Jump to content

Atravelynn
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hi Lynn,

 

Interesting you saw these males.

 

Can you remember what date you saw the five males? I was 'over the border' in the Serengeti (at Kimondo) from 5th - 8th March. These guys had disappeared for a few days but returned for the last two. They are (or were) still hanging around the fringes of their maternal pride nearly always in the company of a young lioness, their sister. Did you see her with them? They were still having interactions with the pride lionesses but avoided the pride males (3 of them). My guide said they were around 4 years old.

 

The pride they have come from seemed very successful. It was difficult to count them all as I saw them together gathering only once but my guide said there were 25 including the five you saw plus the three pride males. In addition to these (almost) nomads there were a few three year old males, a handful of sub-adults (males and females) of about 18 months-two years, five cubs of around six months and one cub of two months (the sole survivor of a litter of three). I think there were four or five adult lionesses but as I say difficult to tell. All told there were 25 lions in the pride including the 5 males you saw plus the three pride males.

 

 

 

**Edit - I'm not sure it is the same five males!

Edited by Hammer_of_the_Gods
Link to comment
Share on other sites

@@Atravelynn

I have loved the cheetahs, theleopard and appearing cubs was amazing, the market fascinating and the monkey patch hilarious!

The coalition of 5 lions - wow. The shots of the wildlife around the waterhole without the lions are special enough - but the lions themselves are magnificent.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

But the Namiri romps were often viewed at a great distance because off-roading has been suspended

in the Namiri Plains area and only one road through the middle of the area can be used.

Excellent TR & images, Lynn.

 

Although with the suspension of off- roading in Namiri is very worrying for me. Apart from the less traffic, the opportunity to venture off-road (as in Ndutu) was the main reason for my booking.

 

If a compromise isn't reached soon, and I believe Asilia are meeting soon to discuss this issue, I'll be cancelling my 9 nights here and adding it back on to my already booked 11 nights @ Kwihala (giving me 20) come Nov.

 

Cheers

Marc

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ndutu’s official hours are 6-6. The extension a little bit beyond the 6 pm deadline usually occurred on the road to the camp.

 

 

I don't get it, you are the second one who states these times - both in 2014 and 2016 I've spent nine nights each in Ndutu and never ever did we return before 7 pm (and neither did any of the other cars we saw) - strange

The same applied to all my trips @ Ndutu, always back in camp after/around 7pm, and ALWAYS with the top closed. ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

@@Atravelynn, what a lovely group of young males, the last photo seems to show one with a longer, darker mane developing. Such handsome boys, hope they all continue to do well

Good observation. It would be fantastic to watch these boys mature and to see what kind of mega pride they might form, barring a splintering or split up.

 

Brilliant sighting at the waterhole.

It was. Moral of the story: Always check out the area. Glad we did.

 

A really good-looking bunch - a force to be reckoned with! The even more impressive showstoppers in this latest post are the pics of the running Wildebeest and later Zebras with White (and some Abdim) Storks flying over. Love those, such beautiful pictures!

I agree that the elements conspired nicely for the hoofed species in the water. Even the lions helped move them around and make them run.

 

Maybe you will see them next year when you do George 5.0

I hope you are prophetic. Hope there is a 5.0 or higher in your future as well and a 1.0 for some more vet students.

 

 

Hi Lynn,

 

Interesting you saw these males.

 

Can you remember what date you saw the five males? MARCH 6, late morning through late afternoon. Just one day. We tried to return to Hidden Valley again about 2 days later but heavy rains turned us around. When I talked with my Lithuanian buddy that I run into every year I have been to Ndutu, he said he had spent 10-12 days in Hidden Valley earlier than March 6 and there was no sign of male lions. If for some reason you click on my photos to get embedded info, it will show a different date for some of them, only because one of my camera's date settings was off by about 2 days. But it was March 6 that I saw the lions. I was 'over the border' in the Serengeti (at Kimondo) from 5th - 8th March. When I had read about them, they had been sighted in Serengeti rather than Ndutu. These guys had disappeared for a few days but returned for the last two. They are (or were) still hanging around the fringes of their maternal pride nearly always in the company of a young lioness, their sister. Did you see her with them? They were still having interactions with the pride lionesses but avoided the pride males (3 of them). My guide said they were around 4 years old. Now you know where they disappeared to. It's great to be able to assemble the story of these guys after the fact based on sightings. That's why this site is so much fun. I saw only the 5 males and no other pride members. 4 years old seemed right.

