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Third bridge camp wild dog lost his pack and reunites after two days. Moremi NP, Botswana


JPS
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This year we have once again been praised for the wildlife moments we have experienced.

We were able to enjoy a wild dog that lost its pack and spent 2 days calling in and around our camp, after two days they found each other again around/in our camp.

 

I hope you can enjoy this movie.

 

 

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As far as I know, you are not allowed to drive around Third Bridge at night, except to go to the ablution block. How come you broke this rule? To make your cheesy video and trumped up fake story? Meh…..

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Wildship

Maybe he is in camp.

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7 hours ago, KaliCA said:

As far as I know, you are not allowed to drive around Third Bridge at night, except to go to the ablution block. How come you broke this rule? To make your cheesy video and trumped up fake story? Meh…..

What warm words, says a lot about your personality?

 

We kept to the gate times by the way and we came back to the camp where it all happened, by the way, we were watching with the camp administrators. 

Don't judge too quickly, just ask is your lesson learned for today.

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5 hours ago, Wildship said:

Maybe he is in camp.

Spot on!

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wilddog

That 'hooing' of the wilddog is unmistakable. Such a haunting sound. 

 

I too have seen this happen in Mana, when an elaphant scattered the pack at a waterhole at the end of the morning. I spent the whole afrernoon listening to the calls, and worrying, as they tried to reunite.  When we went out waking, the calls continued until finally we saw them reunited as full pack. 

Edited by wilddog
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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, wilddog said:

That 'hooing' of the wilddog is unmistakable. Such a haunting sound. 

 

I too have seen this happen in Mana, when an elaphant scattered the pack at a waterhole at the end of the morning. I spent the whole afrernoon listening to the calls, and worrying, as they tried to reunite.  When we went out walking, the calls continued until finally we saw them reunited as full pack. 

So you can enjoy watching with good memories from the past! It is a special moment when you can see them reunite.....

Edited by wilddog
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Alex The Lion

Whilst I wouldn't put it in the same terms as @KaliCA there are other rules that have been broken.

 

1. You shouldn't be using your headlights and flash lamp on wild dogs at night, especially for such a prolonged period.

 

2. Whilst you may have been "in camp", you are actually in breach of the Film Guidelines for Moremi. Under Rule 4.9.6, it states the following:

 

"If permission has been granted to film after dark, such filming should be accomplished with NO LIGHTS by resorting to use of technologies like image intensifiers and infra-red lighting."

 

 

 

 

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Posted (edited)
23 hours ago, Alex The Lion said:

Whilst I wouldn't put it in the same terms as @KaliCA there are other rules that have been broken.

 

1. You shouldn't be using your headlights and flash lamp on wild dogs at night, especially for such a prolonged period.

 

2. Whilst you may have been "in camp", you are actually in breach of the Film Guidelines for Moremi. Under Rule 4.9.6, it states the following:

 

"If permission has been granted to film after dark, such filming should be accomplished with NO LIGHTS by resorting to use of technologies like image intensifiers and infra-red lighting."

 

 

 

 

Hi Alex,

 

At least you have a decent way of communicating which is appreciated, some feedback from myself below..

 

1. You shouldn't be using your headlights and flashlamp on wild dogs at night, especially for such a prolonged period.

 

So I have been on many safari trips and lights is what we use in the night especially when we see wildlife in the camp, also note that predators don't bother with flashlights, it is the grass eaters you should be carefully with?

 

2. Whilst you may have been "in camp", you are actually in breach of the Film Guidelines for Moremi. Under Rule 4.9.6, it states the following:

 

"If permission has been granted to film after dark, such filming should be accomplished with NO LIGHTS by resorting to use of technologies like image intensifiers and infra-red lighting."

 

Again as said before the camp keepers and rangers across the bridge as you can see in the film are there as well, so it is up to them to explain to me the rules that stated in 5.12.6 :)?

What I do like is that you are concerned about the wildlife which is good and believe me, we are as well and we are very carefully and respect all rules as not feeding the animals putting drink water etc etc, but I think that you have little experiences if I hear your comments?

 

 

Edited by JPS
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Alex The Lion
1 hour ago, JPS said:

Hi Alex,

 

At least you have a decent way of communicating which is appreciated, some feedback from myself below..

 

1. You shouldn't be using your headlights and flashlamp on wild dogs at night, especially for such a prolonged period.

 

So I have been on many safari trips and lights is what we use in the night especially when we see wildlife in the camp, also note that predators don't bother with flashlights, it is the grass eaters you should be carefully with?

