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A safari for flowers and insects!  End of May though start of June is high season for Dwarf Lake Iris; Mid-July through August is high season for Hine’s Emerald Dragonflies at The Ridges Sanctuary in Bailey's Harbor, Door County, in the state of Wisconsin.

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Dwarf Lake Iris in The Ridges Sanctuary, 24 May

 

 

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Dwarf Lake Iris in The Ridges Sanctuary, 31 May

 

 

Warning: Porphyrophobiacs may find the photographic contents of this report to be disturbing.

 

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Dwarf Lake Iris in The Ridges Sanctuary, 31 May

 

 

On the other hand, for purpleologists like me, the blankets of tiny purple irises covering the ground was what initially motivated me to visit The Ridges.

 

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Dwarf Lake Iris in The Ridges Sanctuary, 31 May

 

 

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Dwarf Lake Iris and Gaywings, 31 May

 

 

The Dwarf Lake Iris and Hine's Emerald Dragonfly make their homes in The Ridges Sanctuary in Bailey’s Harbor, Door County, Wisconsin.  The next 3 maps show the location.

 

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The tiny Dwarf Lake Irises grow to a height of only an inch or two off the ground.  My boot is for size comparison.

 

 

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Hine’s Emerald Dragonfly at rest in The Ridges Sanctuary, something these dragonflies very rarely do.

 

 

Dwarf Lake Irises are a Great Lakes endemic.  They are endangered in the state of Wisconsin, due to shrinking habitat that results from such things as shoreline development, road construction, chemical spraying, winter salting, and destruction from off-road vehicles. Mid-May to early June is bloom time for these irises, usually peaking the last weekend in May.

 

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Dwarf Lake Iris and Gaywings, 1 June

 

 

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Dwarf Lake Iris, 24 May

 

 

The only endangered dragonfly species in the USA, the Hine’s Emerald, lives in the states of Wisconsin, Illinois, Michigan, and Missouri, plus Ontario, Canada. The largest population of Hine’s Emeralds is found in Door County, Wisconsin.  Mid-July through August is peak time to see these little drones darting about, after they emerge from their first homes, which are crayfish burrows.  From egg to larva takes approximately 4-5 years, a long time for dragonfly maturation, which may contribute to the species’ scarcity.

 

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Emerald Hines Dragonfly in flight.  They rarely perch.

 

 

The Ridges Sanctuary in Bailey’s Harbor of Door County in Wisconsin gets its name from the ridges formed by waves pounding the shoreline of Lake Michigan, which has constantly been shifting over the past 1400 years.  As the waves reach the shore they build up ridges of piled sand, then as the lake recedes over time, a new outline of ridges is formed. 

 

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If Lake Michigan recedes, these ridges made of sand can remain behind

 

 

In between the ridges are swales, on which tall grass or woodlands have grown.  The swales vary in width from several feet to (I’d estimate) 50 feet or more.  In all, the 1500-acre sanctuary contains around 30 ridges. 

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Grassy swale between ridges, occupied by a white-tailed deer.

 

 

Boardwalks, bridges and designated trails preserve the fragile sandy habitat of ridges and swales that are prone to erosion.  Trails are very well marked and circular, so you can’t get lost—at least not for long.

 

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Dwarf Lake Iris and Gaywings, 31 May

 

 

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12-spotted Skimmer Dragonfly

 

 

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Hairy Woodpecker

 

 

Fees for The Ridges are $5/per person/day or you can buy a $45 individual annual pass.  There is also a guided walk for $8 (I think $5 for members) Mon-Sat at 10 am for about 2 hours from around mid-May to mid-Oct.  Very worthwhile--from explanations on the terrain and history of the sanctuary to pointing out flora and fauna on the walks.

 

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Note the Yellow Wood Violet, mixed in with the irises, 1 June

 

 

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Dwarf Lake Iris and Gaywings, 1 June

 

 

I did one guided walk during each of my three 2-night visits to The Ridges. But both the Dwarf Lake Iris (around the end of May) and the Hine’s Emerald Dragonfly (mid-July to August especially when it is sunny) are easily seen in the sanctuary if you spend even 30 minutes, so you don’t need a guide to point them out.