 

The pride they have come from seemed very successful. It was difficult to count them all as I saw them together gathering only once but my guide said there were 25 including the five you saw plus the three pride males. In addition to these (almost) nomads there were a few three year old males, a handful of sub-adults (males and females) of about 18 months-two years, five cubs of around six months and one cub of two months (the sole survivor of a litter of three). I think there were four or five adult lionesses but as I say difficult to tell. All told there were 25 lions in the pride including the 5 males you saw plus the three pride males. NIce sized pride you saw!

 

If the coalition had returned to Kimondo for the 7th and 8th, then we did not miss them when we had to turn back from Hidden Valley. You are making me feel better now. (But in missing the males, we caught wonderful cub interactions of the Big Marsh Pride. You really can't lose in the S. Serengeti/Ndutu region that time of year. If not this, then that.)

 

 

**Edit - I'm not sure it is the same five males!

 

Different topic @@Hammer_of_the_Gods. Could you please tell me/us about Kimondo? I am looking intently at that for a Feb time frame.

@@Atravelynn

I have loved the cheetahs, theleopard and appearing cubs was amazing, the market fascinating and the monkey patch hilarious!

The coalition of 5 lions - wow. The shots of the wildlife around the waterhole without the lions are special enough - but the lions themselves are magnificent.

Thanks Tony. They were a magnificent quintet. I found it interesting how bond-y they were with each other. It was darn hot yet 4 of them remained in bodily contact much of the time. Lots of head rubbing and literally touching gestures as they shifted around, trying to get comfortable with their huge, full bellies. How nice for me that 4 of them chose to remain within a frame. Pride dynamics at work.

 

 

But the Namiri romps were often viewed at a great distance because off-roading has been suspended

in the Namiri Plains area and only one road through the middle of the area can be used.

Excellent TR & images, Lynn.

 

Although with the suspension of off- roading in Namiri is very worrying for me. Apart from the less traffic, the opportunity to venture off-road (as in Ndutu) was the main reason for my booking.

 

If a compromise isn't reached soon, and I believe Asilia are meeting soon to discuss this issue, I'll be cancelling my 9 nights here and adding it back on to my already booked 11 nights @ Kwihala (giving me 20) come Nov.

 

Cheers

Marc

 

Certainly discussions are ongoing and my eval/survey for Asilia is supposedly one tiny part of them. And I think up to 3 more roads may be ongoing and underway too, so that it will not be off-roading if there is a road present to drive on. When all this settles down, I want to give Namiri Plains another try, should I be fortunate enough to return to that area. There is a lot going for this gorgeous section of the Serengeti. My visit may have coincided with the most stringent reaction to enforcement of the rules. So often in Africa when one thing falls apart, another comes on strong, balancing out. The coming on strong was the mother cheetah who was raising her 3 young cubs within view of the main road for the 3 days I was there. She had only arrived a week or so before. Don't know her whereabouts after I left.

 

20 nights in Tanzania--that's living the dream!

Edited by Atravelynn
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Ndutu’s official hours are 6-6. The extension a little bit beyond the 6 pm deadline usually occurred on the road to the camp.

 

 

I don't get it, you are the second one who states these times - both in 2014 and 2016 I've spent nine nights each in Ndutu and never ever did we return before 7 pm (and neither did any of the other cars we saw) - strange

The same applied to all my trips @ Ndutu, always back in camp after/around 7pm, and ALWAYS with the top closed. ;)

 

I have a friend who bought a little red sports car convertible as his mid-life crisis car--his term. His mid-life crisis motto is "Good times with the top down." It appears this motto should not be followed in Ndutu after 6 pm. We have you to thank for offering this cautionary warning. Thanks @@africaaddict.

 

In all other circumstances, though, may you have "good times with the top down!"

Edited by Atravelynn
Link to comment
Share on other sites

George nailed it on taking you down into the valley in Ndutu- the male lions are magnificent. Capturing 5 of them in a single shot is quite rare. Interesting behavior/ personality highlight in terms of the lone lion that did not stick with the other four. I wonder if lone male lions or even coalition of male lions is able to successfully hunt without females.

