Jump to content

Recommended Posts

We are back from another successful Red Panda Expedition!
These cutest and one of the rarest animals on the planet didn't disappoint us at all. Inspite of terrible weather in the hills all over Nepal, we had brilliant sightings of 2 individuals in just 3 days time.
There have been early spells of rain all over the mountains here this season. The windy dirt roads full of slush and boulders was not an easy one to drive on. But kudos to the whole team for making it possible in such difficult conditions. The red pandas live in some of the most difficult but also one of the most beautiful landscapes in the Himalayas. The moss ladened jungles of the Himalayas are so rich in bio-diversity. We were extremely happy to see that the communities living around these wilderness have started to understand the importance of these creature and their habitat. Tourism has certainly played a big role in the same. The area also has sightings of a lot of rare high altitude birds like the moral, satyr tragopan, blood pheasant etc. We hope you will enjoy the picture here... We will post more soon!
 

Red Panda 2 small.jpg

Red Panda 1.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Lovely! Any plans to find a clouded leopard  next time? :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Lovely! Any plans to find a clouded leopard  next time? :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oh yes! The red pandas definitely share their rich natural home with several other rare creatures and clouded leopard is definitely one of them. Soon as we get to access the jungles better after monsoon, we will do a couple of camera trap studies there to discover more of the shy inhabitants. In the mean time we are busy refurbishing a homestay which we will also inaugurate post monsoon. This will serve as a base for us as well. 

Fingers crossed :) !!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Lovely photos of a beautiful animal- well done!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi... Thank you so much for your lovely comment. You can also click some amazing pictures of this beautiful creature by joining out trip. Be a part of it and get a wonderful chance to see elusive  Red Panda and it's habitat and very important the people who are working day and night to protect them. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There are not many left in the hill of north eastern India and Nepal. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 months later...

excellent photos. I would love to see one in the wild. Hopefully the local communities are seeing a value for protecting the red panda and its home.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...

Wow, such a creature.  But it is the title of your report that really caught my attention. ANOTHER successful red panda expedition.  To see even one, just once would be amazing.  That's like saying I just found another cinnamon bun that looks exactly like Mother Theresa!

 

The one little guy looked equally enthused to see you.

 

May you have many more red panda visits!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Atravelynn said:

Wow, such a creature.  But it is the title of your report that really caught my attention. ANOTHER successful red panda expedition.  To see even one, just once would be amazing.  That's like saying I just found another cinnamon bun that looks exactly like Mother Theresa!

 

The one little guy looked equally enthused to see you.

 

May you have many more red panda visits!

 

If you know where to look for them I believe that they are quite reliable @Atravelynn especially in Sichuan at the right time of year. In Nepal my impression is that you need to work harder to see them and as has been noted above the nature of the clour forest means that seeing them can be tricky in the mist and low cloud.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 hours ago, kittykat23uk said:

 

If you know where to look for them I believe that they are quite reliable @Atravelynn especially in Sichuan at the right time of year. In Nepal my impression is that you need to work harder to see them and as has been noted above the nature of the clour forest means that seeing them can be tricky in the mist and low cloud.

Then the Mother Theresa cinnamon bun analogy may not be correct.  Good to know they are not as elusive as I thought!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Safaritalk uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. By using Safaritalk you agree to our use of cookies. If you wish to refuse the setting of cookies you can change settings on your browser to clear and block cookies. However, by doing so, Safaritalk may not work properly and you may not be able to access all areas. If you are happy to accept cookies and haven't adjusted browser settings to refuse cookies, Safaritalk will issue cookies when you log on to our site. Please also take a moment to read the Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy: Terms of Use l Privacy Policy