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Geoff 2018


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For my contributions to the Big Year 2018 I've set my own standards. I don't expect to get the amazing tallies that other members have achieved in prior years but if I get pleasing images of (say) 150 species I'll be happy. Mostly I will post images in chronological order unless I think I can get a better image of that species and I will then hold off posting that species until later.

 

Sometimes I will add some comments about the image and / or about the species itself.

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  • Geoff

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1. Nankeen (Australian) Kestrel.  (Falco cenchroides)  The smallest Aussie raptor with the exception of some individual male collared sparrow hawks that can be tiny. This bird is a female (m

2. Tawny Frogmouth (Podargus strigoides)   One of the pair that lives in my street and sometimes roosts in the tree in my front yard. This bird is a female, the males tend to be grey but the

37. Scarlet Robin (Petroica boodang)  An absolutely gorgeous Aussie robin. Five robin species are found near my home. Male Female   

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1. Nankeen (Australian) Kestrel.  (Falco cenchroides

The smallest Aussie raptor with the exception of some individual male collared sparrow hawks that can be tiny.

This bird is a female (males have grey streaked foreheads) hunting over sand dunes. Mainly insectivorous they also eat mice, lizards and small birds.  

 

These images are incidental, captured whilst walking with my wife on a local beach. They were taken at 11:30 am and with side and slight backlighting made exposure tricky. So just because it's not the so called golden hour don't put the camera away. The 1st image is full frame, the 2nd I decide to do a vertical crop. 

Nankeen-Kestrel_G8A7944.thumb.jpg.32757f8320b499b12dfbd0e93fe360e7.jpg

Nankeen-Kestrel_G8A7963.thumb.jpg.e12c0fd5ddf24ce01a70276fa0a9e523.jpg  

 

Edited by Geoff
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Kitsafari

more awesome photos to look forward to. :D

 

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Peter Connan

Wow, what a start!

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2. Tawny Frogmouth (Podargus strigoides)

 

One of the pair that lives in my street and sometimes roosts in the tree in my front yard. This bird is a female, the males tend to be grey but there are also rufous morphs. They are incredibly tolerant of humans. If you get close they firstly do an impersonation of a branch. If that doesn't deter you they will growl. One of my favourite species but if they start calling "Ooom Ooom Ooom" at 3:00 am it can drive you nuts.

 

Photographically you have to get their eyes in the light or else you end up with uninteresting black holes.

Tawny-Frogmouth_G8A8310-2.thumb.jpg.4d5378a7feced5c01d938119cc28cb56.jpg

 

 What are you looking at?

Tawny-Frogmouth_G8A8311.thumb.jpg.c7a8cd8e3f28e7efbed6400d89b6d0a8.jpg

  

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Treepol

@Geoff I like your Big Year philosophy to aim for 150 good photos, post chronologically and hold off for better images if possible. I posted a few OK images in December 2017 and hope for better shots of local birds this year.

 

Great start with the Nankeen Kestrel and Tawny Frogmouth, excellent eye shot of the Tawny Frogmouth.

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3. Eastern Osprey (Pandion cristatus) ~ Captured whilst on a family vacation in Queensland. I haven't seen an Osprey where I live for a number of years.

The first 3 images are full frame the other 2 small crops. I was amazed how close I got to this bird when it landed on a small beach in an isolated cove.

Osprey_G8A9432.thumb.jpg.e186b1aaa48d81e1cb31a145567d8fa1.jpgOsprey_G8A8984.thumb.jpg.263367dbd6f5a9c70ce7c91e6973f369.jpg

 

A tricky exposure problem. To keep from blowing the lighter area of the head out I had to heavily underexpose the sky.

Osprey_G8A9920.thumb.jpg.ee03ed083380037175aab430bf43c834.jpgOsprey_G8A9909.thumb.jpg.1fd44e9bf4ffc2766fed983a6eb026f7.jpgOsprey_G8A9965.thumb.jpg.7cded91294571c1e82de7d9977424b9d.jpg

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4. Brahminy Kite (Haliastur indus) Same location as the ospreys.

 

Less than ideal conditions ~ Very strong afternoon light.