Edited by AKR1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

George nailed it on taking you down into the valley in Ndutu- the male lions are magnificent. Capturing 5 of them in a single shot is quite rare. Interesting behavior/ personality highlight in terms of the lone lion that did not stick with the other four. I wonder if lone male lions or even coalition of male lions is able to successfully hunt without females.

We saw a half-hearted attempt at running after some wildes that got too close. The 5 were very full when we arrived, but no sign of a carcass. It could have been the females that made the kill for these guys. What a job that would be to keep these 5 giants well fed!

 

This proves I saw them.

 

med_gallery_108_1525_531856.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

post-108-0-12435400-1461377905_thumb.jpg Sverker Sighting post-108-0-12435400-1461377905_thumb.jpg

In addition to the many wildlife highlights, there was a Safaritalk member sighting. Sverker and I connected on the “Who is Planning for 2016?” thread and hoped we could meet in Ndutu during our shared 48 hours in the region.

med_gallery_108_1525_183909.jpg

Sverker and Lynn in Plains of the Big Marsh. Compliments of @@Sverker.

I knew Sverker's party was traveling with Duma and that Duma vehicles were dark green. We visited Duma’s camp one evening in search of Sverker and friends but they had not yet arrived. So we left word with the manager on where we planned to be the next day, trying to increase our odds of meeting.

 

Next day mid-morning I saw a dark green vehicle in the distance and binos confirmed it was Duma. We approached and I stood up and called out, “Sverker?” Up he popped through the roof, immediately recognizable from his Safaritalk Avatar. We did it! We had met in Ndutu!

med_gallery_108_1525_106570.jpg

GTG in Plains of the Big Marsh. Compliments of Sverker.

We exited our vehicles and greeted each other and took some photos. Apparently Sverker’s party and I were quite the sensation because other vehicles came racing over toward us. Soon they were lined up and observing our mini GTG. How funny. I thought my zebra trousers, visible from across the horizon, may have played a role in attracting the other vehicles.

gallery_108_1525_141198.jpg

Our GTG and perhaps my trousers attracted a following. Vehicles zoomed in from across the plains . Compliments of Sverker.

Though brief, our meeting on Plains of the Big Marsh was enjoyable and I think our two guides got a kick out of it too. Afterward, we returned to our respective vehicles and headed off in different directions for different adventures. But we had succeeded in our mission to cross paths--and we have the photos to prove it!

med_gallery_108_1525_413660.jpg

George on left and Duma guide on right, part of the reunion too. Compliments of Sverker.

gallery_108_1525_211723.jpg

Close up of the zebra trousers to appreciate the fine details of this fabric that had been presented to me

two years ago by George as an anniversary gift. Compliments of Sverker.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I believe Sverker was on a birding trip as much as a traditional safari and he succeeded with a huge bird count.

 

In @@Sverker’s honor, here are:

gallery_108_1525_244877.jpg

White Storks between Namiri Plains and Seronera

gallery_108_1525_383390.jpg

Displaying Kori Bustard, Ndutu

post-108-0-12435400-1461377905_thumb.jpg Driving the Self Drivers near Makoa Plains, Ndutu post-108-0-12435400-1461377905_thumb.jpg

 

For a couple of nights at Njozi Ndutu was one of the managers of a company that helps market Njozi (along with other camps) and his friend. They had self-driven themselves to camp and we decided that the next day we’d explore caravan-style together so that George could lead them to interesting stuff.

 

We left at 6:00 am and about 20 minutes into our journey towards Makao Plains, George turned off the road for a better look at some distant lions. After bumping along about 3 minutes toward the lions, we realized the self-drivers were still on the main road. So we headed back to investigate.

 

The self-drivers told us they felt their vehicle (white truck with cab and storage bed that reminded me of what I saw in Namibia such as a Toyota Hilux or a Nissans with a single cab, but I am sorry I don’t know exactly what their truck was) might not be up to the terrain. Even more significant, they felt their driving skills may not be up to the terrain. Probably a prudent conclusion.

 

This incident reminded me of the importance of the skills of our guides who make zipping through aardvark den-laden terrain with ruts and mudholes seem like a routine jaunt down the street to the local Walgreen’s.

 

In my past Ndutu trips, I recall seeing a few self-drivers. This trip, I think most of them were South African and all seemed to be navigating just fine.