 

2. Whilst you may have been "in camp", you are actually in breach of the Film Guidelines for Moremi. Under Rule 4.9.6, it states the following:

 

"If permission has been granted to film after dark, such filming should be accomplished with NO LIGHTS by resorting to use of technologies like image intensifiers and infra-red lighting."

 

Again as said before the camp keepers and rangers across the bridge as you can see in the film are there as well, so it is up to them to explain to me the rules that stated in 5.12.6 :)?

What I do like is that you are concerned about the wildlife which is good and believe me, we are as well and we are very carefully and respect all rules as not feeding the animals putting drink water etc etc, but I think that you have little experiences if I hear your comments?

 

 

 

I would suggest that you do some in depth reading on how the bright white lights of your vehicle dazzle all animals, particularly a diurnal predators like a Wild dog/cheetahs.  In similar situations, guides will turn off their headlights and drive with an infrared spotlight only, which you are not doing.

 

The "camp keepers" are Xomae employees, not people there to enforce the rules. Whether you are told or not, you are aware that you should not be out filming at that time or conducting a game drive at night. This is clearly stipulated, you don't carefully "respect all the rules".

 

My concern are the small "Youtube stories" you are creating which potentially encourages more self-drivers to act in a similar manner, not to mention potentially monetising the situation. I do know that you try to actively promote your videos across different social media platforms.

 

As for "my perceived lack of experience" in these matters, I do find the ad hominem approach rather humorous. You are right though, Alex the Lion has very little experience, he didn't previously work in a lodge in Moremi. Oh, he also doesn't currently hold an Official Filming Permit for Moremi Game reserve or understand the long process to get permissions for night filming. He is just a geek who used google to look up the filming rules after going on safari once, to write a comment on an internet forum!

 

We have all bent the rules, whether it be leaving or returning to camp early. However, in this situation, you are potentially making the dogs susceptible to other predators. Even in the private concessions where it is easy to follow the dogs, following them stops after dusk.

 

Edited by Alex The Lion
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18 minutes ago, Alex The Lion said:

 

I would suggest that you do some in depth reading on how the bright white lights of your vehicle dazzle all animals, particularly a diurnal predators like a Wild dog/cheetahs.  In similar situations, guides will turn off their headlights and drive with an infrared spotlight only, which you are not doing.

 

The "camp keepers" are Xomae employees, not people there to enforce the rules. Whether you are told or not, you are aware that you should not be out filming at that time or conducting a game drive at night. This is clearly stipulated, you don't carefully "respect all the rules".

 

My concern are the small "Youtube stories" you are creating which potentially encourages more self-drivers to act in a similar manner, not to mention potentially monetising the situation. I do know that you try to actively promote your videos across different social media platforms.

 

As for "my perceived lack of experience" in these matters, I do find the ad hominem approach rather humorous. You are right though, Alex the Lion has very little experience, he didn't previously work in a lodge in Moremi. Oh, he also doesn't currently hold an Official Filming Permit for Moremi Game reserve or understand the long process to get permissions for night filming. He is just a geek who used google to look up the filming rules after going on safari once, to write a comment on an internet forum!

 

We have all bent the rules, whether it be leaving or returning to camp early. However, in this situation, you are potentially making the dogs susceptible to other predators. Even in the private concessions where it is easy to follow the dogs, following them stops after dusk.

 

 

 

Sorry Alex do not agree,  and during lots of my travels guides keep the lights on and do not use infra-red, with elephants and other animals they do take care.

Yes, that were indeed xomae employees being picked up by rangers and they walked over the bridge (as it was broken) in this period.

 

You having a night permit and worked in a lodge before does not make you MR know everything, judging other people who respect the rules of nature.

 

And I do not actively promote my videos, I am sharing my stories for years now with other fellow travelers who enjoy these kinds of films. (if you don't like....don't look)

Based on my published movies, you can see that I am traveling as a tourist for many years enjoying nature 2-3 times per year over all Africa, so I am not a super specialist well-educated ranger as you pretend to be, but I have seen and done a lot and in different countries.

 

And If I see a massive pack running towards my camp while I am driving back...sorry I am a bit full of energy and enthusiasms to enjoy that sighting and I do need my lights to drive in the bush, if you think that any tourist will stop their cars and switch off their torches and stop breathing......wake up bro even the xomae team was torching and looking what was happening.

 

Next time you can scare everybody away asking if they have the same night permit as you have so that you with your special permit and your infra-red special lights can make your movie.........

 

I don't like to communicate this way, but Alex as said wake up.

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Alex The Lion

@JPS I am not really sure how to respond to your posts. Though what is clear is your hubris and a clear mis-belief that you respect the 'Rules of Nature'. You have tried belittling raised concerns through first claiming I have no experience, to then labeling me a know it all. I have noticed that having posted the same video on another self drive forum, the first response was to raise similar concerns about the excessive use of lights.