 

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The Ridges Nature Center and the start of the boardwalk that winds through part of the sanctuary

 

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Dragonfly bench on boardwalk near the nature center building

 

 

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Dwarf Lake Iris, Gaywings, other vegetation, 1 June

 

 

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Dwarf Lake Iris and Gaywings, 31 May

 

 

For all of my visits I stayed at The Ridges Inn & Suites in Bailey’s Harbor https://ridgesinn.com/  just 1/3 of a mile (1 minute by car) from The Ridges Sanctuary.  It’s possible to walk between the two, but the route is along a highway so I never walked and always drove. The manager told me a path away from the highway was in the works to connect the two spots.  That would be nice.

 

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Trilliums and Wood Violets, 1 June

 

 

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White-tailed Deer, 28 July at 6 am

 

 

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Dwarf Lake Iris and Gaywings, 1 June

 

 

Dwarf Lake Iris, 2022

I avoided the busy and high-priced Memorial Day Weekend (May 28, 29, 30 in 2022), when the irises are typically at their peak, so therefore I visited

 

Sunday 22 May, 2 pm arrival

Monday 23 May

depart Tuesday 24 May at 1 pm

 

and then again

 

Tuesday 31 May, 3 pm arrival

Wednesday 1 June

depart Thursday 2 June at 8 am

 

 

Even very early in the tourism season, such as May and the first week of June, hotel vacancies on weekends can be limited, so I chose mostly weeknights.

 

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Dwarf Lake Iris, one of the largest patches found on the earlier of two visits, 22 May

 

 

Our Wisconsin 2022 spring had been late, meaning all flowers including the Dwarf Lake Irises were slightly behind schedule.  My later May 31 to June 2 trip had more abundant irises than the earlier May 22 to May 24 trip, as the photos show.  All iris photos are labeled with dates. 

 

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Dwarf Lake Iris, 22 May

 

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Dwarf Lake Iris, 24 May

 

 

Marsh Marigolds, an early flower, were in greater abundance on the first of my two spring visits.

 

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Marsh Marigolds, 22 May

 

 

 

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Marsh Marigolds, 22 May

 

 

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One of the ponds in The Ridges Sanctuary, 22 May

 

 

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Dwarf Lake Iris, 23 May

Fauna complemented the flora in late May.

 

 

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Green Heron in one of the ponds of The Ridges Sanctuary

 

 

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Painted Turtle in pond

 

 

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Baby porcupine, a highlight of my first visit, 24 May

 

 

 

A 2-minute drive from The Ridges Sanctuary Nature Center (visitor center) or a 3-minute drive from The Ridges Inn & Suites is a public beach with parking.  The beach is also accessible from the sanctuary trails on foot.

 

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Early dawn shot at 4:55 am on 24 May when sunrise was 5:26 am.  Taken at public beach.

 

To be continued

Edited by Atravelynn
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~ @Atravelynn:

 

The above information with images shows why it pays to regularly stop by Safaritalk.

 

The context, natural beauty, and clear sense of purpose are inspiring.

 

Thank you so much for taking time to prepare and post this.

 

What other trip report would feature a cute baby porcupine?

 

Really wonderful!

 

         Tom K.

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On 12/9/2022 at 10:26 PM, Tom Kellie said:

~ @Atravelynn:

 

 

 

 

What other trip report would feature a cute baby porcupine?

 

Really wonderful!

 

         Tom K.

Thank you. I'd love to do a porcupine safari and I already have the title--A Prickle of Porcupines.  My sightings of this species have been rare, so I was thrilled to see this little guy.

 

The carpets of Dwarf Lake Iris were more prolific on the second of my two spring visits (31 May to 2 June).

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Carpet of Dwarf Lake Iris, 31 May

 

 

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Carpet of Dwarf Lake Iris, 1 June

 

 

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Carpet of Dwarf Lake Iris, 1 June

 

 

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Dwarf Lake Iris and Gaywings, 31 May

 

Pantone, the world-renowned authority on color and provider of color systems, announced that the Color of the Year for 2023 will be Viva Magenta, “brave and fearless, a pulsating color whose exuberance promotes a joyous and optimistic celebration, writing a new narrative.”  Those were my exact thoughts when I laid eyes upon the Gaywings in all their magenta splendor.

 

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Gaywings, 31 May

 

 

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Gaywings, 31 May

 

 

The 2022 Pantone Color of the Year favored the Dwarf Lake Iris—Very Peri, “a striking shade of periwinkle, fusing fidelity and constancy with energy.”

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Dwarf Lake Iris in a Very Peri mood,  31 May

 

 

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A tidy Dwarf Iris bouquet, somewhere between periwinkle and amethyst.

 

 So, The Ridges appears to be the epitome of trending color fashion.  Who knew? And I was in the midst of it.  I believe that makes me hip!