 

On an earlier trip there was a Dutch woman who we all knew about, including her various self-drive adventures. Stories travel fast throughout Ndutu. For example, she had gotten lost in Gol Kopjes, but managed to see a cheetah kill before she found her way out. I think there were a few instances of guided vehicles letting her follow them and offering directions, etc. Whenever she joined other vehicles at a sighting, she exuberantly but silently indicated her enthusiasm with whatever we all were looking at, elevating her to near celebrity status. Even George remembered her years later.

 

Anyway, the two self-drivers boarded our vehicle and off we went to the lions—one female and two males.

gallery_108_1525_549512.jpg

A mating pair. Near Makao Plains, Ndutu

The prospect of a mating pair seemed plausible but it did not happen until we revisited the lions again, later that day. Interestingly the female chose the blonder maned male, not the blacker maned male.

gallery_108_1525_398566.jpg

This encounter did not lead to mating. Near Makao Plains, Ndutu

gallery_108_1525_90857.jpg

gallery_108_1525_480995.jpg

We watched two sessions of mating over about an hour. Near Makao Plains, Ndutu

gallery_108_1525_1496509.jpg

The darker maned lion did not get the girl this time. He had to settle for the tree. Near Makao Plains, Ndutu - no other vehicles in am, one other in pm for 3 lions.

Fortunately our dinner conversation that night included some nice sightings from the self drivers’ day in the field. But they had not been confident enough with their driving skills to venture to the heart of Makao Plains where the young cheetah cubs were.

-----------------------

Did someone say cheetah cubs?

gallery_108_1523_854684.jpg

gallery_108_1523_993653.jpg

gallery_108_1523_278308.jpg

gallery_108_1523_739806.jpg

gallery_108_1523_2336678.jpg

gallery_108_1523_788546.jpg

med_gallery_108_1523_345622.jpgmed_gallery_108_1523_801489.jpg

med_gallery_108_1523_770233.jpgmed_gallery_108_1523_1051142.jpg

gallery_108_1523_127875.jpg

gallery_108_1523_951181.jpg

Makao Plains, Ndutu

Next installment is a breakfast and lunch locations and what we saw while dining in the bush

Edited by Atravelynn
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

post-108-0-65140800-1462146972_thumb.jpg Dining in the Bush – In the Vehicle and Viewed From the Vehicle post-108-0-65140800-1462146972_thumb.jpg

Other Vehicle #s noted

Breakfast and Lunch Boxes In the Vehicle

Though it is not mandatory when on safari with George to eat two meals a day from a box in the car, it is a strategy he embraces for maximizing the chances of seeing interesting animal behavior, with which I wholeheartedly agree. And I appreciate his willingness to be on the job 12+ hours a day.

 

Here are the locations and pictorial highlights of our 16 meals in the vehicle and 1breakfast in camp.

 

1) Breakfast: Namiri Plains and Barafu Kopjes on the horizon.

med_gallery_108_1522_1467333.jpg

Namiri Plains Barafu Kopjes

0 vehicles

 

2) Lunch: Seronera Valley.

gallery_108_1525_72908.jpg

gallery_108_1525_911603.jpg

Seronera, Serengeti. The lion rested under a bush for most of our lunch and then decided to get a drink as we were putting the lunch boxes away.

0 vehicles at the lion

3) Breakfast: Namiri Plains.

There were two lionesses walking at a distance of 350-400 meters (no photos) which hastened the cheetah family’s departure.

med_gallery_108_1522_1404861.jpgmed_gallery_108_1522_911155.jpg

No lion photos were possible (1-2 other vehicles), but this is some scenery right around breakfast time. Namiri Plains

4) Lunch: Seronera Valley.

A mother leopard and her cub in a tree were the subject of the "The Leopard Magic Show" in post #112, page 6.

med_gallery_108_1525_1859574.jpg

Seronera Valley, Serengeti.

Other vehicles ranged from 0 to probably 16, and everything in between during our couple of hours with the mother leopard and cub.

 

5) Breakfast:

This was our one exception to dining in the bush with a box. After a morning drive in the direction of Barafu Kopjes, we came back to Namiri Plains for breakfast in camp. I especially enjoyed the fresh squeezed juices. During that pre-breakfast morning drive, we watched the playful cheetah family with 3 tree-climbing cubs at a distance of 300 meters.

med_gallery_108_1522_1197090.jpg

Namiri Plains, distant cheetah cubs climbing trees

0 other vehicles. One arrived right after the cubs moved deeper into the woods.

