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penolva

Thanks to @@Geoff I am able to post this with a beautiful border around it!! :D Pen

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Geoff

Congrats on being the 'New Life' winner :D

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penolva

Thanks it was a couple of years ago now!

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mvecht

Does it count if it is not from Africa?

15 minutes old "Tiger"

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Edited by mvecht

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GBE

Loliondo February 2013

Perhaps not what first comes to mind for safari babies, but our experience in the boma was a heck of a start. Not a cultural boma, but the family of one of the workers at our camp. Standing in the middle of the boma we were waiting for the tour to start... only to be informed "this is it". Ha! That started such a wonderful morning of then talking with and watching everyone at their work. Part of that work included two calf births, neither of which seemed to be a smooth as we see on TV. At any rate, couldn't help be include this:

 

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Now to more traditional expectations. These next two were such a thrill. Still in Lobo but making our way to Seronera we came upon our first lionesses and 7 cubs:

 

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Also at the same location as the lionesses and cubs:

 

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I'd be remiss if I didn't include my favorite "babe"... She'll kill me for this but I can't help myself:

 

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Somewhere in the Moru Kopjes area we came upon a Lion tree. OK, it's a sausage tree? But with 11 lions hanging out in the branches it's hard to think of it as anything short of a Lion tree:

 

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I believe these Cheetah were in the Semetu area:

 

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The herds were well spread because of the lack of rain and all the birthing we expected/hoped to see simply didn't happen while we were there. But, we did see a fair number of Wilde calves. This one, in the Ngorongoro, narrowly escaped thanks to a protective mother and later a kick from a Zebra:

 

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Love Zebra and hard to not to love little jumbos... also in the crater:

 

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These last few were in Manyara:

 

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Oh, and one last baby. Not quite as new as the Masai Calf but still wet. Somewhere in the Ndutu area:

 

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Peter Connan

Some lovely ones here @@GBE

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michael-ibk

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Indian Rhinoceros, Kaziranga

 

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Capybara, Rio Paraguai

 

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Cheetah, Maasai Mara

 

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Western Hoolock Gibbon, Hoolongapar Gibbon Sanctuary

 

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Black-Backed Jackal, Nakuru

 

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Skimmer Chick, Rio Paraguai

 

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Thomson´s Gazelle, Maasai Mara

 

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Gaur, Tadoba

 

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Lion, Maasai Mara

 

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Giant Otter, Corixo Negro

 

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Grant´s Gazelle, Ol Pejeta

 

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Howler Monkey, Pousada Piuval

 

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Spotted Hyena, Maasai Mara

 

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Rock Martin, Sandai Farm

 

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Elephant, Serengeti

 

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Black Rhinoceros, Ol Pejeta

 

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Lion, Kwara Concession

 

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Spotted Deer, Kanha

 

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White Rhino, Solio

 

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Leopard, Maasai Mara

 

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Zebra, Tarangire

 

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Lion, Kwando Concession

 

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Giraffe, Kwando Concession

 

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Nilgai, Ranthambore

 

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Baboon, Serengeti

 

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Waterbuck, Solio

 

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Northern Plains Langur, Kanha

 

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Impala, Solio

 

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Dhole, Tadoba

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mvecht

@@michael-ibk Excellent series. I especially like the baby Langur.

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TonyQ

@@michael-ibk

So many wonderful babies - so difficult to pick a favourite as I love them all!

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Tom Kellie

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Jackal Pups in a Culvert



~ Photographed on 28 July, 2015 at 6:52 am in Nairobi National Park, Kenya, with a Sony RX1 R camera.



ISO 3200, f/4, 1/80 sec., 35mm focal length, handheld Automatic exposure.



*******************************************************************************************************



Our gifted Emakoko guide, @@Peter Muigai., took us on a morning game drive. He went directly to a remote culvert in which a litter of Black-backed Jackal pups lived.



As it happens, his doing so may have saved them from a predator. As we sat observing and photographing them, a large Spotted Hyena was nervously pacing down the track, looking in our direction.



It may have been waiting for the parents to be away from the culvery nest, in order to prey upon a jackal cub. They were playful and curious, insufficiently wary of our looming presence.


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Game Warden

Great additions everyone. Let's see your latest baby pics from Africa...

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ellenhighwater

My husband keeps asking why I'm making 'squeeing' sounds over here. So much cuteness. A few of my favorite babies:

 

Samburu, Kenya

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Bushbuck, South Luangwa

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Ngorongoro

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Dwarf Mongoose, Serengeti

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Banded Mongoose, Chobe, Botswana

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This little guy couldn't quite figure out how to get down. Serengeti

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Learning to hoot. Kabale, Uganda

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Rwanda

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Chobe

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And lastly a bushBABY *ducks* Sorry, couldn't resist. Maun, Botswana.