 

Ignoring the personal insults, lets be realistic, you have attempted to push a sighting to create your little video and went too far.

 

The spotlight does not even have a red filter on it and is being used a poor manner. I noticed on another forum you posted the following "Please note that the wild dogs were not bothered by the extent to which I can judge that, and as far as I know, predators are not bothered by lights"

 

Are you aware that that studies have shown that if a bright white light is shone on a cat for 60 seconds, it takes up to 35 minutes for their night vision to recover? As a result of such studies, camps operated by Chiawa safaris in the Lower Zambezi and Luangwa do not allow guest to use a flash during night photography and only red filters are used. I haven't seen a White spot light used in Botswana for a long time. Best practice is constantly changing, which is why only skilled professionals should really be using a spotlight, as they will receive refresher courses as things change. I guess that makes me a kill-joy!

 

Irrespective of any "energy and enthusiasm", once dusk has gone, you should have left the wild dogs to it. Respecting the "rules of nature" also means that we have to sometimes give up sightings when it is getting interesting.

 

The person who "needs to wake up bro" is you, as the way you are behaving is not within the rules or ethical. There is a reason why National Parks have strict rules about night drives and times, and this is a good example why.

 

Edited by Alex The Lion
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3 hours ago, Alex The Lion said:

@JPS I am not really sure how to respond to your posts. Though what is clear is your hubris and a clear mis-belief that you respect the 'Rules of Nature'. You have tried belittling raised concerns through first claiming I have no experience, to then labeling me a know it all. I have noticed that having posted the same video on another self drive forum, the first response was to raise similar concerns about the excessive use of lights.

 

Ignoring the personal insults, lets be realistic, you have attempted to push a sighting to create your little video and went too far.

 

The spotlight does not even have a red filter on it and is being used a poor manner. I noticed on another forum you posted the following "Please note that the wild dogs were not bothered by the extent to which I can judge that, and as far as I know, predators are not bothered by lights"

 

Are you aware that that studies have shown that if a bright white light is shone on a cat for 60 seconds, it takes up to 35 minutes for their night vision to recover? As a result of such studies, camps operated by Chiawa safaris in the Lower Zambezi and Luangwa do not allow guest to use a flash during night photography and only red filters are used. I haven't seen a White spot light used in Botswana for a long time. Best practice is constantly changing, which is why only skilled professionals should really be using a spotlight, as they will receive refresher courses as things change. I guess that makes me a kill-joy!

 

Irrespective of any "energy and enthusiasm", once dusk has gone, you should have left the wild dogs to it. Respecting the "rules of nature" also means that we have to sometimes give up sightings when it is getting interesting.

 

The person who "needs to wake up bro" is you, as the way you are behaving is not within the rules or ethical. There is a reason why National Parks have strict rules about night drives and times, and this is a good example why.

 

Alex, I think we have reached a point that we both don't agree with each other and for me, it does not make any sense to proceed with this discussion.

 

The positive thing what I get from you is that you are concerned about the wildlife, which is a good thing, and therefore I would like to wish you a very good weekend.

 

Cheers

 

Johan

 

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I'm with JPS on this - I have been travelling to Africa for 20+ years, with now 50+ safaris in seven different countries and God knows how many parks on my back and never ever have I heard about park or camp officials prohibiting the use of flash lights; quite the opposite: in Kruger Park for example, one of the biggest parks in Africa which operates dozens of sunset and night drives every day, they specifically encourage you to use your flash light. Kruger Park is also the park where on sunset and night drives up to three different "regular" spotlights are handed out to tourists (aka "non professionals"). Tourists who bring their own "regular" lights are free to use them.

 

Alas, 95% of the "professional" guides I was travelling with use regular "white" spotlights, to shine both on predators and herbivores (obviously trying to avoid the eyes). In fact, the only place I remember where red light is used is at the waterhole at Olifantsrus in Etosha (there may naturally be others, of course).

 

If you look at this video (which I filmed many many years ago, so excuse the inferior quality) you will notice that none of the cats seem to be bothered at all. They don't even close their eyes, which they imho would instinctively do where they annoyed.

 

 

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another, slightly younger one, also filmed in Kruger - you will notice that more than one white spotlight is used, you will see the flashes of cameras and you can also hear the guide talking

 

 

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1 hour ago, ice said:

another, slightly younger one, also filmed in Kruger - you will notice that more than one white spotlight is used, you will see the flashes of cameras and you can also hear the guide talking

 

 

Thanks for sharing these movies which are not spotted every day :).

Also appreciating sharing your real life experiences.