 

6) Lunch: Naabi Hill Gate picnic site

Showing a rat at Naabi Hill by no means is an indication of a rat infestation at the picnic site. It was a treat to see several rats after looking carefully around the grounds for them.

gallery_108_1522_211241.jpg

Naabi Hill. I like this rat picture because it is eating grass, not discarded picnic food. There are signs asking visitors not to feed the birds and animals.

No one else was photographing rats while I was. Sightings were all private!

7) Breakfast: Ndutu, Makao Plains.

Breakfast and much of our first full day in Ndutu was spent with the mother cheetah and 2 cubs, most of the time at a distance of 20-40 meters.

gallery_108_1523_1049617.jpg

gallery_108_1523_707268.jpg

gallery_108_1523_64663.jpg

gallery_108_1523_162078.jpg

Makao Plains, Ndutu.

0 vehicles for 50% of the time. 1-3 other vehicles for 50% of the time.

On two occasions, the cubs tried to seek shade under our vehicle. While my impulse was to open the door, motion them in and let the cuddling begin, we discouraged them by waving the tse tse swatter and flapping my kanga purchased along with the post cards. The horn did not deter them from approaching and only gave them pause. Starting the engine was successful in redirecting them away from the vehicle.

 

We did see those two cubs seek refuge under neighboring vehicles and watched the mother stick her nose under the vehicle and chirp to encourage them to come out. The naughty cubs ignored their mother. That prompted me to ask George, “If there was sudden danger, like a lion, would the mother use a different chirp for more urgency?” The answer was yes.

 

We saw no cheetahs on vehicles or attempting to climb vehicles.

gallery_108_1523_1782512.jpggallery_108_1523_413223.jpg

gallery_108_1523_2020052.jpg

Makao Plains, Ndutu

0 vehicles for 50% of the time. 1-3 other vehicles for 50% of the time.

8) Lunch: Ndutu, Makao Plains Waterhole.

Herds generally came twice a day to drink—once between mid-morning and noonish and once in the afternoon. Sometimes the herds just remain near the waterhole for the entire day.

gallery_108_1525_337670.jpg

gallery_108_1525_448069.jpg

 

gallery_108_1525_866841.jpg

gallery_108_1525_458109.jpg

gallery_108_1525_318836.jpg

Makao Plains Waterhole in Ndutu.

0 other vehicles

9) Breakfast: Ndutu Small Marsh.

We were in search of a male leopard when we left camp at 6 am. We pulled up next to the leopard’s favorite tree overlooking Small Marsh. Within 5 minutes the leopard emerged from the tall grass of the marsh. Nights can get chilly but there is warmth trapped in the thick marsh vegetation, so that is where the leopard preferred spending his nights. During the day, the cool shade of the leaves and the breeze that goes with a slight elevation makes the tree branch more comfortable. And cats are all about their own comfort.

med_gallery_108_1525_299731.jpg

Leopard just emerged from the overnight warmth of Small Marsh. Taken with external flash after the OK by George.

3 other vehicles

 

Our breakfast was consumed after the leopard had his and then exited the tree. We waited for him to reappear. He never did.

gallery_108_1525_1626980.jpg

gallery_108_1525_429596.jpg

gallery_108_1525_1914728.jpg

gallery_108_1525_1583496.jpg

Leopard in tree at Small Marsh, Ndutu. External Flash used after the OK by George. There was zero reaction from the leopard to the flash.

2-3 other vehicles

As we waited for another appearance by the leopard (which did not happen), I am proud to declare I spotted a pair of crowned cranes and their chicks walking near the marsh. We drove over for a better look. It was my first photographable crowned crane chicks ever.

gallery_108_1525_1887028.jpg

gallery_108_1525_495797.jpg

Crowned cranes at Small Marsh, Ndutu

0 other vehicles until the cranes were obscured by tall grass, then 1 other vehicle came by to look.

Next: remaining 8 boxed meals & dining viewed from the vehicle.

Edited by Atravelynn
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here are the locations and pictorial highlights of our remaining 8 meals in the vehicle...

