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Geoff 2018


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9. Superb Fairy-wren (Malurus cyaneus) female. I'll post this image now and add other images of breeding plumage males later.

Whilst unsuccessfully searching for another, very difficult salt marsh LBJ this individual allowed a close approach.

She looks to be a very young bird, not long out of the nest as the tail is quite stubby.

Superb-Fairy-wren_G8A2224.thumb.jpg.4017e179fa872d939a6708f609f7b16e.jpg

  

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  • Geoff

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1. Nankeen (Australian) Kestrel.  (Falco cenchroides)  The smallest Aussie raptor with the exception of some individual male collared sparrow hawks that can be tiny. This bird is a female (m

2. Tawny Frogmouth (Podargus strigoides)   One of the pair that lives in my street and sometimes roosts in the tree in my front yard. This bird is a female, the males tend to be grey but the

37. Scarlet Robin (Petroica boodang)  An absolutely gorgeous Aussie robin. Five robin species are found near my home. Male Female   

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10. Eurasian Coot (Fulica atra) Very common. I occasionally see them in the 1000's. 

Eurasian-Coot_86I8030.thumb.jpg.a73c30f59cc12c2e22e441a79feb657a.jpgEurasian-Coot_86I8074.thumb.jpg.ca9c79b6000b0a254cd833cce4ae087f.jpg

 

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11. Rufous Bristlebird (Dasyornis broadbenti). An enigmatic species. The eastern end of their range finishes about 1 K past my home. With very short wings they are atrocious flyers. I've never seen one fly higher than 1.5 metres off the ground and often for less than 20 metres. They prefer to run about in the undergrowth and are more often heard than seen hence a difficult species to photograph. I love their call, it is the ringtone on my phone.

Rufous-Bristlebird_86I4217.thumb.jpg.02a6b43592354a11d46876e38b4ecd05.jpgRufous-Bristlebird_86I4412.thumb.jpg.080bd5a505cc50c3827377949ce8c7fd.jpg

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12. Satin Flycatcher (Myiagra cyanoleuca) Only in southern Australia for breeding during summer then they head north. I won't see them again until October.

Male.

Satin-Flycatcher_86I5948-2.thumb.jpg.1395231d0b11482a47b4e7beed05936e.jpg

Female.

Satin-Flycatcher_86I7667-2.thumb.jpg.5a9bb31d98f40426756dfb50458b4ddd.jpg

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13. Leaden Flycatcher (Myagria rubecula). Much rarer than Satin Flycatcher on my patch so this was a good find. I did not see the female but they are very similar to Satin flycatchers.

Male.

Leaden-Flycatcher_86I6909.thumb.jpg.09b017b0e712dd69d0c2e6996183bb60.jpgLeaden-Flycatcher_86I6845-2.thumb.jpg.69848e49c2bfe8254d9661bcef457c7b.jpg

 

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14. Sacred Kingfisher (Todiramphus sanctus) With buff edges to wing coverts and scaling on breast this bird is a juvenile.

Sacred-Kingfisher_G8A2081.thumb.jpg.016c7cffd28f35f14c2efc2726d9d482.jpg

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All beautiful, but I especially like the Striated Fieldwren- a stunning bird.

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Peter Connan

Truly beautiful photos of truly beautiful birds!

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xelas

As above, excellent photos of beautiful, and rarely seen, birds!

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Kitsafari

stunning captures of beautiful birds, as always.

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  • 1 month later...
Geoff

Firstly apologies for my absence... family commitments, away & then a somewhat problematic computer glitch. I lost a few pics for this thread (no big deal) and also I have to reprocess the images for my unfinished Zambia TR.  

 

During the cold snap that hit the northern hemisphere the weather where I live was warm to hot. With little time available for photography I visited a small local waterhole (perhaps 4 metres by 10 metres in size) for a few hours on the hotter days. It can be a great location to see birds but difficult for good photography as the birds always land on shaded perches with a bright & cluttered background. So here I will present numerous species that used the same branch.

 

Many of these are juveniles but I will hopefully post adults of the species when I take an image. 

 

15. Crimson Rosella (Platycercus elegans). Juvenile.

Crimson-Rosella_86I8708.thumb.jpg.f21574663dca4b51348b533c5d9afa1e.jpgCrimson-Rosella_86I9568.thumb.jpg.0c28a0036335e6f6642390b669dce829.jpg

16. Eastern Spinebill (Acanthorhynchus tenuirostris)- Adult male

Eastern-Spinebill_G8A3221.thumb.jpg.314b0d2ff5a874f4bca3281abdf99ee8.jpg

17. Yellow-faced Honeyeater (Lichenostomus chrysops)

Yellow-faced-Honeyeater_G8A3435.thumb.jpg.a5c7908281d542324e83f524d2499d07.jpgYellow-faced-Honeyeater_G8A3448.thumb.jpg.5994c235e49328cdd9143b34496d5270.jpg

