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A Lesser Big Year - for Kit&Herman 2020

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Dave Williams

The grass is always greener or so they say. it's true as well!!

Some cracking birds amongst that lot.

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Kitsafari

 

Thanks @michael-ibk, @pedro maia, @Zim Girl, @Dave Williams

 

48/SG48 : Rusty-breasted Cuckoo, Jurong Lake Gardens

 

An uncommon resident, the rusty-breasted cuckoo is part of the brush cuckoo family and looks very similar to the plaintive cuckoo, except for the orange breast. 

 

BrushCuckoo2-JLG.jpg.2c7bb215d14324b1272b1194b4b92796.jpg

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49/SG49 : Oriental Reed Warbler, Lorong Halus

 

An uncommon winter visitor from lands of Siberia, northern China, Japan and Korea. It is one of 10 species of warblers seen in Singapore, most of them being winter migrants.

 

OrientalReedWarble-LH.jpg.bd6aa21d12fabf8bbb44bdd9d455221a.jpg

 

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50/SG50 : Blue-winged Pitta, Singapore Botanic Gardens

 

The blue-winged pitta returned to the gardens late last year and stuck around for a while, but hasn't been seen in recent days, probably making its way back up north to its breeding grounds in southwestern China and northern Indochina. No Kitchen Pitta so far.....

 

BlueWingedPitta-SBG.JPG.bb40e9b992707c546b0adfdd06c98996.JPG

 

 

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51/SG51 : Hooded Pitta, Hindhede Nature Park

 

The hooded pitta also returned to its regular haunt at Hindhede Nature Park. It has mostly green plumage with a dark brown crown that looks like black in the shadows of the forest.

 

 

 HoodedPitta1-HHNP.JPG.11b1ed3338244a7981b08f93a8cfbccb.JPGHoodedPitta2-HHNP.JPG.088a76788b75fcf78c04c56f9ad5844a.JPG

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52/SG52 :Brown Shrike, Marina East

 

Another regularly seen migrant species, the brown shrike is one of three shrikes seen in Singapore. it is found mainly in Asia and looks very similar to the tiger shrike. The main difference, although sometimes it is hard to ascertain!, is that the brown shrikes prefers open scrub areas while the tiger prefers wooded.

 

BrownShrike-CBP-18.jpg.32778aec282c0d3991907daefd3e9f48.jpg

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53/SG53 : Long-tailed Shrike, Seletar/Marina East

 

The long-tailed shrike is the only resident species of the three shrike species seen in Singapore. It is fairly commonly seen, and we've seen them in our neighbourhood as well but not as regularly. It has less bars than the other two shrikes, and have rufous patches on either side of its underbody. It has a grey cap and the thick black eye-band extends well above the eyes. 

 

LongTailedShrike-MarinaEast-4.jpg.6807a21ef741de58085b9b5667653b8e.jpg

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54/SG54 : Baya Weaver, Lorong Halus

 

The baya weavers are reliably found in Lorong Halus where they weave their nests above a small pond hidden by overgrown bushes and trees by a trail. Sometimes they are joined by the golden-backed weavers, which are an introduced species but are doing well here too. the baya weavers are one of two resident weavers, the other being the uncommonly seen streaked weaver. Breeding males have a yellow top, but this was taken during the non-breeding season, when the male and female look alike. 

 

BayaWeaver(F)-LH.jpg.a65978d100f5f9af88b95cae4614e18d.jpg

Edited by Kitsafari

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55/SG55 : Golden-backed Weaver, Lorong Halus

 

I'm not 100% sure, but I think this is a golden-backed weaver as baya weavers do not have red eyes. Let me know if anyone disagrees! The golden-backed weaver is introduced from Africa, probably released from the caged bird trade.

 

BayaWeaver(M)LH.jpg.c8f07c2c98a3ac04b8fdc35fdbc99a19.jpg

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56/SG56 : Watercock, Jurong Lake Gardens

 

The newly opened Jurong Lake Gardens has been a surprising relevation with a fair number of interesting species being seen. The watercock is a new species for Herman and I - being an uncommon winter visitor from its regular grounds in India, China, Japan and northern Southeast Asia. It is considered as part of the rail and crake families. 

 

WaterCock1-JLG.jpg.4cd0bf1c519cbf2ebad262bda1145288.jpgWaterCock2-JLG.jpg.31229989d4c582949736334f661dc141.jpg

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57/SG57 : Orange-headed Thrush, Dairy Farm Nature Park

 

A rare migrant species that attracted a lot of attention.The orange-headed thrush is usually found in India, southern China and northern Southeast Asia. It reminds me of the silverbird, except that its head is mainly orange. 