 

 

10) Lunch: Hidden Valley

Lunch and much of the day was spent with the coalition of 5 male lions.

gallery_108_1525_364396.jpg

gallery_108_1525_1183228.jpg

gallery_108_1525_1285576.jpg

gallery_108_1525_216057.jpg

gallery_108_1525_622923.jpg

Coalition of 5 males at Hidden Valley, Ndutu

 

gallery_108_1525_687533.jpg

gallery_108_1525_2245737.jpg

gallery_108_1525_1164990.jpg

gallery_108_1525_603844.jpg

Other activity going on around the 5 males, Hidden Valley, Ndutu

gallery_108_1525_720247.jpg

Overview of Hidden Valley, Ndutu

0 vehicles for 90% of the time, 1 other vehicle 10% of time (2 separate vehicles stayed a few minutes each) throughout our entire day in Hidden Valley with the 5 lions.

11) Breakfast: Makao Plains, Ndutu.

The mother cheetah with the 2 cubs found, stalked, and killed her prey in a span of 30 minutes. (Don’t hate me those of you who have spent a full day waiting for a cheetah to hunt and it doesn’t. Been there.) I was pleased that the other 2 vehicles (and ours) watched the hunt through binos at 300-ish meters and waited to approach until the cheetah had caught the Tommy.

gallery_108_1525_988485.jpg

gallery_108_1525_597399.jpg

gallery_108_1525_960577.jpg

gallery_108_1525_474401.jpg

Makao Plains, Ndutu

2 other vehicles watched the hunt

12) Lunch: Ndutu.

Two male lions were relaxing together. One of the males had no mane and aggressively walked straight toward the vehicle. There was a different look in his eyes that I have only seen a time or two before. We moved back and the lion did not pursue us. The self drivers that stayed at Njozi also mentioned this lion’s assertive demeanor and behavior when they encountered him later that same day.

med_gallery_108_1525_1155950.jpgmed_gallery_108_1525_1159347.jpg

Maneless male lion with assertive personality Maned buddy

Ndutu, not far from Makao Plains.

0 other vehicles

13) Breakfast: Ndutu.

The maned and maneless lions from the previous day were resting near their wilde kill, which summoned jackals into area.

 

The lounging lions were not very intriguing, but the jackals were fascinating, especially the overtly submissive behavior by one female. Perhaps she was out of her territory and being submissive to the resident jackal. Maybe she was courting this resident dominant male.

med_gallery_108_1525_433062.jpgmed_gallery_108_1525_1060041.jpgmed_gallery_108_1525_1906418.jpg

Jackals in Ndutu, not far from Makao Plains. Third photo shows submissiveness.

gallery_108_1525_197929.jpg

med_gallery_108_1525_1581790.jpgmed_gallery_108_1525_245206.jpg

gallery_108_1525_1074983.jpg

Jackals in Ndutu, not far from Makao Plains. Submissiveness is displayed.

1 or 2 other vehicles for a few minutes, now and then

14) Lunch: Ndutu, near Big Marsh Woodland.

The Big Marsh lion pride put on a show for us.

med_gallery_108_1524_1399498.jpgmed_gallery_108_1524_2098161.jpgmed_gallery_108_1524_1899268.jpg

gallery_108_1524_773009.jpg

gallery_108_1524_916984.jpg

gallery_108_1524_584212.jpg

gallery_108_1524_777543.jpg

gallery_108_1524_285307.jpg

Big Marsh Pride near Big Marsh Woodland

0 other vehicles

15) Breakfast: Matiti, Ndutu.

We scoured the plains for a mother cheetah and a year-old cub that had been seen in the area. We continued to survey the landscape during breakfast, but came up empty. As we left the area after breakfast we saw the posturing males who were sizing each other up. Maybe they had frightened off the mother and cub.

tn_gallery_108_1525_774096.jpg

Matiti, Ndutu. These unrelated males were sizing each other up. No fighting, they just walked off in separate directions.

0 other vehicles

 

16) Lunch: Ndutu Enduleni Valley, overlooking Makao Woodlands.

Wild dogs had been spotted in the Makao Woodlands, which drew us to the area. No dogs, but beautiful scenery.

gallery_108_1525_146177.jpg

Enduleni Valley, Ndutu

gallery_108_1525_102171.jpg

Ndutu, Looking up from Enduleni Valley

0 other vehicles

17) Breakfast: Makao Plains, Ndutu.