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Dwarf Iris and Gaywings, 31 May

 

 

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Dwarf Iris and Gaywings, 1 June

 

To be continued

Edited by Atravelynn
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What an excellent subject for a Safari. And here was I thinking that Wisconsin was all Beer and Oshkosh.

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With Porphyrophobiacs  and now Oshkosh I'm learning new things whilst following this enjoyable report.

 

Can't help thinking of " Mackerel Sky - Never long wet never long dry." with that early dawn shot.

 

As well as the young porcupine and the young deer I find the Painted Turtle quite appealing. Are they quite common ?

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1 hour ago, Caracal said:

With Porphyrophobiacs  and now Oshkosh I'm learning new things whilst following this enjoyable report.  Always happy to educate!  Thanks.

 

Can't help thinking of " Mackerel Sky - Never long wet never long dry." with that early dawn shot.  What a good observation.

 

As well as the young porcupine and the young deer I find the Painted Turtle quite appealing. Are they quite common ?  The white-tailed deer are very common, though not in cities.  The population is between 1.5 and 2 million in Wisconsin.  Human population of the state is just under 6 million.  Vehicle-deer collisions number about 16,000 per year.  Painted turtles can often be seen in ponds so those are not rare.  But porcupines are very hard to find.

 

4 hours ago, Galana said:

What an excellent subject for a Safari. And here was I thinking that Wisconsin was all Beer and Oshkosh.

On my next visit to the Ridges I'll have to wear Oshkosh b'gosh overalls and for refreshment crack open a brewski.   Now that would be really hip.

 

 

 

Other wildflowers and wildlife rounded out the second spring visit to The Ridges.

 

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Beanbuck or Bogbean, 31 May

 

 

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Aquatic Forget-Me-Nots, 1 June

 

 

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Aquatic Forget-Me-Nots, 1 June

 

 

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Trillium, typically one of the first Spring flowers to appear, 2 June

 

 

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Commonly seen Blue Jay, 31 May

 

 

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Great White Egret

 

 

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Pelicans on Lake Michigan viewed from The Ridges Sanctuary

 

 

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Pelican on Lake Michigan

 

 

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Bonaparte Gull over Lake Michigan, viewed from The Ridges Sanctuary

 

 

A red squirrel must have gotten too close to a robin’s nest, sending the robin into an uncharacteristic aggressive frenzy.

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American Robin acting aggressively toward a Red Squirrel

 

 

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American Robin and Red Squirrel

 

 

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Red Squirrel

 

 

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The downed birch tree in the background is typical of the forest landscape because the sandy soil does not support the shallow birch roots.

 

 

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Slug on Dwarf Lake Iris, a hazard to this plant.  I did not remove the slug.

 

When the iconic floral species of the region combines with a charismatic and lengthy reptile, magic ensues!  The mid-morning sun enticed this Common Garter Snake to bask in its warmth amid the Dwarf Lake Iris in what I consider a photographic coup!

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Common Garter Snake and Dwarf Lake Iris, 1 June

 

 

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Common Garter Snake and Dwarf Lake Iris, 1 June

 

 

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Common Garter Snake and Dwarf Lake Iris, 1 June

 

 

The Common Garter Snake posed briefly, tongue extended, then slithered to safety.  What a great encounter!

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Common Garter Snake, 1 June

 

 

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Common Garter Snake, 1 June

 

 

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Common Garter Snake, 1 June

  To be continued

Edited by Atravelynn
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~ @Atravelynn:

 

It would be remiss to fail to thank you for the Common Garter Snake series.

 

A superb capture which brings out the beauty of the species.

 

Your safari at the Ridges is my kind of wildlife adventure, with all due respect given to creatures great and small.

 

Much appreciation for your attentive pleasure in the great outdoors, as so generously shared with us.

 

          Tom K.

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~ @Atravelynn:

 

When returning to the United States after decades overseas, the final leg was from Doha, Qatar to Chicago.

 

On 25 January, 2021 I was in a window seat on the right side of the aircraft.

 

In early afternoon on a snowy day the flight path heading toward O'Hare took the aircraft directly past Door County.

 

Sturgeon Bay was unmistakably visible from aloft despite the falling snow far below.

 

At the time one would've never imagined that a lovely safari about that area would appear in Safaritalk.

 

         Tom K.

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22 hours ago, Tom Kellie said:

~ @Atravelynn:

 

Your safari at the Ridges is my kind of wildlife adventure, with all due respect given to creatures great and small.