18. Golden Whistler (Pachycephala pectoralis) - juvenile

Golden-Whistler_G8A2983.thumb.jpg.1f07e4e6a3edbe7e694889427aab5019.jpg

19. White-eared Honeyeater (Lichenostomus leucotis)

White-eared-Honeyeater_G8A2860.thumb.jpg.7b00b4197375338f0e2cc6a4f0575802.jpg

20. Brown-headed Honeyeater (Melithreptus brevirostris)

Brown-headed-Honeyeater_G8A3402.thumb.jpg.11e20d515801567ad2c783027343e22f.jpgBrown-headed-Honeyeater_G8A3406.thumb.jpg.531c1f3346f2178d8cb41a6e294ee438.jpg

21. New Holland Honeyeater (Phylidonyris novaehollandiae)

New-holland-Honeyeater_G8A2817.thumb.jpg.1e3cd59ab1d8416b66f8686e0e8bfe1d.jpg

22. White-naped Honeyeater (Melithreptus lunatus)

White-naped-Honeyeater_G8A3159.thumb.jpg.add7d422ac81e7a7f3b8a809235ab4aa.jpgWhite-naped-Honeyeater_86I5707.thumb.jpg.9d8ec81ebae812c0a353dcdd3ecbfa01.jpgWhite-naped-Honeyeater_G8A3396.thumb.jpg.6dc80398a107a38d7765ee1e303527ce.jpg

23. White-browed Scrubwren (Sericornis frontalis) - I suspect a young bird the white eyebrow is only beginning to show 

White-browed-Scrubwren_G8A3254.thumb.jpg.a2095d910d0049fd3396b1b819e20f08.jpg

24. Striated Thornbill (Acanthiza lineata) - all thornbill species are tiny

Striated-Thornbill_G8A3145.thumb.jpg.9fae8261edb823b12c522f78cf4d401e.jpg

25. Silvereye (Zosterops lateralis)

Silvereye_G8A3132.thumb.jpg.4fbb7a19511f3369247e00529d075dfa.jpg

26. Red-browed Finch (Neochmia temporalis)

Red-Browed-Finch_86I5403.thumb.jpg.12c0dd96e240d6fb1771e0f6dc1b9e06.jpgRed-browed-Finch_G8A3324.thumb.jpg.4f83471098351f12c3b09b2e0a9acd44.jpg

27. Grey Fantail (Rhipidura albiscapa)

Grey-Fantail_G8A2985.thumb.jpg.1f3e549153063107a2425ac24d5ec92e.jpg

28. Eastern Yellow Robin (Eopsaltria australis) - young bird coming into adult plumage.

Eastern-Yellow-Robin_86I6017.thumb.jpg.86cac54fd65473679b416389c898bd21.jpgEastern-yellow-Robin_86I4634.thumb.jpg.9c169041484b22136db1e152262958fd.jpg

29. Common Bronzewing (Phaps chalcoptera)

Common-Bronzewing_86I0385.thumb.jpg.70908a8e4855aee740b5756f8c4b4098.jpgCommon-Bronzewing_86I0400.thumb.jpg.babf1226a4e053118e146d14c1d6665b.jpg

30.  Crescent Honeyeater (Phylidonyris pyrrhopterus) - young male

Cresent-Honeyeater_G8A3750.thumb.jpg.87d5851faeebdd5c9a34255b04dbe310.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

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Peter Connan

Beauties all @Geoff!

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lmSA84

Glad you're back. Beautiful shots

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elefromoz

@Geoff, what a great waterhole, so much variety, beautiful. I would never have picked the Juv Golden Whistler

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Dave Williams

Top quality as usual Geoff.

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Kitsafari

You are totally forgiven for the long absence - your photos  and the birds are stunning. 

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PeterHG

Absolutely wonderful set of pictures!

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Zim Girl

All stunning and well worth the wait!

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  • 4 weeks later...
Geoff

After another hiatus I'll start again. I must admit to holding quite a few back so after chiding myself for being a perfectionist here's some more.

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Geoff

31. Black-shouldered Kite (Elanus axillaris).  Juvenile.

 

I was hoping to get one of these hovering in flight. I have lots of that type of image and what I thought would be an easy task for the 2018 BY has so far not eventuated. There were 2 adults & 2 juveniles perched in a dead tree. One adult was eating a mouse and the juveniles were screaming for food. As I approached the adults flew off to the next tree but the juveniles stayed put for an extended period. This species and very similar raptors the world over are beautiful birds. 

Black-shouldered-Kite_G8A5566.jpg

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Geoff

32. Australian Hobby (Falco longipennis) Adult female. I know this confiding individual quite well and check her favourite perches. She often used this tree but 3 days after i took this image the farmer knocked the tree down and dumped it over his fence into the adjacent wetland. There's a bit of branch clutter that for me lessens the image. 

Australian-Hobby_G8A5676.jpg

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Geoff

33. Little Grassbird (Megalurus gramineus)  Back in the post for bird #9 I alluded to another saltmarsh LBJ. Well this is it. They are a very hard species to capture a good image. There have been times when I've tried for hours and gone home with my tail between my legs. I was lucky with this image too, he literally popped up to the top of the plant for a brief moment and then disappeared into the bush again.

Little-Grassbird_86I2959.jpg

Edited by Geoff
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