Eastern Hercules Beetle (Dynastes tityus). It is huge! I used an iPhone to take the photo, so the image quality is not the best...

 

In doing some online research, I learned that well-fed individuals are a darker color than this one, and that adults feed on fruit (especially rotten fruit). So I took an aged banana out and smeared a little on the tree bark above the beetle so he could feed if he wanted to. I will keep an eye on it in case the banana attracts ants - but the beetle can fly, drop to the ground, etc. if it needs to, so I figured it was a good move to offer it some food.

 

~ @@offshorebirder

 

SUPER!

Both the beetle and the photos!

There are such large beetle species in North America?

Didn't know that but delighted to learn about them.

Thank you for posting the images and information.

Tom K.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Safaritalk uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. By using Safaritalk you agree to our use of cookies. If you wish to refuse the setting of cookies you can change settings on your browser to clear and block cookies. However, by doing so, Safaritalk may not work properly and you may not be able to access all areas. If you are happy to accept cookies and haven't adjusted browser settings to refuse cookies, Safaritalk will issue cookies when you log on to our site. Please also take a moment to read the Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy: Terms of Use l Privacy Policy