 

Thanks and with it being a relatively short distance from home (3.25 hours for me) and far less expensive than an African Safari (by thou$sand$) it is even one more reason to be my kind of wildlife adventure too.

 

 

22 hours ago, Tom Kellie said:

~ @Atravelynn:

 

When returning to the United States after decades overseas, the final leg was from Doha, Qatar to Chicago.

 

On 25 January, 2021 I was in a window seat on the right side of the aircraft.

 

In early afternoon on a snowy day the flight path heading toward O'Hare took the aircraft directly past Door County.

 

Sturgeon Bay was unmistakably visible from aloft despite the falling snow far below.

 

At the time one would've never imagined that a lovely safari about that area would appear in Safaritalk. 

 

Wow! Thanks so much for sharing that memory of very significant flight and time in your life.  A quick stop in Sturgeon Bay, about 25 miles south of The Ridges in Bailey's Harbor, will complete this trip report in the next installment.  Thank you for the lead-in!  If you looked real hard out of that plane window  maybe you even saw the spider webs that I photographed and that will appear at the end of the report. (ha ha)   Probably not in January through the snow. 

 

Edited by Atravelynn
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A floral safari! it looks beautiful and very relaxing! thanks for sharing. 

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It just gets better. Blue Jays and Garter snakes. b'gosh.

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22 hours ago, Kitsafari said:

A floral safari! it looks beautiful and very relaxing! thanks for sharing.  Very relaxing and no tses tses like we encountered in Zambia.

 

16 hours ago, Galana said:

It just gets better. Blue Jays and Garter snakes. b'gosh.  Now you're catching onto the local lingo!

 

 

You are more prescient than you know @Tom Kelliewith your comment,

"due respect given to creatures great and small."  Today I participated in a local Forest Bathing outing, which originated in Japan as shinrin-yoku.  Appreciating and respecting creatures and vegetation great and small was a focus.  No actual bathing occurred in this cold weather, but we “soaked in” the forest atmosphere.

 

 

 

Hine’s Emerald Dragonfly, 2022

The heart of the summer is the most popular time to visit Door County and coincides with prime Hine's Emerald Dragonfly time. My husband and I avoided the weekends and visited

 

Tuesday 26 July, 2 pm arrival

Wednesday 27 July

Depart Thursday 28 July at 10:30 am

 

Unlike the irises that stay put, the Hine’s Emerald Dragonflies zip about, making photography a challenge.  Other species of dragonflies perch more often and for longer periods of time, but the Hine's Emeralds rarely pause or even hover.

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Blue Dasher at rest, 27 July

 

 

 

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Juvenile White-faced Meadowhawk at rest, 27 July

 

 

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Widow Skimmer at rest, 27 July

 

 

On the July 27th 10 am guided hike, our naturalist explained that the Hine’s Emeralds can be distinguished from the other many dragonfly species in the area by their slightly protruding abdomen and their brilliant green eyes--to which my husband remarked, “Just like me.”  An accurate statement that became the Quote of the Trip.  In fact it is the Quote of all 3 Trips to The Ridges.

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Hines Emerald Dragonfly in flight at pond, 27 July

 

 

If just seeing the endangered Hine’s Emerald Dragonfly was a goal rather than photographing it, the likelihood of success would be nearly 100% in mid-July and into August because they are flying everywhere, and their eyes green eyes that reflect in the sun help give them away.

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Hine's Emerald Dragonfly at rest, a rare event, 28 July

 

I asked our hike leader and other knowledgeable regular visitors at the sanctuary about the best strategies to try to photograph the Hine's Emeralds.  The suggestions I received included:  choose mornings, go when the sun is bright, sit on a bench and try to shoot them flying at you because they are curious, try the nearby beach, go to the grassy swales, focus on aquatic areas.

 

For photos, I found mornings to be better than afternoons and the only Hines Emerald I saw in my entire three days that perched was in the morning.  And it was next to a pond, the best area for Hine’s Emerald photography in my opinion. 

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Hine’s Emerald Dragonfly alighting near a pond. Very uncommon to find, 28 July

 

 

For the flying Hine’s Emeralds, I pointed the camera downward at the pond’s dark water and lily pads and just clicked away at high shutter speed when a Hine’s Emerald entered the view finder.  The results for these dragonflies in flight (DIFs) were poor to ok.

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Variegated Pond-Lily in bloom.  The blossom does not open up further.

