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Paul T

Show us your snakes and crocs etc...

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sanjay

Love these reptiles.. Wonderful images all around..

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Morkel Erasmus

Nice pics!!

 

A young Croc on the banks of the Chobe river...landscape style...

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Morkel Erasmus

This one was photographed in the Olifants river in Kruger, looking down from one of the bridges that cross this wide river.

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Soukous

That's close enough

 

Chobe 2014

 

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Tom Kellie

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Crocodylus niloticus by the Mara River

 

Photographed in Masai Mara National Reserve, Kenya, on 7 February, 2014 at 3:00 pm, using an EOS 1D X camera and an EF 400mm f/2.8L IS II super telephoto lens.

ISO 100, 1/1600 sec., f/2.8, 400mm focal length, handheld Manual exposure.

We'd been observing numerous hippos resting out of the Mara River flow on sandy shoals when this Crocodylus niloticus was spotted.

The detail of its features shown in this image reflects my own fascination with its form.

The cryptic coloration to enable it to rest undetected near the water surface is both tough and decorative.

The claws and teeth are in such fine condition — that may mean more to me who lacks such a well-maintained structure.

Despite being aware of their fearsome power, there's something likable about Nile crocodiles, who've survived from ages past with a form well-suited for their ecological niche.

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Geoff

The welcoming committee.... South Luangwa, upstream from Kaingo camp, Sept' 2008.

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Tom Kellie

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We guarantee that there'll be an unforgettable ‘welcome to South Luangwa’ banquet.


Who's the guest of honor? Why it's none other than YOU, of course!


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Tom Kellie

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~ Hi, @@Morkel Erasmus!

 

I really enjoyed seeing this image.

Thanks for explaining how you made it...from a bridge.

Very nice!

Tom K.

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Tom Kellie

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~ @@Morkel Erasmus:

 

And then I saw this...

WOW!

It's what I really love — landscape with animal.

What talent and taste you have. Lucky those guided by you.

Tom K.

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KaingU Lodge

This evening on the river

 

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Peter Connan

Great shot!

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Tom Kellie

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~ @@KaingU Lodge:

 

When this SUPERB image appeared on my computer screen, I involuntarily yelped!

It's everything that I most love in a nature image.

Color, compostion, focus — you take me there to the river to see one of my favorite species.

Many, many hearty thanks for posting this great photo in Safaritalk for all of us to enjoy.

Tom K.

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Morkel Erasmus

@@Tom Kellie thanks so much for your kind words! :D

Glad you enjoyed the images...

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Tom Kellie

@@Tom Kellie thanks so much for your kind words! :D

Glad you enjoyed the images...

 

~ @ Morkel Erasmus:

 

The consistently high standard of your nature images sets a high bar.

I really appreciate your regularly sharing such fine photos on Safaritalk.

Tom K.

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Tom Kellie

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Python natalensis by the Mbagathi River, Kenya



Photographed beside the Mbagathi River, Kenya, near the Emakoko walking bridge, on 5 May, 2015 at 11:04 am, with an EOS 1D Mark IV camera and a Zeiss Makro-Planar T* 100mm f/2 ZE lens.



ISO 200, 1/5000 sec., 100mm focal length, handheld Manual exposure.



After 8 safaris in Kenya during four years, I'd given up any hope of ever photographing a snake in the wild.



While saying as his guest at the Emakoko, I mentioned this over dinner to Emakoko manager Anthony Childs, who is an experienced snake expert.



As I was putting my bag in the vehicle to be driven to Jomo Kenyatta International Airport for the return journe to Beijing, Anthony said: “If you'll come over here, I've got your snake for you”.



I retrieved the camera from the bag, following Anthony to the steep bank, which we clambered down to a point where this Python natalensis was within camera range.



Anthony said that it appeared to be eating. I'm deeply grateful for his keen eye and thoughtfulness in finally enabling me to photograph a snake in Kenya.



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graceland

@@Tom Kellie, Life is good; you found your snake!

 

Happy I have not.... ;) but I imagine where I live there are a few lurking.

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Tom Kellie

@@Tom Kellie, Life is good; you found your snake!

 

Happy I have not.... ;) but I imagine where I live there are a few lurking.

 

~ @graceland:

 

Thank you!

A more dramatic and unexpected end to a safari could not be imagined.

I was literally about to step into the vehicle to head out to the airport when Emakoko manager Anthony Childs hailed me.