Brahminy-Kite_G8A9196.thumb.jpg.ec3dd422e6e01ccbdbd66d456943829a.jpg

Scruffy individual

Brahminy-Kite_G8A9236.thumb.jpg.7836cb9ce95ec05f2be694d99fc7ef23.jpg

Roosting pair, backlit.

Brahminy-Kites_G8A8762.thumb.jpg.27c97338bb6020cbc01b9d05ab079218.jpg

 

 

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5. Eastern Reef Egret (Egretta sacra)  ~ Grey Morph. Still in Queensland. My consolation prize. This bird landed on a rockshelf where I was waiting for tattlers that were there the previous day (when I didn't have my camera) but were a no show.

Eastern-Reef-Egret_G8A8861.thumb.jpg.84c91d2688acc1df912ba0b796330e0e.jpg

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One day also we will adopt same BY/photo philosophy :)! Until then I will enjoy in your photos. When you say full frame (= no cropping) having data of body & lens is useful to understand how close the birds were.

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44 minutes ago, xelas said:

When you say full frame (= no cropping) having data of body & lens is useful to understand how close the birds were.

 

Yes, good point.  All of the above were taken with a walk around setup. A 7D ii with 100-400mm lens. Most images were at 400mm.

The osprey on beach was at 370mm (592mm equivalent FOV) . The frogmouth in tree was at 150mm (240mm), though I've taken images of them with a 100mm macro. Now that January school holidays are over and the extended family has gone home I will do some photography with the 1DX ii with usually 600mm + 1.4TC attached and I don't need to get/want so close. 

Edited by Geoff
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@Geoff - I've been looking forward to this thread and it doesn't disappoint. Great photos as always

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Peter Connan

You are certainly showing us how it should be done! Fantastic stuff.

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Dave Williams

I like your approach in that numbers don't matter. Next year I'll do this same but as i have declared a numeric target publicly I can't back down!

It's a lot more rewarding staking out a good shot than grabbing one purely for the numbers, the latter can end up feeling a tad embarrassing when you feel it's below your normal standard. Fortunately for me the bar for normal isn't too high, from what you have posted so far, yours is Geoff.

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@Geoff

A great start with beautiful photos. I especially like the Nankeen Kestrel.

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Galana

Me too. that is some little bird among a lot of good ones..

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Peter Connan
5 hours ago, Dave Williams said:

Fortunately for me the bar for normal isn't too high, from what you have posted so far, yours is Geoff.

 

Sir, you talk almost as much bul as I do...

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wilddog

 @Geoff Who is that reflected in the eagles eyes on Post 5? Amazing shot.

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10 hours ago, wilddog said:

 @Geoff Who is that reflected in the eagles eyes on Post 5? Amazing shot.

 

Yeah, it's me. Standing on a step ladder.

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18 hours ago, Dave Williams said:

Fortunately for me the bar for normal isn't too high

 

Not from what I've seen.

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  • 2 weeks later...
michael-ibk

Great stuff, Geoff, I look forward to your high quality additions.

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PeterHG

Great photos! Certainly looking forward to more, @Geoff!

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From the salt marsh near my home.

 

6. White-fronted Chat (Epthianura albifrons). 

The males look particularly dapper. Especially at the start of breeding season. This one is starting to look scruffy. 

White-fronted-Chat_G8A1561.thumb.jpg.a829b52fc7d2cf37634fd6c4c0103feb.jpg

 

The females have more muted tones.

White-fronted-Chat_G8A1554.thumb.jpg.a6dd98418d0fc2a693dce3453af0470a.jpg

 

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7. Striated Fieldwren (Calamanthus fuliginosus) another salt marsh specialist although i have seen them in heath & woodland. Their melodious song is gorgeous.

Striated-Fieldwren_G8A1716.thumb.jpg.5c7a50451ddea0f2a4a5bae29561cb23.jpgStriated-Fieldwren_G8A1707.thumb.jpg.f73f76e401fc6af28943badae875c417.jpg

 

Edited by Geoff
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8. Golden-headed Cisticola (Cisticola exilis) The 2nd of the salt marsh LBJ's.

Golden-headed-Cisticola_G8A1620.thumb.jpg.c5282ab1e176769f64a5de3274dee763.jpg

 

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