 

Have a good weekend

 

Johan

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image.jpeg.64a08a52dcdc4cda8a5eaa03a9c8a0ac.jpeg

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A night drive in the Khwai Community Concession in 2018: a leopard with a cub had just made a kill which was then stolen by a hyena. The appearance of the hyena sent the leopards up in two different trees. For good measure minutes later a lone wild dog showed up - and tons of cars: self drivers, mobile campers with guides and tourists staying at lodges with their respective guides. At least a dozen different lights were directed at the cats and dogs, spotlights, flashlights, some even used the front lights of their safari vehicles.

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50 minutes ago, ice said:

A night drive in the Khwai Community Concession in 2018: a leopard with a cub had just made a kill which was then stolen by a hyena. The appearance of the hyena sent the leopards up in two different trees. For good measure minutes later a lone wild dog showed up - and tons of cars: self drivers, mobile campers with guides and tourists staying at lodges with their respective guides. At least a dozen different lights were directed at the cats and dogs, spotlights, flashlights, some even used the front lights of their safari vehicles.

Can you add the correct link? If I press https://www.youtube.com/c/OliverNorwellHardy I end up at;

 

image.png.1f8eac40ff268f9fc0d5c5e423f59a32.png

On 6/14/2022 at 7:06 PM, Alex The Lion said:

 

 

 

 

 

 

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53 minutes ago, JPS said:

Can you add the correct link? If I press https://www.youtube.com/c/OliverNorwellHardy I end up at

 

 

I thought you could start those videos right here from this page, at least that's what I can do

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https://youtu.be/_sxDwxRMWAs

 

is that better? (not sure why it shows up black, though?

 

 

Edited by ice
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No....end up at the wrath hog kill again ;-)

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Ah now i see it in your previous answer....I think it takes some time??

 

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Alex The Lion

@jps and @ice

 

I don't really understand the point you are attempting to make through sharing these videos? There are plenty of examples of poor practice on the internet? Is there any research to support your assertion?

 

Just because it happened historically, and continues to happen, does not mean it is correct. As i have mentioned, best practice changes continuously, as research reveals the impact of artificial lighting on the natural world.

 

The correct use of spotlights is hard to enforce, and as "consumers" we are to blame. We are all aware that tipping plays a significant part of an African safari, and that sadly influences decisions that are taken.

 

For lots of guides, guiding is a job, not a true vocation. So when a client asks them to take off the red filter, or just shine the light over here for my photo etc, many will do so. They know it will influence the size of their tip. There is also an element of self-preservation, as I not sure those Kruger drives would be popular if a small light with red filter was just used. This would then cost people their livelyhood.

 

Lets take @ice example in Khwai. You have two leopards up a tree. It takes a guide with a strong character to turn to his guests, explain his company's view is on the use of spotlights and leave that sighting, when other operators are behaving differently. It would appear that is currently the private concession, more high end camps that are able to implement this successfully.

 

It is comparable to the issue in East Africa of cheetah jumping on vehicles, just because it has previously occurred, doesn't make it right. We all know that in most circumstances, guides are likely to enjoy a large tip if their client gets this close interaction, which to them outweighs the ethics and risks in allowing it to happen.

 

For what it is worth, I have not taken an image at night with a flash/spotlight for more than 15 years.

Edited by Alex The Lion
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16 hours ago, Alex The Lion said:

Are you aware that that studies have shown that if a bright white light is shone on a cat for 60 seconds, it takes up to 35 minutes for their night vision to recover?

 

I am sorry but is that what you call research???? Who researched where, what and how long? And most importantly, how did the "researchers" "measure" (what a joke!)? Did they put electrical sensors behind the cat's eyes????? If not, it's just utter speculation.

 

Seems to me like you have never been in a National Park run by the South African government. The sunset and night drives there are conducted by guides employed by SanParks. They are by no means depending on tips, in most cases they don't even get any. Now if SANParks was aware of your super significant research results it would be the easiest thing for them to just (literally) pull the plugs on the spotlights in their vehicles. As it stands, though they conduct roughly 15.000 sunset and night drives per year in Kruger Park alone - and guess what, the cats are still there and striving.

 

Just look at the videos I posted: none of the cats "freezes" when a spotlight hits them, none run away...hell, they don't even close their eyes. I guess your researchers should tell them about their "results", maybe they would then act accordingly. 

 

By the way, if you comment to (my) contributions, you should read more carefully: I told you that in my 20+ years of travelling to Africa I have not once come across a guide who had a red filter for his spotlight, not once. So in the end I assume you stay sat in your ivory tower while JPS and I enjoy your game drives with spotlights and flashes. 

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