How could I possibly decline the long-deferred opportunity to photograph a snake in the wild?

The muddy, vine-covered bank sloped down towards the muddy Mbagathi River, thus Anthony urged me to be cautious.

Only crazed safari photographers would delay their departure for a snake and consider it to be a peak experience.

I've accordingly edited my Safaritalk profile to reflect the snake photo, as well as to note that the next safari will be in late July, 2015, which will include a second stay at the Emakoko.

Tom K.

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Abena

Lots of really spectacular photos in this thread! I'm still learning all the gifts the Safaritalk website has to offer - all the reptiles - great stuff.

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Tom Kellie

Lots of really spectacular photos in this thread! I'm still learning all the gifts the Safaritalk website has to offer - all the reptiles - great stuff.

 

~ @Abena:

 

If someday you're able to photograph and post any image of a Ghanian reptile, that will be highly welcomed by all of us!

Safaritalk overflows with treasure, if one assiduously peruses the various forums.

Tom K.

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Tom Kellie

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Crocodylus niloticus on a Sandbar



Photographed at 2:16 pm on 7 February, 2014 in Masai Mara National Reserve, Kenya, using an EOS 1D X camera and an EF 400mm f/2.8L IS II super-telephoto lens.



ISO 100, 1/1600 sec., f/2.8, 400mm focal length, handheld Manual exposure.



*********************************************************************************************************



There's a persistent sense that better crocodile photos are needed, hence I'm eager to scan likely looking sand or gavel bars in hopes of spotting one of the magnificent reptiles.



On this occasion we were favored with a fairly close sighting of an adult crocodile, resting on a narrow sandbar.


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Morkel Erasmus

Great pics folks!!

 

Another one from the Chobe river.

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Tom Kellie

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Triassic Relict



Photographed at 3:00 pm on 7 February, 2014 in Masai Mara National Reserve, Kenya, using an EOS 1D X camera and an EF 400mm f/2.8L IS II super-telephoto lens.


ISO 100, 1/1600 sec., f/2.8, 400mm focal length, handheld Manual exposure.


*****************************************************************************************************


I admit to having an inexplicable fondness for Crocodylus niloticus, Nile Crocodile. Could that be because I've never yet observed a crocodile in action with live prey?


This great crocodile maintained its jaws open to thermoregulate, thereby affording a dental hygienist's view of its impressive teeth.

Edited by Tom Kellie

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Tom Kellie

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Too Close for Comfort
Photographed at 4:07 pm on 9 February, 2014 at Lake Baringo, Kenya, using an EOS 1D X camera and an EF 400mm f/2.8L IS II super-telephoto lens.
ISO 800, 1/2000 sec., f/5.6, 400mm focal length, handheld Manual exposure.
*****************************************************************************************************
Our lakeshore route during the boat ride on Lake Baringo took us through thickly growing reeds. The boat guide cautioned us to keep our hands and arms away from the water surface.
It was soon apparent that there were several Crocodylus niloticus, Nile Crocodile, resting amongst the reeds. This specimen slapped its tail and moved away immediately after this photograph was taken.

 

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Tom Kellie

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Textures and Patterns



Photographed at 7:21 am on 29 April, 2014 in Samburu National Reserve, Kenya, using an EOS 1D X camera and an EF 400mm f/2.8L IS II super-telephoto lens.


ISO 200, 1/1600 sec., f/5.6, 400mm focal length, handheld Manual exposure.


*****************************************************************************************************


This female agama was clinging to a wall of the reception center of the Samburu Sopa Lodge. I wondered how she was able to support her body weight from such a precarious position.


The interplay between her scales and the surface of the wall was heightened by morning light. Agamas are a regular feature of safaris in Kenya, which I enjoy photographing.



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Tom Kellie

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Crocodiles Aren't Kittens



Photographed at 1:29 pm on 21 January, 2013 in Masai Mara National Reserve, Kenya, using an EOS 1D X camera and an EF 300mm f/4L IS telephoto lens + EF 1.4x extender.



ISO 100, 1/500 sec., f/5.6, 420mm focal length, handheld Manual Exposure.



*****************************************************************************************************



From the very first safari in 2011 to the present, I've had a strong interest in observing crocodiles. Granted in most, but not all, cases they're at rest with no action as such.



Nevertheless they appeal to me as survivors from ages long past. They lack the soft charm of a kitten or the beauty of a kingfisher, yet have a primitive elegance all their own.


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