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Show us your Greater Kudu.


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Game Warden

Please include when and where taken, tech specs and any other pertinent details about the sighting.

 

(Note - there is already a topic for the Lesser Kudu which can be found here.)

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Safaridude

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Ugalla Game Reserve, Tanzania - Aug '07

 

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Kwando, Botswana - Aug '08

 

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Kafue National Park, Zambia - Sep '09

 

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Ruaha National Park - Sep '10

 

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Savuti (Chobe National Park), Botswana - Mar '11

 

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Loisaba, Kenya - Feb '12

 

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Kruger National Park, South Africa - May '13

 

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South Luangwa National Park, Zambia - Sep '13

 

 

 

 

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Soukous

Taken at Swartberg Wildlife Reserve, Klein Karoo, Western cape

 

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Safaridude

 

Yes. former member was with me in Savuti and Loisaba.

Edited by Tdgraves
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Soukous

Taken in Madikwe around 10am as we were returning to camp.

The light is horrible but the horns are magnificent.

 

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Soukous

Wow, awesome horns

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Safaridude

Probably the biggest one I have ever seen… Kings Pool, Botswana - Aug '97

 

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Kingfisher Safaris

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Apologies for the gruesome nature of this one but the demise of this large male was a real bonus for this pride.

Taken in the Chobe Enclave about 8kms from the Linyanti Gate of Chobe National Park along the floodplains of the marsh.

 

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After the Lions had had their fill, the skull ended up on the front of a Game Drive vehicle which was a bit of surprise for me (that's me on the left) when the guests arrived back in camp.

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  • 7 months later...
Bush dog

Taken in Samburu in July 2008

 

Technical information : Eos 1Ds Mark III - 285 mm - F/5,6 - 1/640 - ISO 800

 

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IamFisheye

A nice family shot from Kanga, Mana Pools last month

 

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  • 1 month later...
Dulini Moments

A recent shot with a few Oxpeckers as a bonus....

 

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  • 1 month later...
Game Warden

Who has more greater kudu photos to upload?

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michael-ibk

Okavango Delta, Kwara, 03/2014:

 

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Linyanti:

 

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  • 2 months later...
Tom Kellie

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~ Photographed in Samburu National Reserve, Kenya on 1 October, 2014 at 6:16 pm, with an EOS 1D X camera and an EF 400mm f/2.8L IS II super telephoto lens.

 

ISO 6400, 1/2000 sec., f/3.3, 400mm focal length, handheld Shutter Priority exposure.

 

One never knows, or, more to the point, I never know.

 

I'd thought that the day was done in Samburu as we rattled along the rocky track heading back to the Samburu Sopa Lodge. As we rounded a moderately-sized boulder a Tragelaphus strepiceros mother and calf were browsing on the other side.

 

Despite the low light, my finger repeatedly pressed the shutter button in the frazzled panic of one who fears the subject is about to run off.

 

I needn't to have fretted, as the pair had considerable sangfroid. Without having intended to be, we were so near that I wasn't able to photograph the entire animal, thus asked Anthony to reposition the safari van at slightly greater distance.

 

We observed them at a distance varying from 3 to 5 meters for about 7 minutes. Two other safari vehicles came upon the scene, slowed down, then went on their way.

 

I asked how it happened that the calf had faint markings on the throat and chest, as Tragelaphus imberbis would have. I learned that, as is shown in @@michael-ibk's “Okavango Delta, Kwara, 03/2014”, female Tragelaphus strepticeros often do have such markings, but notably less pronounced than in Tragelaphus imberbis. All other characteristics of both calf and mother were self-evidently those of Tragelaphus strepticeros.

 

Such a pleasing close to a day in Samburu, which schooled me on the fine points of kudu species differentiation. Both here in Safaritalk, and in the field, there is such a wealth of experience in those who are willing to correct misidentifications. The process of becoming familiar with East African species has had a steep learning curve, but what a wondrous classroom!

 

 

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Geoff

@@wenchy

 

The images look alright to me but what is more important is the incredible story they depict.