 

 

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Hines Emerald Dragonfly in flight at pond, 28 July—an ok shot

 

 

 

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Canada Darner I believe

 

 

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Common White Tail, female, 27 July

 

 

 

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Four Spotted Skimmer, 26 July

 

 

 

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Mating Spotted Skimmers, 26 July

 

 

 

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Dot-tailed Whiteface, 26 July

 

 

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Laying eggs

 

 

 

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Eggs laid

 

 

 

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Cabbage Butterfly and Death Camus Lily

 

 

 

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Great White Egret flying over Lake Michigan, viewed from The Ridges

 

 

 

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4 Great White Egrets in Lake Michigan, viewed from The Ridges

 

 

At 6:00 am on July 28 the Hine’s Emeralds were flying all over the place above my head.  They were too fast and it was too dark to take their pictures but a doe and fawn were more obliging.

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Nursing white-tailed fawn, 28 July at 6 am

 

September 30 I was in the area and made a brief 2-hour visit to The Ridges Sanctuary.  No Hine’s Emeralds or Dwarf Lake Irises at that time.  But there were some cooperative painted turtles that were enjoying the 2 pm sun and it is always a lovely spot to visit.

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The Ridges, September 30

 

 

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Painted Turtles at The Ridges, September 30, 2 pm

 

 

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Painted Turtle, The Ridges, September 30, 2pm

 

 

 

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Painted Turtle, The Ridges, September 30, 2pm

 

 

 

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Great Blue Heron, September 30

 

 

 

About half an hour south of The Ridges is Crossroads at Big Creek in Sturgeon Bay.  It is a 200-acre nature preserve, with no admission fee although donations are appreciated, which I visited on Oct 1 from 6:45 am to 8:30 am and walked several of the marked trails.  The Ridges and Crossroads at Big Creek make a good combination for a nature outing.

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Crossroads at Big Creek, morning of Oct 1

 

 

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Crossroads at Big Creek, morning of Oct 1, spider in the web

 

 

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Crossroads at Big Creek, morning of Oct 1

 

 

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Crossroads at Big Creek, morning of Oct 1, spider in the web on left

 

 

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Crossroads at Big Creek, morning of Oct 1

 

 

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White-tailed Deer at Crossroads at Big Creek, morning of Oct 1

 

 

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White-tailed Deer at Crossroads at Big Creek, morning of Oct 1

 

There are about 25 orchid species that grow in The Ridges during the spring and summer months, 25 reasons to visit in the future.

 

The End

Edited by Atravelynn
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A White-tailed end to a most enjoyable TR.  

 

I hadn't realised that your Blue Jay was such a stunning colour.

Thanks for including more Painted Turtle photos - I've become a fan!

 

 

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15 minutes ago, Caracal said:

A White-tailed end to a most enjoyable TR.  

 

I hadn't realised that your Blue Jay was such a stunning colour.

Thanks for including more Painted Turtle photos - I've become a fan!

 

 

Thanks! Blue Jays are one bird I think looks better from the back to show more color. 

Edited by Atravelynn
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I just found this about Hine's Emeralds.

 

https://news.wttw.com/2012/01/26/photographing-endangered-species

 

Excerpts from the article, Photographing Endangered Species, from WTTW, Chicago's Public Broadcasting Station, dated January 26, 2012:

 

Wildlife photographer Carol Freeman is on a quest to capture the images of Illinois’ most endangered species. It’s called the Endangered Species Photography Project and was started in 2004. Since then, Freeman has made it her life’s work to track down and photograph all of the state’s wildlife that is in danger of extinction.

 

Ask her which photograph she’s most proud of?

That’s easy: the Hine’s Emerald Dragonfly.

“I would go every other week during its flight season. It took three years,” said Freeman. “I finally found it; it flew right out in front of me. I couldn’t believe it. I’m like, oh, my god, oh, my god, oh, my god.”

 

 

I added the green to the text.

 

Edited by Atravelynn
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oooh i do like thaat turtle sunbathing with its back legs all stretched out. The white tailed deeer in the mist looking back is a lovely atmospheric shot

 

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3 hours ago, Atravelynn said:

ou are more prescient than you know @Tom Kelliewith your comment,

"due respect given to creatures great and small."  Today I participated in a local Forest Bathing outing, which originated in Japan as shinrin-yoku.  Appreciating and respecting creatures and vegetation great and small was a focus.  No actual bathing occurred in this cold weather, but we “soaked in” the forest atmosphere.

 

~ @Atravelynn:

 

Thank you so much for this remarkable final post.