 

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SafariChick

@@ellenhighwater there's nothing like this thread to cheer one up if one is feeling down so your sqeeing is entirely understandable! Love all your babies. The chimp, gorilla, leopard hippo especially - and of course, the BushBABY - that's a great photo of one as when I've seen them it's always been dark and my nighttime photo skills are severely limited!

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Tom Kellie

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Footloose and Fancy-free



Photographed on 28 January, 2015 at 5:58 pm in Buffalo Springs National Reserve, Kenya, with an EOS 1D X camera and an EF 400mm f/2.8L IS II super-telephoto lens.



ISO 640, 1/1000 sec., f/8, 400mm focal length, handheld Manual exposure.



****************************************************************************************************



~ Intrepid. This adventuresome baby elephant was all of that and more, clambering up the bluffs along the Ewaso Nyiro River with panache as if no effort was expended in doing so.



Elephant babies are certainly well-bonded to their mothers and the older females in their group, yet often surprise me with their independent spirits, as if their small hearts are prepared to someday be in immense bodies.


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Antee

One week old with a bright future (We will hope).

 

Captured in Kazinga Channel, Queen Elisabeth NP , Uganda.

 

(By the way, 4 different species in a couple of metres in the photo, what is the Safaritalkrecord on the "most-species-in-one-photo"? Maybe should start a thread...)

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Edited by Antee

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Tom Kellie

~ @@Antee

 

Lovely images!

Were these photographs taken this year?

The top image is interesting because the plover on the ground, the oxpeckers on the buffalo and the buffalo itself are all tolerated by the hippo mother.

That's an eye-pleasing mix of species. A very special capture.

Thank you for posting these.

Tom K.

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Tom Kellie

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Reassurance



Photographed at 11:20 am on 29 July, 2015 directly above the Emakoko safari lodge, Nairobi, Kenya, using an EOS 1D X camera and an EF 400mm f/2.8L IS II super-telephoto lens.


ISO 200, 1/2500 sec., f/2.8, 400mm focal length, handheld Manual exposure.


*****************************************************************************************************


On the final morning in Kenya, following a highly productive 2-week safari, there was a nature walk in the nearby environs of the Emakoko, beside Nairobi National Park, led by guide @@Peter Muigai.


We encountered a donkey foal tied up beside a chain-link fence. It's mother walked up and nuzzled it, the two exhibiting considerable affection. A mother's love reassures, whether a jenny or one's own.

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Peter Muigai.

I took this photo while heading back to Emakoko after a long game drive. I liked the idea of the Giraffes walking in a straight line heading home as well...lol!

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Tom Kellie

I took this photo while heading back to Emakoko after a long game drive. I liked the idea of the Giraffes walking in a straight line heading home as well...lol!

 

~ @@Peter Muigai.

 

That's a terrific giraffe image!

Really cool!

It's especially interesting that all four giraffes were using the track, rather than walking through grass.

For other Safaritalk members, it merits mentioning that @@Peter Muigai. is a superb guide at the Emakoko by Nairobi National Park.

He's also a dedicated wildlife photographer, as his image shows.

During visits to the Emakoko in both May and July of this year Peter effectively ‘opened up’ Nairobi National Park for me.

There were superlative lion pride, rhino and jackal pup sightings. Peter especially showed his skills in finding a wide range of bird species.

It's a joy to see his photo post here, which I hope will be the first of many to come.

Tom K.

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RPM

We almost drove right past her (November 1st Olare Motorogi). The guys at Lion Camp (William and Jackson) spotted her with her precious passengers. We stopped for a bit for photos (there are two little ones). Later in the day it poured el nino (rivers lifted, trees uprooted, and tents were damaged). We wondered what happened to the cubs. She brought them to higher ground and carried on. Later in the trip, she tucked them into a camera resistant thicket, tried to hunt, and greeted her pride. The guides say these moms (Monico Pride and Olare Conservancy Prides) are the best at keeping their cubs alive.

 

 

 

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TonyQ

@@RPM

They are beautiful - so tiny! I am pleased the mother knows how to keep them safe.

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penolva

I didn't like spotted hyena until this little guy approached our vehicle and gave me such a lovely sweet look! Who could not like that beautiful face?

 

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Tom Kellie

~ @@RPM

 

What a great story!

I'm impressed that you saw newborn loin cubs in the wild.

Having never seen baby lions during any safari, your photos impressed me.

Thank you for telling us about your sighting.

Tom K.

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Tom Kellie

I didn't like spotted hyena until this little guy approached our vehicle and gave me such a lovely sweet look! Who could not like that beautiful face?

 

~ @@penolva

 

Yes! It's a lovely face with the guileless look of the young.

Thank you for showing a different perspective of a familiar species.

Very nice sighting!

Tom K.

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LastChanceSafaris

How about this little guy I saw last year whilst on a MTB ride in Chobe's Lesoma Valley area

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