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Michael´s Third Year


michael-ibk

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michael-ibk

No need to Peter, I really don´t expect you (or anybody) to be familiar with my local hunting grounds. ;-)

 

39/E39.) Serin (Serinus serinus) / Girlitz

 

Winklern, Carinthia, 1/4. I know Serins are not uncommon in many areas but not where I live - these are actually the very first birds of this species I´ve seen in Austria - in my father´s garden of all places!

 

large.5ace4bf42edb1_WinklernGirlitz.JPG.

 

 

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46/CH4.) Red-Throated Bee-Eater (Merops bulocki) / Rotkehlspint   One of the most spectacular birds in the park, high on my target list. Fortunately they were common and quite approachable.

21/E21.) Dalmatian Pelican (Pelecanus crispus) / Krauskopfpelikan   Lake Kerkini, Northern Greece, 17/3/2018. This is a great birding destination just an hour´s drive North from Thessaloniki

28/E28.) Greylag Goose (Anser anser) / Graugans   Chiemsee, 24/3/2018. Probably the most common Goose in Middle Europe. Don´t know how popular "The Wonderful Adventures of Nils Holgersson" b

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michael-ibk

40/E40.) Yellowhammer (Emberiza citrinella) / Goldammer

 

Gaisau, Tirol, 25/3 and 7/4. Another local very yellow bird. Two years ago I found it difficult to tell this apart from a Serin but they actually look quite different. The most common Bunting in Europe.

 

large.Gaisau_3_Goldammer.JPG.6eb87c61d33

 

large.5ace4c0d01cfb_GoldammerGaisau2503.

 

And a Chaffinch thrown in just because it was posing nicely.

 

large.Gaisau_32_Buchfink.JPG.f8fed22baf8

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41/E41.) Fieldfare (Turdus pilaris) / Wacholderdrossel

 

Gaisau, Tirol, 7/4. Around in good numbers in harsher winters (like this one).

 

large.Gaisau_14_Wacholderdrossel.JPG.0b0

 

 

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42/E42.) Silver Teal (Spatula versicolor) / Silberente

 

Tiebelmündung, Carinthia, 8/4. Now what is this South American species doing in my count? Well, it´s been around in Carinthia for three years now, clearly some escapee, but nobody knows where it came from. Liked to hang around with Garganeys when I saw it.

 

large.5ace4c261fda0_TiebelSilberente.JPG

 

And some Nuthatch pics from Chiemsee. I had not known they accept nesting boxes but apparently readily so. It was interesting to watch it because it was plastering the entrance hole with mud - that´s where they get their German name "Kleiber" (basically plasterer) from.

 

large.Chiemsee_46_Kleiber.JPG.7dbdbe3fc3

 

large.Chiemsee_47_Kleiber.JPG.11227849b9

 

medium.Chiemsee_42_Kleiber.JPG.f43cab85c

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Galana
2 hours ago, michael-ibk said:

clearly some escapee, but nobody knows where it came from.

I should check @xelas's back yard. His BY thread is full of exotics!:D

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xelas
9 hours ago, Galana said:

His BY thread is full of exotics!:D

 

And more are already in the pipeline :D:P!

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PeterHG

You got some really good ones, @michael-ibk: Little Crake, Bittern, Bluethroat and even a Silver Teal (which I didn't even know existed). Love you Swan photos, too. They can really look very impressive!

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elefromoz

@michael-ibk, the Swan shots are as beautiful as the ones you took of the Pelican 

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michael-ibk

Time for some African birds - some stuff from Chad coming up, Trip Report just started here. I´m doing this in the (not always logical) order of Zakouma´s official bird list (which includes 398 species). This was not a birding trip and even though my travel mates were very patient with me (for which I´m thankful) I have no doubt one could get many more species with a "birdier" focus. No regrets though - I still am a mammal guy after all! :) All photos from March 1st to March 10th and from Zakouma National Park unless noted differently.

 

43/CH1.) Vieillot´s Barbet (Lybius vieilloti) / Blutbrust-Bartvogel

 

Two sigthings of this bird. Unfortunately we missed the Black-Breasted Barbet, a special of this park. Only occurs in Chad, Sudan, CAR and (rarely) in very Northern Uganda, so Zakouma would be the best place to see it.

 

large.5ad1c2d9c6efa_BY1VieillotsBarbet2.

 

large.5ad1c2d2c58e2_BY1VieillotsBarbet1.

Edited by michael-ibk
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44/CH2.) Bateleur (Terathopius ecaudatus) / Gaukler

 

Not as common as in the classic safari areas, only saw two birds.

 

large.5ad1c2e5b46ff_BY2Bateleur.JPG.176d

 

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45/CH3.) Little Bee-Eater ( Merops pusillus ) / Zwergspint

 

Only one seen in the park, the one here was photographed in N´Djamena, seen just outside the Hilton Hotel by the Chari River.