The last breakfast was spent in early morning mist with wildebeest herds and hyenas. Interestingly, it had taken until the second to last day of safari before the wildebeest sightings outnumbered the zebra sightings. This morning the wildebeest count soared, but no keeper photos to back that claim.

med_gallery_108_1525_984522.jpgmed_gallery_108_1525_202921.jpg

 

gallery_108_1525_92215.jpg

gallery_108_1525_2657.jpg

Matiti, Ndutu - Very pregnant hyena.

Next: dining viewed from the vehicle

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Some terrific shots, Lynn - I said it before but I´m really enchanted with the beauty of Hidden Valley, what a great place.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

@@Atravelynn your photos go from strength to strength and I especially love your photos of cats and birds.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

when we spotted the two male lions (one maneless) there was absolutely no aggressive behaviour at all, they were just lying around, not doing anything all

Edited by ice
Link to comment
Share on other sites

here are two pictures of a mother with a single, appr. one year old cub, not sure if they are the ones you missed out on

 

post-6901-0-73254900-1462286604_thumb.jpg

 

post-6901-0-77691700-1462286627_thumb.jpg

Edited by ice
Link to comment
Share on other sites

**Edit - I'm not sure it is the same five males!

Just caught that edit. That there could be TWO coalitions of 5 male lions in the Serengeti-Ndutu region is truly extraordinary and double the potential disruptiveness.

 

Some terrific shots, Lynn - I said it before but I´m really enchanted with the beauty of Hidden Valley, what a great place.

It certainly is a great place and not crowded because it is out of the way and more difficult to reach for shorter outings. Below are photos of Hidden Valley in Feb of 2014. I even chose this location to pose in, as you can see. Only one lion photographed in 2014 vs. five in 2016, but far more wildes in 2014. Hidden Valley was where we hung around about 5 hours waiting for a leopard to hunt in 2014. It did hunt and make a kill. I have no Hidden Valley photos of 2013 in mid-March because I don't think we made it there during my 5 nts in Ndutu, as we remained in the very active "Triangle Area" for most of our time on that trip. In contrast, in 2016 the only pass we made through the Triangle was on our way out of Ndutu at the end of the trip, and it was empty. Just goes to show that the localized rains completely dictate animal movements in Ndutu.

med_gallery_108_992_492724.jpgmed_gallery_108_992_743090.jpgmed_gallery_108_992_570025.jpg

Hidden Valley back in FEB OF 2014 --maybe this area deserves the title "Where the Big Cats Roam"

 

@@Atravelynn your photos go from strength to strength and I especially love your photos of cats and birds.

Thank you. There were few bird photos this trip because 3 cats in particular occupied most of my time. That was the mother cheetah and 2 cubs. I lucked out with lions too and the dining leopard was cooperative, leaving less time for bird watching.

 

when we spotted the two male lions (one maneless) there was absolutely no aggressive behaviour at all, they were just lying around, not doing anything all

I am really pleased to learn this because that may mean Mr. Maneless was just having a bad day when we observed him (along with the self drivers later). That would be preferable to a potential combative lion that could cause a problem. Thanks so much for the post script!

 

If you saw that cheetah mother and cub combo in the Matiti area, then those probably were the pair we had been searching for and missed. Do you recall the date/dates you observed them? As so often happens out in the bush, when you miss one thing another comes along. We missed that particular little family but saw the posturing male cheetahs; and we were fortunate to see a different mother and year old cub in Makao Plains.

 

Now I must ask you this about the mother and cub: were the photos taken from under a tree? <_<

 

I hope all the cheetah families we saw or did not see are enjoying the rains and eating well.

Edited by Atravelynn
Link to comment
Share on other sites

@@Atravelynn

 

Why do you assume these pictures were taken from under a tree? Sorry but I don't get it

 

As for the dates we saw those two: over my ten days stay we spotted at least 30 different individual cheetahs, most of them more than once. I have just finished my video diary and its corresponding narration script (40+ DIN A4 pages). Based on these 40+ pages I might start something like a trip summary (certainly not a comprehensive trip report, though) and this trip summary could very well include an Excel Sheet of when we saw which cheetahs and what they were doing.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

@Atrevelynn

 

Once again, your TR reads more like a guidebook. Thank you!