 

So what you are saying is that one animal was consumed whilst the other was left untouched and still with its horns entangled in the others carcass? Amazing!!

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  • 1 month later...
Tom Kellie

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Tragelaphus strepsiceros Browsing



Photographed at 6:17 pm on 1 October, 2014 in Samburu National Reserve, Kenya, using an EOS 1D X camera and an EF 400mm f/2.8L IS II super-telephoto lens.



ISO 6400, 1/2000 sec., f/3.2, 400mm focal length, handheld Manual exposure.



*******************************************************************************************************



Observing this Tragelaphus strepsiceros, Greater Kudu, browsing was one of the most moving experiences during any of the safaris I've been on.



She moved around the bush she was intently eating, passing thrillingly close to where I was standing in the safari van. All was silent save for the sound of her eating, and of my own heart pounding.


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  • 2 weeks later...
Tom Kellie

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Browsing at Lake Bogoria

Photographed at 9:40 am on 10 February, 2014 in Amboseli National Park, Kenya, using an EOS 1D X camera and an EF 400mm f/2.8L IS II super-telephoto lens.
ISO 800, 1/2000 sec., f/5.6, 400mm focal length, handheld Manual exposure.
*****************************************************************************************************
We'd driven on the rocky, rutted bypass at Lake Bogoria to see the geysers by the flooded lakeshore. Various birds and dik-dik were observed along the rough track.
Driving back to the entrance we encountered three female Greater Kudu browsing in lightly shaded bushes beside the track. Their graceful presence sent shivers in all of us.

 

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  • 9 months later...
Tom Kellie

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Female Greater Kudu in Sabi Sands



Photographed on 4 October, 2015 at 5:36 pm in Leopard Hills Private Game Reserve, Sabi Sands, South Africa with an EOS 1D X camera and an EF 200mm f/2.8L II telephoto lens.



ISO 125, 1/320 sec., f/2.8, 200mm focal length, handheld Manual exposure.



****************************************************************************************************



~ A pair of female Tragelaphus strepsiceros, Greater Kudu, came into view, seemingly materializing from nowhere. We'd thought that no game was around yet suddenly, there they were.



We parked to observe. This female sauntered by us, not a care in the world, going about her evening routine whilst I clumsily adjusted camera settings in the reduced light in order to capture her beauty.


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pomkiwi

Large male. Sabi Sands March 2015

 

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Nikon D7100, 70-300mm lens @230mm. ISO 100, f/6.3, 1/30 sec. Handheld. B+W conversion in Lightroom

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Ruaha Tanzania November 2015 Nikon D7100 Tamron 70-300mm

 

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  • 1 month later...
Antee

It´s all about the males when you think about the Greater Kudu. With their wonderful ornament horns.
And yes, they are like 100% more beautiful than the females but the later can also give you good photo opportunities.

Greater Kudu, Pilanesberg NP , South Africa

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PHALANX

All taken in Samburu Kenya, many years ago.Though the last two are later.

Sorry no Camera info as all are from my archives :)

 

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  • 4 months later...

August 2014 and November 2015: South Luangwa NP

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johnweir

The following images were taken in Ruaha N.P., in July 2016.

1. ZAMBEZI GREATER KUDU. (male). Strepsiceros zambiensis A beautiful specimen taken under difficult lighting conditions.

2. ZAMBEZI GREATER KUDU. (female).

I have included an image of a Lesser Kudu as I have met lots of African wildlife enthusiasts who have problems telling the two species apart, which is quite understandable.

Main differences appear to be, Greater Kudu: larger, possibly darker in colour, mane on neck and upper back, 4-9 body stripes. Lesser Kudu: smaller, lighter in colour, no mane, 7-14 body stripes and a white patch on both the upper and lower throat which is totally absent on the Greater.

3. SOUTHERN LESSER KUDU. (female). Ammelaphus australis

Taxonomy as used in 'Bovids of the World'. Jose R. Castello. Princeton Field Guides. 2016.

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post-50928-0-94983300-1478476802_thumb.jpgHello:

 

I was so excited to see Kudu in Zambia! Both in South Luangwa and Lower Zambezi. Here is a fun picture:

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