 

large.5ad1c2eb63acb_BY3LitteBee-Eater.JP

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46/CH4.) Red-Throated Bee-Eater (Merops bulocki) / Rotkehlspint

 

One of the most spectacular birds in the park, high on my target list. Fortunately they were common and quite approachable.

 

large.5ad1c30a77ea1_BY4Red-ThroatedBee-E

 

large.5ad1c2f8c4d3d_BY4Red-ThroatedBee-E

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47/CH5.) (Little) Green Bee-Eater (Merops orientalis) / Asien-Smaragdpint

 

The second common Bee-Eater in the park, an old friend from India (where it also occurs).

 

large.5ad1c338c951f_BY5GreenBee-Eater.JP

 

large.5ad1c327d04e7_BY5GreenBee-Eater3.J

 

 

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48/CH6.) Northern Carmine Bee-Eater (Merops nubicus) / Karminspint

 

A particular favourite of mine, also pretty common in the park. Unfortunately we could not find the time to visit one of their colonies, one was close to camp (we saw them flying over a lot). So the only photo opportunites were on the wing.

 

large.5ad1c35133814_BY6NorthernCarmineBe

 

large.5ad1c34baf3f0_BY6NorthernCarmineBe

 

large.5ad1c3438c4e4_BY6NorthernCarmineBe

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49/CH7.) Common Bulbul (Pycnonotus barbatus) / Graubülbül

 

Not a single one in the park, this one is from the Hotel´s garden in N´Djamena.

 

large.5ad1c35fc5754_BY7CommonBulbul.JPG.

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50/CH8.) Black-Bellied Bustard (Eupodotis melanogaster) / Schwarzbauchtrappe

 

The only Bustard seen (twice). I assume that birds like Arabian or Denham´s Bustard (which are on the list) occur in the more arid Western areas of the park.

 

large.5ad1c369686be_BY8Black-BelliedBust

 

large.5ad1c373cd5a7_BY8Black-BelliedBust

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51/CH9.) Grasshopper Buzzard (Butastur rufipennis) / (Heuschreckenteesa)

 

A Sahelian raptor. Seen only once in the North of the park over a wetland - heavy crop here. Lizard Buzzard was also seen one time in the distance.

 

large.5ad1c37751355_BY9GrasshopperBuzzar

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52/CH10.) Grey-Backed Camaroptera (Camaroptera brachyura) / (Meckerbogenflügel)

 

Quite common in the park, this one is from N´djamena.

 

large.5ad1c38103a34_BY10Grey-BackedCamar

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53/CH11.) Reed aka Long-Tailed Cormorant (Phalacrocorax africanus) / Riedscharbe

 

Not seen in the park, just this single bird close to the Hotel in N´djamena. Some White-Breasted Cormorants were also recognizable in the middle of the river but too far away to even try.

 

large.5ad1f9393821c_BY11ReedCormorant.JP

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54/CH12.) Senegal Coucal (Centropus senegalensis) / Spornkuckuck

 

The only Coucal we saw. Black Coucal also occurs in the park (and would have been a new one for me) but decided to remain hidden.

 

large.5ad1f94333e82_BY12SenegalCoucal.JP

 

 

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55/CH13.) Black Crowned Crane (Balearica pavonina ceciliae) / Kronenkranich

 

Common in the wetland areas of the park.

 

large.5ad1f96255809_BY13BlackCrownedCran

 

large.5ad1f9506a9af_BY13BlackCrownedCran

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56/CH14.) Pied Crow (Corvus albus) / Schildrabe

 

 I often almost fail to get a picture of these as they mostly occur outside national parks and I tend to forget about them, but this one was posing nicely (well, as nicely as a Crow can) for me just outside my cabin.

 

large.5ad1f976b37bb_BY14PiedCrow.JPG.154

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57/CH15.) African Mourning Dove (Streptopelia decipiens) / Brillentaube

 

Actually I first thought this was a Red-Eyed Dove (which is why I unfortunately did not bother to take pictures of this species later in the park where I definitely did see them). But it just does not look quite right for that species, especially the very grey head. So I do think it´s a Mourning Dove. The eyes are said to be orange-red (instead of the familiar diagnostic yellow) in West Africa. Still, the lack of the broad red eye-ring is confusing, and I´m not completely sure. Opinions?

 

large.5ad1f98180533_BY15Red-EyedDove.JPG

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michael-ibk

58/CH16.) Laughing Dove (Streptopelia senegalensis) / Palmtaube

 

Regularly seen but not in big numbers. This one from N´Djamena.

 

large.5ad1f99d64198_BY16LaughingDove.JPG

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