 

And I love those orange pants.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

what Lynn says is absolutely true: at one cheetah kill (in the open plains) I counted 22 different cars - 5 (!) minutes later 18 of these 22 cars had raced off again..most guides don't look for animals, they look for parked cars, that's why we sometimes hid under trees

 

 

@@Atravelynn

 

Why do you assume these pictures were taken from under a tree? Sorry but I don't get it - I was referring to what you stated above. I thought that strategy of hiding under the tree was quite clever and cheeky. I don't really think you took all your photos from under a tree.

 

As for the dates we saw those two: over my ten days stay we spotted at least 30 different individual cheetahs, most of them more than once. I have just finished my video diary and its corresponding narration script (40+ DIN A4 pages). Based on these 40+ pages I might start something like a trip summary (certainly not a comprehensive trip report, though) and this trip summary could very well include an Excel Sheet of when we saw which cheetahs and what they were doing. An Excel sheet of cheetah sightings would make me purr!

 

 

@Atrevelynn

 

Once again, your TR reads more like a guidebook. Thank you!

 

And I love those orange pants.

Thank you @@Safaridude. If I ever did make an actual guidebook, I'd put those pants on the cover!

Edited by Atravelynn
Link to comment
Share on other sites

@@Atravelynn

 

Got you! The thing is, the night before we saw those particular cheetahs it had rained (something my guide and I had been silently praying for). With our light Landcruiser it was still possible to cross over to the plains whereas a lot of bigger and heavier Landrovers didn't dare coming or got stuck. The first four or five hours we had the plains completely to ourselves and that's when we saw those cheetahs. Hiding under trees was obviously only an option in the woodlands.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

@@Atravelynn

 

Got you! The thing is, the night before we saw those particular cheetahs it had rained (something my guide and I had been silently praying for). With our light Landcruiser it was still possible to cross over to the plains whereas a lot of bigger and heavier Landrovers didn't dare coming or got stuck. The first four or five hours we had the plains completely to ourselves and that's when we saw those cheetahs. Hiding under trees was obviously only an option in the woodlands.

Very interesting point on the vehicles. Weather, cheetahs, and vehicle weight all came together for you!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

@@Atravelynn

 

Got you! The thing is, the night before we saw those particular cheetahs it had rained (something my guide and I had been silently praying for). With our light Landcruiser it was still possible to cross over to the plains whereas a lot of bigger and heavier Landrovers didn't dare coming or got stuck. The first four or five hours we had the plains completely to ourselves and that's when we saw those cheetahs. Hiding under trees was obviously only an option in the woodlands.

Very interesting point on the vehicles. Weather, cheetahs, and vehicle weight all came together for you!

 

 

especially since they made a kill in front of our eyes and we were the only humans to witness it

Link to comment
Share on other sites

@@Atravelynn

 

Got you! The thing is, the night before we saw those particular cheetahs it had rained (something my guide and I had been silently praying for). With our light Landcruiser it was still possible to cross over to the plains whereas a lot of bigger and heavier Landrovers didn't dare coming or got stuck. The first four or five hours we had the plains completely to ourselves and that's when we saw those cheetahs. Hiding under trees was obviously only an option in the woodlands.

 

Landcruisers are heavier (nearly a third) and less manoeuvrable in rough terrain than Land Rovers. I had this conversation with the Asilia guides at Kimondo and Namiri recently. the guide at Namiri was usually based out of Unbuntu.

 

Kimondo and Ubuntu still use Land Rovers for this very reason - they are based in the south and north for part of the year and the Land Rovers performance in the mud and rain was superior due to the lower weight. While I was at Kimondo in March we rescued two Landcruisers after heavy rain.

 

That being said the Ubuntu guide at Namiri preferred the Landcruiser to drive.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

maybe I confused those types of vehicles, maybe we were driving a Landrover and the others Landcruisers

Link to comment
Share on other sites

maybe I confused those types of vehicles, maybe we were driving a Landrover and the others Landcruisers

That would make sense to me. I thought the Rovers looked lighter/smaller than Cruisers. But my knowledge of vehicles is limited to not much more than "where is the door to get in."

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Safaritalk uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. By using Safaritalk you agree to our use of cookies. If you wish to refuse the setting of cookies you can change settings on your browser to clear and block cookies. However, by doing so, Safaritalk may not work properly and you may not be able to access all areas. If you are happy to accept cookies and haven't adjusted browser settings to refuse cookies, Safaritalk will issue cookies when you log on to our site. Please also take a moment to read the Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy: Terms of Use l Privacy Policy