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This small copper was trying to warm up...

 

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The buddleja bush in the garden attracts some of the more showy butterflies but they often prefer the upper branches providing some photographic challenges as these peacocks demonstrate.

 

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  • 2 weeks later...
Towlersonsafari

When i was supposed to be gardening on saturday i was distracted- very easily done- by what I think were several Small Purple & Gold micro-moths (Pyrausta aurata) having never heard of such things until this year and seeing  the common Purple and Gold in August-the "small" is a whole 2 mm smaller, but it does have amore  broken yellow line across the fore-wing

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Towlersonsafari

And forgive my indulgence but I really liked this photo of a comma butterfly

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  • 4 weeks later...
Towlersonsafari

a new-for me- moth! the red Underwing (Catacala nupta)

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  • 7 months later...
Towlersonsafari

Lots of butterflies are about nnow and i managed to photograph the Holly Blue  Celastrina argiolus- it is the first of the "blue" butterflies in the uk to fly (so if you see a blue butterfly in April it is a holly blue0 and has, to me , a somewhat manic flight-also it has no brown on its underside. the first Spring brood lays eggs on holly the second summer brood on ivy These were taken in the garden

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Towlersonsafari

we were wandering round our local nature reserve and saw some small black looking moth like creatures with very long antenna- apparently they are micro moths the green longhorn Adela reaumurella

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Towlersonsafari

and today we went to dunstable downs in serach of the Duke of Burgandy butterfly-very local distrubution in the uk and second time lucky. it is a member of the metalmark family-the only one in the uk and nobody knows why it is called the Duke of Burgandy. the scientific name is Hamearis  lucina- a small low flyying butterfly with the males very keen to chase any other butterfly that comes near its perch.this was a first for us and there were a lot about.In france i undertsand they call it La Lucerne and in germany perlbinde- because of the 2 bands on its underwing- and in Sweden and Holland the primrose butterfly after its food plant (it also uses cowslips)

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Towlersonsafari

And finally one of my favourites, the Green Hairstreak  Callophrys  rubi

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pomkiwi

Orange Tip butterflies mating (and the first successful capture I've managed of a butterfly in flight). Taken with my Nikon D500 and PF500 lens as getting close enough to use a macro lens was not an option here.

 

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  • 4 weeks later...
Towlersonsafari

It seemed rude not to go on the guided walks to see possibly Englands rarest butterfly, the Chequered skipper, Carterocephalus palaemon reintroduced to a wood in Northamptonshire from Belgium stock as the butterflies inhabit the same habitat as found here- there is a population in te west of Scotland but they  are found in grassland/moor and use different food plants. it was last seen in the same wood in 1976 prior to the reintroduction. it is a small fast flying butterfly

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Towlersonsafari

vry excited this morning as had just got into the car to go to the office when noticed this just outside the front door- a humminbird hawk Moth  Macroglossum stellatarum  so got out of car rushed back into house got camera fired off a lot of shots- and some were not bad! very fast moving- was only there for about 2 minutes after i got the camera and even 1/5000th did not freeze wings

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Excellent @Towlersonsafari!  I see those in my lilacs here in Alberta (I think it is the same or very similar), but I have unfortunately never had camera to hand when I've seen them.  Have taken lots of pretty pictures of swallowtails in the lilacs, but the hummingbird moth must have known I had my camera out and stayed away :lol:

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Towlersonsafari

Thank you @MMMim-yes i think it is the same species-although there is also the Hummingbird clearwing moth in Canada- i was very surprised mine waited around long enough for me to photograph it!

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@Towlersonsafariyes, very considerate of it! :lol:

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  • 2 weeks later...
Towlersonsafari

it is Black Hairstreak  ( satyrium pruni ) time in Northamptonshire- and it is a very obliging butterfly-regularly feeding on bramble flowers. The hairstreak family were named for the white lines seen on the underwings possibly first recorded by Mr james Petiver (1665-1718)

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Towlersonsafari

and the first of my favourite butterfly, the Marbled White (Melanargia galathea)  are emerging- we found some for the first time in our local nature reserve although that may be because we are not very observant

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  • 1 month later...
Towlersonsafari

there has been second broods of similar looking butterfles-at least from some angles- the brown argus Aricia agestis, and common blue polyommatus icarus. the female common blue looks a lot like the brown argus save for a bluish tinge near the body and with the wings closed the brown arus has a thin black line as a border the white edges. apparently both species second broods are very small in size- the hot weather has accelerated their race to maturity but without the energy to get to their normal size. here are a selection of both species.

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Small tortoiseshell from a trip to Lincolnshire, UK a few weeks ago.

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