 

OrangeHeadedThrush2-DFNP.JPG.80c548f74bae72929bc594c10730a771.JPG

 

OrangeHeadedThrush1-DFNP.JPG.83ab3a372c3ce2d6cc964b98ee1c368d.JPG

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shazdwn

Picking up the pace now @Kitsafari.

 

Some great shots but I just have to say it - its cockatoo not cuckatoo ;)

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5 hours ago, shazdwn said:

Picking up the pace now @Kitsafari.

 

Some great shots but I just have to say it - its cockatoo not cuckatoo ;)

 

@shazdwn I had to laugh that I had spelt it with a '"u" instead of an "o"! I blame it on the fat finger. 

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shazdwn
12 minutes ago, Kitsafari said:

 

@shazdwn I had to laugh that I had spelt it with a '"u" instead of an "o"! I blame it on the fat finger. 

 

:lol::lol::lol::lol::lol:

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Dave Williams

The Watercuck :rolleyes:is a bit special, I saw one fly past our cruise ship and got a record shot but a well travelled birding pal of mine was envious of that as he's never seen one. He'd be extremely envious of your sighting.

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PeterHG

Great additions. Those Pittas are always a joy to see.

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Kitsafari

58/SG58 : Asian Fairy Bluebird, Dairy Farm Nature Park

 

An uncommon resident but once the massive fig tree at the Dairy Farm park fruits, you'll find them there eating alongside the larger green pigeons. 

 

Female

AsianFairyBluebird(F)-DFNP.jpg.5a983573755feb8e4f587142923eed6c.jpg

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59/SG59: Sooty-headed Bulbul, Lorong Halus

 

Widely introduced to our shores years ago and doing fairly well. A pair is a resident at the Lorong Halus wetlands.

 

SoothyHeadedBB1-LH.jpg.2b700860a1c014af07ecad69fd5c5e7d.jpg

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60/SG60 : Greater Racket-Tailed Drongo, Dairy Farm Nature Park

 

Quite regularly seen in the Dairy Farm park as well as at the Singapore quarry. Easily distinguished by its rackets, although sometimes the drongo loses them. It's a breeding resident here. I love their distinctive calls echoing in the forest. 

 

LesserRacketTailDrongo-DFNP.jpg.a6bc1251b718879b9fd1a9acd2adf7b5.jpg

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61/SG61 : Common Greenshank, Sungei Bedok

 

A shorebird! in the canalised Sungei (which means river in Malay) Bedok with a low stream of water. 

 

CommonGreenshank-SgBedok.jpg.ce93b8a9b8fd711bb16bae8cb016e0bb.jpg

 

 

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Kitsafari

Just an update on the Malayan Pied Fantail's nesting - sadly, the female Asian koel found the nest,  and was either eating the eggs or throwing the eggs out. we heard the fantails loudly calling but it was too late as it had done the damage. the fantails are not sitting on the nest,so we surmised the koel had eaten the eggs rather than lay hers there. in any case, the fantail's nest is small - just like a tiny teacup.

 

Flipping back to our garden birds

 

62/SG62: Olive-backed Sunbird, Eastwood

 

Tiny sunbirds that sing loudly every morning perched on the tree or the antenna.

 

The reason for its name: 

 

DSC07033.JPG.632b33703b6566bcd893eead5213ea41.JPG

 

Only the male has the blue luminous throat 

OliveBackedSB-EG.jpg.7328d2edb643467badb859a9ed0bfc4f.jpg

 

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63/SG63 : Common Tailorbird, Eastwood 

 

The tailorbird is back! Hadn't seen it in months and it was in a courting mood. it was chasing a female - calling loudly, hopping and flipping its tail straight up to show off its prowess. Hope it gets successful...This is a resident bird, tiny and often heard before being seen. 

 

DSC07003.JPG.e39c0e9d929cc879fcf403affe2e4e49.JPGDSC07007.JPG.1e45b7e40334b5560f259426297ec414.JPG

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PeterHG

That Olive-backed Sunbird is a real beauty!

 

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TonyQ

Just catching up!

Some wonderful additions, the ducklings are beautiful- I hope some survive this year. The Crake is wonderful, and the pittas stunning.

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Peter Connan

Sorry about the fantails.

Beautiful shots of beautiful birds once again!

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