 

Your Door County trip report attains the ideal of full respect for nature's intrinsic wonder.

 

From the late 1980s through much of the 1990s I served in Japan as a life sciences (field ecology) instructor.

 

During that period 森林浴, i.e. shinrin-yoku, was an integral component of students’ extended field experience.

 

Not really naturalist training, nor any sort of would-be New Age curative therapy, 森林浴 was more the process of becoming centered within the living world.

 

Calmly listening, watching, inhaling, sensing — all the while relaxing into nature's rhythms — it recalibrated harried urban sensibilities.

 

When preparing and posting trip reports there were occasions when private messages brought inquiries as to why wildflowers and dragonflies were featured alongside larger species.

 

While there's no definitive answer for that, the respect and joy of your wondrous trip report reflects similar values.

 

Going back over the posts in this trip report there was a surge of feeling due to recognition of the marvels of nature on a smaller scale.

 

Acceptance of any given local biosphere is a step towards acceptance of the cosmos itself and one's part in it, however fragile and minute.

 

You've given both pleasure and insight in this special trip report. What a highlight of 2022 in Safaritalk!

 

         Tom K.

 

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7 hours ago, Atravelynn said:

Now you're catching onto the local lingo!

More like remembering it. I still have my EAA Baseball Cap somewhere but my visit way back then was mainly fixed wings and my wildlife experiences focused more on Black Bears, Beavers and Chipmunks. (and Yellow-bellied Sapsuckers)  I still have the scar from a large Canadian Mossie bite too. Years before ST or the interwebbie thing. I was still using 35mm slides. Got run out of town by the Sheriff of Warren Dunes.. What a tale for ST that would have made.

I doubt I will ever get back so I am very grateful for you showing me what I missed all those years ago..

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17 hours ago, Kitsafari said:

oooh i do like thaat turtle sunbathing with its back legs all stretched out.  I am taking lessons for the next time I lounge in the sun.

 

 

17 hours ago, Tom Kellie said:

 

~ @Atravelynn:

 

 

 

From the late 1980s through much of the 1990s I served in Japan as a life sciences (field ecology) instructor.

 

During that period 森林浴, i.e. shinrin-yoku, was an integral component of students’ extended field experience.

 

Not really naturalist training, nor any sort of would-be New Age curative therapy, 森林浴 was more the process of becoming centered within the living world.

 

Calmly listening, watching, inhaling, sensing — all the while relaxing into nature's rhythms — it recalibrated harried urban sensibilities.

 

 

You have captured the essence of Shinrin-yoku as well as its Japanese spelling!!  I really enjoyed my Forest Bathing outing and I hope to incorporate those concepts in future nature outings, near and far!

 

 

 

12 hours ago, Galana said:

  I still have the scar from a large Canadian Mossie bite too.  They grow 'em big up there.

I doubt I will ever get back so I am very grateful for you showing me what I missed all those years ago..If you ever do return, please let me know!

 

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Towlersonsafari

I really enjoyed the dragonfly photo's- and the name of the dot tailed white face-and any snake sighting is always splendid, but surely the best way to photo the Hines is for your husband to run around flapping his arms madly in a giant Hines impression, attracting all the rival males @Atravelynn

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2 hours ago, Towlersonsafari said:

 surely the best way to photo the Hines is for your husband to run around flapping his arms madly in a giant Hines impression, attracting all the rival males @Atravelynn

Why didn't I think of that!!??  It will take me until July to talk him into that for next year.  I'll tell him he has the Towers to thank for this suggestion!

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  • 1 month later...
michael-ibk

What a beautiful place, Lynn, thank you for showing us. Love the Baby Porcupine, the Squirrel-Robin standoff and the Snake. And Doug would commend you for all those Dragonflies. ;)

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What a wonderful way to start my morning ... with all those lovely photos.

Thank you so much for sharing them.

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Atravelynn
On 1/22/2023 at 12:44 PM, michael-ibk said:

What a beautiful place, Lynn, thank you for showing us. Love the Baby Porcupine, the Squirrel-Robin standoff and the Snake. And Doug would commend you for all those Dragonflies. image.png.d391b6ffa80b522dcef3badb5b8ecc4c.png I did miss Doug's cookery skills on this trip.  Had to fend for myself with the microwave when not dining out.

 

On 1/22/2023 at 1:46 PM, Ginny said:

What a wonderful way to start my morning ... with all those lovely photos.

Thank you so much for sharing them.  You are welcome.  Seeing your location, perhaps you could visit this place some day.

 

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